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Essays

ESSAYS

THE TWO RACES OF MEN The human species, according to the best theory I can form of it, is composed of two distinct races, the men who borrow, and the men who lend. To these two original diversi. ties may be reduce all those impertinent classifications of Gothic and Celtic tribes, white men, black men, red men. All the dwellers upon earth, “Parthians, and Medes, and Elamites," flock hither, and do naturally fall in with one or other of these primary distinctions. The infinite superiority of the former, which I choose to designate as the great race, is discernible in their figure, port, and a certain instinctive sovereignty. The latter are born degraded. “He shall serve his brethren.” There is something in the air of one of this cast, lean and suspicious; contrasting with the open, trusting, generous manners of the other.

Observe who have been the greatest borrowes of all ages Alcibiades-Falstaff-Sir Rich

ard Steele-our late incomparable Brinsleygum what a family likeness in all four!

What a careless, even deportment hath your borrower! what rosy gills ! what a beautiful reliance on Providence doth he manifest, -taking no more thought than lilies! What contempt for money, accounting it (yours and mine ese pecially) no better than dross! What a liberal confounding of those pedantic distinctions of meum and tuum! or rather, what a noble simplification of language, (beyond Tooke,) resolving these supposed opposites into one clear, intelligible pronoun adjective! What near apa proaches doth he make to the primitive come munity,—to the extent of one-half of the principle at least.

He is the true taxer who "calleth all the world up to be taxed;" and the distance is as vast between him and one of us, as subsisted between the Augustan Majesty and the poorest obolary Jew that paid his tribute-pittance at Jerusalem !-His exactions, too, have such a cheerful, voluntary airl-so far removed from your sour parochial or state-gatherers,—those ink-horn varlets, who carry their want of wel. come in their faces! He cometh to you with a smile, and troubleth you with no receipt; con fining himself to no set season. Every day is his Candlemas, or his Feast of Holy Michael. He applieth the lene tormentum of a pleasant look to your purse,--which to that gentle varmth expands her silken leaves, as naturally

as the cloak of the traveller, for which sun and wind contended. He is the true Propontic which never ebbeth,—the sea which taketh handsomely at each man's hand. In vain the victim, whom he delighteth to honour, struggles with destiny; he is in the net. Lend therefore cheerfully, O man ordained to lend, that thou lose not in the end, with thy worldly penny, the reversion promised. Combine not preposterously in thine own person the penal. ties of Lazarus and of Dives ;-but when thou seest the proper authority coming, meet it smilingly, as it were half-way. Come, a hand. some sacrifice! See how light he makes of it! Strain not courtesies with a noble enemy.

Reflections like the foregoing were forced upon my mind by the death of my old friend, Ralph Bigod, Esq., who parted this life on Wednesday evening; dying, as he had lived, without much trouble. He boasted himself a descendant from mighty ancestors of that name, who heretofore held ducal dignities in this realm. In his actions and sentiments he belied not the stock to which he pretended. Early in life he found himself invested with ample revenues; which, with that noble disinterestedness which I have noticed as inherent in men of the great race, he took almost immediate measures entirely to dissipate and bring to nothing: for there is something revolting in the idea of a king holding a private purse; and the thoughts of Bigod were all regal. Thus

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