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Almanac and Hand-Book

1898

A VOLUME OF STATISTICAL, OFFICIAL, AGRICULTURAL, HISTORICAL

DISTRICT, NATIONAL AND GENERAL INFORMATION.

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PUBLISHED QUARTERLY AT WASHINGTON, D. C., BY THE EVENING STAR NEWSPAPER COMPANY.

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR.

VOL. 4, NO. 1, JANUARY, 1898.

............

Page.

Page.
Agriculture, Department of.... 37 Labor Bureau.....................

37
Art Institutions....

59 Library of Congress..
Assessors, Board of.

10 Licences
Assessments
10 Lumber Inspectors......

12
Audubon Society.
40 Money Order Rates..............

23
Banks
29 National Guard....

30
Banking Resources..
29 National Museum..........

45
Base Ball Record.
60 Navy Department..............

32
Bar Association...
23 Official Directory..

32
Board of Trade.
30 Parks

26 Le
Boiler Inspector...

12 | Parking Commission..
Buildings, Inspector of..

12 | Parks, History of.
Building Operations..

13 Personal Property Tax..
Charities, Superintendent of. 13 | Pharmacy, Commissioners of.. 12
Charities and Reformatories... 14 Physicians to the Poor....

16
Children's Guardians, Board of 13 Places of Interest..

49
Church Directory..
51 Police Court.

23
Civil Service Commission.
37 Police Force..

18
Colleges
57 Population

13
Cord Wood Inspectors..
12 Post Office...

25
Corner
19 Post Office Department...

33
Court of Claims...
44 Property Clerk.

12
Debt of the District..

11 Property Exempt from Taxa-
Diplomatic Corps..
38 tion

10 Pag
Disbursements of the D. C.. 11 Public Buildings and Grounds.. 45
Distances on the Potomac..

29 Rainfall
District Commissioners.
7 Recorder of Deeds.

23
District Government...

7 Reform School, Boys'.
District, Relations of, to United Reform School, Girls'.

15
States
11 Register of Wills.

23
District Rulers, Past and Pres-

AR
Rock Creek Park.

26
ent
46 Sanitary Districts.

17
District Taxation and the Or-

Schools

20 a
ganic Act of 1878.

41 Sealer of Weights and Meas-
Drugzists to the Poor..
17 ures

12
Duties of District Commission-

Secretary to Commissioners.
ers
8 Smithsonian Institution....

45
Engineer Commissioner's AS-

Sources of District Revenues...
sistants
8 State Department.

32
Executive. Mansion:
32 Street Directory...

60 PT
Expenditures:.:.
10 Suburban Drives..

57
Eird Department:.
19 Surveyor of the District.

23
Flour Commissioners.
12 | Temperature

58
Food and Fish Frispectors..
12 Theaters

48
Gaine and.Fish Association.. 48 Treasury Department..
Hăck Rates...............
48 | Trust Companies.

29
Harbor
19 Universities

57
Health Department...
16 U. S. District Attorney.

22
Histry of Washington
5 U. S. Marshal.

22
Industrial Home School
15 | U. S. Supreme Court.

45
Interior Department..
35 Vital Statistics..

18
Jail
24 War Department..

33
Judiciary of the District.

22 Washington Asylum..
Jury Service.....
24 Water Department.

12
Justice, Department of...
33 Water Supply.

12
Justices of the Peace..
24 ) Zoological Park.

27
For General Index, see page 444.
Copyright, 1897, by Robert O. Law.

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PREFACE.

Page.

37 44 9 12 23

The value of THE STAR'S Almanac and Hand Book has been demon30 45 32

strated during the three past years that it has been annually published.
32
26 The fourth issue herewith presented will be found to contain much useful

8
28 information conveniently arranged for ready reference. In its compilation
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12

the greatest care has been exercised to secure the most complete and re-
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49

liable data. The wide scope of its contents and their great value to the 18

many who have occasion constantly to make research for facts having a

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bearing upon current events will be apparent on a quick glance through its

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10 pages.

It will serve as a complete reference library condensed within the

compass of one compact volume, systematically arranged and indexed.

Besides the vast amount of general information in this issue, the affairs

and interests of the District of Columbia are given ample space.

This

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The information thus brought together in regard to the District, espe

46

cially that which relates to the local government, is of great interest to

property owners as well as to citizens generally.

The Hand Book makes

it possible for those who are comparatively strangers at the District build48ing, the headquarters of the city government, to know who to see in re29 gard to any matter in which they may be concerned and which requires

the action of some District official.

