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While in most of the States this good work is being done, in this District we have lamentably fallen short of our duty. It is true that institutions of different character, supported by the contributions of individuals, and all charitable in their character, abound; it is also true that the District, as a government, has failed to perform its share of the labor, or contribute its quota of the expenses. What is needed is some immediate provision for the care of these females. As stated in the above letter, the present Georgetown Almshouse, with but moderate repair, could be made for the time being, at least, to answer all the purposes both of a penal and reformatory institution for women. If for any reason the Georgetown Almsbouse cannot be converted to this use, some provision should be made for the erection of a suitable building, say on the grounds of the Washington Asylum, or if that is not practi. cable, when the new work-house or city prison is built, as built it must be at an early day, one wing should be devoted to this purpose.

Let me impress upon your minds the urgent need of such an institution, and the further fact that it should by all means be under the control of the state, which will have to support it, and not given in charge of well-meaning but irresponsible committees or individuals. While a general supervision of its working might be intrusted to several of the numerous philanthropic men and women of this city, its control shonld not be allowed to pass out of the hands of the District authorities.

The only institution for women, both penal and reformatory in its character, whose report has reached me, is located in Indianapolis, Ind., and this is but three years old. The report, however, is of the most gratifying character, and the officers are firm in the belief that it will grow in usefulness as it grows in years.

The last annual report of Sarah J. Smith, the superintendent, referring to the prison department,” says:

The prison department, under the able management of Mrs. E. L. Johnson, is admirably conducted. By her firmness and kindness she readily wins the respect and love of the prisoners, so that the most abandoned, accustomed to filthy language and loathsome habits, soon appreciate the clean garment and pleasant surroundings, and learn not only willing and cheerful obedience, but feel tbat work is a privilege and not a pupisbment. We find the system of shortening time for good conduct has had a good effect upon them, which clearly proves, however pleasant prison life may be made, liberty and social life is the great boon for which they strive. “What," will be asked, “has been the result of all this improvement in prison life?” We answer, “ In most cases restored womanhood, to enter life again able to care for themselves, and not be a terror or an expense to society.”

As bearing upon this subject I annex a carefully prepared table, show. ing the character, cost of maintenance, and labor performed in nineteen penal and reformatory institutions in fourteen States of the Union. This shows in all but one the labor system has been introduced, and that although in two-the Catholic Protectory of West Chester, N. Y., and the House of Refuge of Indiana—the labor during the past year has proven unremunerative, it has generally been attended with good and gratifying results. Referring to these institutions in a carefullyprepared table in his last annual report, the Commissioner of Education sbows the total number in the United States to be 56, employing 693 officers and teachers, and the number of inmates to be 10,848, of whom 7,951 are male, and 2,897 are female. The total appual cost for their support is fixed at $1,541,799, of which som the inmates by their labor earn $305,127, besides performing the necessary work in and about the building.

PAUPERISM.

The following statistics on pauperism in the United States are takeli from the latest authentic sources, and are worthy of perusal. In this country, pauperism has certainly been on the gradual increase for the past two decades; but the last census, according to competent authority, totally underrates the extent of the evil at that time. According to their figures, the average number of poor in our population, 38,558,371, was but 116,102 ; about the same number as in Scotland, with a population less than one-tenth as great. The sum reported as expended an. nually for the support of paupers in the whole United States was $10,930,429; of which three States, New York, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts, are reported as expending nearly one-half, $5,039,018, in sup. porting less than 50,000 paupers during the year. Massachusetts, in the year 1874, expended on paupers nearly $1,500,000. The average number of indoor poor was 6,000; of the outdoor poor, 10,500, and of the casual poor, vagrants, &c., about 500; making an average of 17,000 poor of all classes, something more than 1 in every 100 of the popula. tion. The indoor poor of the State of New York, in 1874, cost about $3,250,000, and the outdoor poor about $1,000,000. The indoor poor of Pennsylvania cost, in 1874, about $1,170,000, and the outdoor poor $330,000. The city of Philadelphia, with a population of 700,000, expended only about $120,000 for outdoor relief, and less than $500,000 for its poor of all classes.

The board of charities in New York City expended for outdoor relief, in 1874, less than $150,000; yet the number on its outdoor sick-list was 83,309, who were attended by thirty pbysicians. The number of indoor sick cared for during the same year was 14,987, of whom only 4,169 were residents of New York.

In the city of New Haven, Conn., $1,000 per week was expended during the winter of 1874 and 1875.

Rhode Island, in 1874, supported 900 indoor poor, at an expense of $105,000, and expended about $45,000 on the outdoor poor.

In the State of New York, there are 56 county poor-houses, and 6 city almshouses ; in Pennsylvania, 58 county and district almshouses; in Michigan, 45 county poor-houses; and in New England, the number of town, city, and county almshouses is nearly 600.

The whole pauper expenditure in the United States in 1874 is estimated at $15,000,000, and the average number of poor relieved 225,000.

