Nurse and Spy in the Union Army

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Cosimo, Inc., 2005 - 412 páginas
While in the "Secret Service" as a "Spy," which is one of the most hazardous positions in the army-she penetrated the enemy's lines, in various disguises, no less than eleven times; always with complete success and without detection. Her efficient labors in the different Hospitals as well as her arduous duties as "Field Nurse," embrace many thrilling and touching incidents, which are here most graphically described.-from the original "Publisher's Notice"It sounds like the stuff of pulp fiction, but it's all true. Or mostly true, at least. Sarah Edmonds, disguised as "Franklin Thompson," enlisted in the Union Army in 1861; saw combat at the Battle of Blackburn's Ford, First Bull Run/Manassas, the Peninsular Campaign, Antietam, and Fredericksburg; and sometimes served as a spy "disguised" as a woman! Afraid of her secret being discovered, "Franklin" went AWOL, and Sarah rejoined the cause as a nurse. These thrilling adventures of a daring woman in the Civil War have been accused of being "fanciful," but that's just the beginning of their charm.SARAH EMMA EDMONDS SEELYE (1841-1898) was born in New Brunswick, Canada, ran away from home at 17, disguised as a boy. An 1884 congressional bill recognized her service to the Union and granted her a military pension. She died in Texas, and her remains today are housed in a Grand Army of the Republic plot in Houston.

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Página 346 - My dear General : I do not remember that you and I ever met personally. I write this now as a grateful acknowledgment for the almost inestimable service you have done the country. I wish to say a word further. When you first reached the vicinity of Vicksburg, I thought you should do what you finally did — march the troops across the neck, run the batteries with the transports, and thus go below ; and I never had any faith, except a general hope that you knew better than I, that the...
Página 212 - If I save this army now, I tell you plainly that I owe no thanks to you or to any other person in Washington. You have done your best to sacrifice this army.
Página 144 - In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea, With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me : As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free, While God is marching on.
Página 233 - On this, our nation's birthday, we declare to our foes who are rebels against the best interests of mankind, that this army shall enter the capital of their so-called confederacy; that our national constitution shall prevail, and that the Union which can alone insure internal peace and external security to each state, "must and shall be preserved," cost what it may in time, treasure and blood.
Página 188 - Soldiers of the Army of the Potomac ! I have fulfilled at least a part of my promise to you. You are now face to face with the rebels, who are held at bay in front of their capital. The final and decisive battle is at hand.
Página 174 - I am very glad of General FJ Porter's victory; still, if it was a total rout of the enemy, I am puzzled to know why the Richmond and Fredericksburg railroad was not seized again, as you say you have all the railroads but the Richmond and Fredericksburg. I am puzzled to see how, lacking that, you can have any, except the scrap from Richmond to West Point. The scrap of the Virginia Central, from Richmond to Hanover Junction, without more, is simply nothing. That the whole of...
Página 196 - Be assured, general, that there never has been a moment when my desire has been otherwise than to aid you with my whole heart, mind, and strength, since the hour we first met ; and whatever others may say for their own purposes, you have never had, and never can have, any one more truly your friend, or more anxious to support you, or more joyful than I shall be at the success which I have no doubt will soon be achieved by your arms.
Página 144 - I have read a fiery gospel writ in burnished rows of steel As ye deal with my contemners, so with you my grace shall deal; Let the Hero, born of woman, crush the serpent with his heel Since God is marching on.

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