From slavery to freedom: a history of Negro Americans

Portada
Knopf, 1974 - 548 páginas

Dentro del libro

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Review: From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African Americans

Crítica de los usuarios  - Rizky Hutapea - Goodreads

One of the most complete historical description for black American history Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - KikiUnhinged - LibraryThing

Required reading for Ethnic History class Leer comentario completo

Contenido

Land of Their Fathers
3
The African Way of Life
14
The Slave Trade
30
Derechos de autor

Otras 22 secciones no mostradas

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Acerca del autor (1974)

The son of an attorney who practiced before the U.S. Supreme Court, John Hope Franklin was born in Rentiesville, Oklahoma on January 2, 1915. He received a B. A. from Fisk University in 1935 and a master's degree in 1936 and a Ph.D. in 1941 from Harvard University. During his career in education, he taught at a numerous institutions including Brooklyn College, Harvard University, the University of Chicago, and Duke University. He also had teaching stints in Australia, China, and Zimbabwe. He has written numerous scholarly works including The Militant South, 1800-1861 (1956); Reconstruction After the Civil War (1961); The Emancipation Proclamation (1963); and The Color Line: Legacy for the 21st Century (1993). His comprehensive history From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African-Americans (1947) is generally acknowledged to be the basic survey of African American history. He received numerous awards during his lifetime including the Medal of Freedom in 1995 and the John W. Kluge Prize for the Study of Humanities in 2006. He worked with Thurgood Marshall's team of lawyers in their effort to end segregation in the 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education and participated in the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He was president of the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the Southern Historical Association, and the American Studies Association. He was also a founding member of the Black Academy of Arts and served on the U.S. Commission for UNESCO and the Committee on International Exchange of Scholars. He died of congestive heart failure on March 25, 2009 at the age of 94.

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