In New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Illinois, and Wisconsin there are boards of public charities which supervise and report the expenditures for the relief of the poor, and concert measures for the prevention and suppression of pauperism. These boards are in fact poor-law boards with somewhat of the power and functions exercised by the English poor-law boards.

In many cities there are bureaus of charity which undertake to con. nect the official with private distribution of alms so that all the indigent may be judiciously aided. It will be seen from the above that the tendency in all large cities is to center the care of all the poor in competent hands, under official appointment, and not, as in former years, to place them and intrust the distribution of moneys to half a dozen different managers of institutions both private and public.

The above figures simply show the amounts appropriated by the sev. eral States for the aid of the indigent, and it should be remembered that in all of them there are many hospitals, asylums, and other like institutions supported by voluntary contributions of the charitable.

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To its glory be it said the State of Pennsylvania annually appropriates orer $1,000,000 for tbe support of homes for the orphans of her sol. diers who were killed during the late rebellion.

Before leaving this subject I beg leave to renew my recommendation of last year that all public institutions of charity, asylums, bospitals, &c., in this District, that are supported in whole or part by national or District appropriations, be placed under the control of the District gov. ernment and managed by a board to be selected from among our best citizens of both sexes, who shall have general charge; that all appropri. ations of public money shall be made in the aggregate and apportioned and disbursed by them, and that they shall at all times have the right of inspection of all charitable institutions both public and private.

ESTIMATES. The estimates for salaries and contingent expenses from December 1, 1876, to June 30, 1877, and from July 1, 1877, to June 30, 1878, are here with inclosed.

Estimate for salaries and contingent expenses from December 1, 1876, to June 30, 1877. Salaries.....

$4, 220 00 Groceries, marketing, beef, &c.... Dry goods, clothing, and shoes.. Drugs and medicines..... Hardware and stoves... Blacksmithing Lumber...

396 (0 Contingent expenses ...

720 00

25, 420 00 Estimate for salaries and contingent expenses from July 1, 1877, to June 30, 1878. Salaries......

$7,780 00 Groceries, marketing, beef, &c... Dry goods, clothing, and shoes.. Drugs and medicines.... Hardware and stoves... Blacksmithing ......... Lumber.......

1,020 Fuel..................

720 Contingent expenses.......

1,320 0

46, 000 OU EXPENDITURES. Statement of expenditures on account Washington Asylum from Norember 15, 1875, to Yo.

vember 1, 1876. Salaries ....

$5,562 34

1,779 05 Insurance...... Erection of new building .......

2,612 35 Contingent expenses, groceries, leef, marketing, drugs, lumber, hardware, blacksmithing, and sundries........

24, 198 97

34, 262 71 GEORGETOWN ALMSHOUSE.

Fuel ..........

Salaries...........................................

P lei........................... .......................................
Insurance...............................................................

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Support 01 paupers ......................................................
Insurance .......

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1,484 TV Very respectfully,

TIMOTHY LUBEY,

Commissioner. To the honorable COMMISSIONERS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. * The amount for fuel covers the amount now on hand, which is sufficient to last during the season.

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Exhibit of character, cost of maintenance, and labor performed in State reformatory and charitable institution 8.

INTENDANT'S REPORT.

WASHINGTON ASYLUM,

November 15, 1876. SIR: I have the honor to transmit the following report of the Washington Asylum from October 31, 1875, to November 15, 1876 : Number of poor in almshouse October 3!, 1875 .. Number of poor received during the year....... Number of poor born during the year ...............

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Number of poor discharged during the year ..
Number of poor died during the year.......
Number of poor in almshouse November 15, 1876........

031

154

Number of prisoners in workhouse October 31, 1875 ....
Number of prisoners received during the year......

2, 249

2,000

Number of prisoners discharged during the year .....
Number of prisoners escaped during the year........
Number of prisoners died during the year.......
Number of prisoners in workhouse November 15, 1876 ...

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Officers and employés........

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Recapitulation. Number of poor in almshouse November 15, 1875. Number of prisoners in work house November 15, 1875 Officers and employés...

Total number in the institution..... Of the number of deaths reported in the almshouse seren occurred in the small-pox hospital. I would respectfully report that in accord. ance with the order of the Commissioners of the District of Columbia, the prisoners were removed to the old jail on the 2d of May last, where they have since been confined.

The male inmates have been employed in grading and filling the streets and avenues in various parts of the city, at a considerable sar. ing to the District; while the females are employed in cleaning the building and in general house-work. A portion of the females are daily sent to the asylum, where they are employed in making clothing for the inmates of both the almshouse and work-house; also in washing, scrubbing, and keeping the main building and hospitals in a clean and bealthy condition.

The old jail, since it has been used for the work-house prisoners, has been put in the best condition that circumstances would admit; the walls have been scraped and whitewashed, new screens have been put up at the windows, stoves have been put up in the building, and the inmates have been made as comfortable as possible. As in my last re

port, I would recommend the adoption of some substantial material to be used for clothiug by the inmates of the almshouse, and to be worn by them while here, and their own clothing to be cleaned, repaired, and

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