A clear and concise statement of the

18

relations of the Capital City to the United States Government is given, as

15 woll as an interesting sketch of the history of the Disı rict.

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knory, but about which in reality the average citizen has but vague ideas.

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In its pages may be found a guide to the principal points of interest in and

about the city and the names of the principal officers of the government,

as well as the names and addresses of the Diplomatic Corps.

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As for THE EVENING STAR, itself, its character and standing are so

well understood in the community to whose interests all its efforts are de

voted that little need be said on that subject.

For the information, how

ever, of strangers into whose hands this book may fall, it may and can be

truthfully said that in a greater degree than any other journal in the

United States The Star fills the ideal of a family daily newspaper.

This

is fully demonstrated by the fact that it is regularly served to subscribers

in 8242 per cent of all the occupied houses in Washington, and in 9223 of all

those occupied by white persons.

It is generally admitted that no news

paper in the world can match this record. It follows, therefore, that as an

advertising medium The Star has no rival and no competitor worth men

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tioning in the territory it covers so completely and so satisfactorily. An

advertisement inserted in its columns literally covers the entire field, sure

as it is to meet the

eye of all readers in the District of Columbia, of what

ever sex, race, color, condition or nationality, political or religious belief.

It only remains to be added that, considering extent and quality of cir

culation, its advertising rates rank with the very lowest in the country.

OFFICIAL REGISTER, DIRECTORY AND

GENERAL INFORMATION.

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The location of the seat of the na- 1 ceived and the members from the tional government was decided upon south and north arrayed themselves by Congress only after acrimonious on sectional lines. The former to a political discussion and long delay. large extent wanted the present site, The boundary lines of the District while the latter were in favor of a were announced by Washington in more northern location. The first 1791, and the history of the ten miles session passed without action, but square, as it was then known, is co- at the second, in 1790, a bill was inincident with that of the city of troduced authorizing

the acquireWashington. After the Continental ment of a tract of land at some place Congress had made the Declaration between the mouths of the Eastern of Independence at Philadelphia the branch and the Connoogocheague for Articles of Federation then adopted the permanent seat of the governprovided that annual sessions of ment of the United States. At this Congress should be held in such time Alexander Hamilton's bill for places as might be determined on funding the war debt of the states from time to time. The Continental was also under consideration, and, as Congress during the period of the most of the money under it was to Revolutionary War held its sessions go to the north, Thomas Jefferson in several cities. In the year 1783 and Alexander Hamilton arranged Congress removed from Philadelphia a compromise between the angry to Princeton, New Jersey, because representatives of the north and of the attempt made by the unpaid south by which both the federal soldiers to overawe that body, the government site measure and the local authorities failing to protect funding bill should pass, it being the dignity of the national legislative decided that the seat of government body. During the next year a reso- should remain at Philadelphia until lution was adopted by Congress pro- 1800, and then be transferred to the viding for the appointment of Com- new site on the Potomac. The act missioners to lay out a site for the determining upon the present site of Federal Capital at the lower falls the nation's capital was passed July of the Delaware. Virginia's repre-7, 1790, and was signed by President sentatives endeavored to have Washington July 16. It authorized Georgetown substituted, but failed. the President to appoint three comThe first Congress under the Consti- missioners to define the boundaries tution met in New York in 1789, and of the District. It was also prothe debate over the selection of a vided that on the first Monday in Desite for the national capital was pro-cember, 1800, all the offices attached longed. The Constitution had dele-to the seat of government should be gated to Congress the power “To removed to the District. President exercise exclusive Legislation in all Washington appointed as commiscases whatsoever, over such District sioners Thomas Johnson and Daniel (not exceeding ten Miles square) as Carroll of Maryland and

David may, by Cession of particular states, Stuart of Virginia, and, March 30, and the Acceptance of Congress, be- 1791, he issued a proclamation defincome the Seat of the Government of ing the boundaries of the District as the United States, and to exercise follows, Congress on March 3 having like Authority over all Places pur- amended the original act so as to chased by the Consent of the Legis- include a section of Virginia helow lature of the State in which the Alexandria: “Beginning at Jones' Same shall be, for the Erection of Point, being the upper cape of HuntForts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock- ing creek in Virginia, and at an anYards, and other needful Build- gle of 45 degrees west of north, and ings:-”

running in a direct line ten miles for When the First Congress met, the first line; then, beginning again therefore, many petitions were re- i at the same Jones' Point and run

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