Wealth of Nations

Portada
Cosimo, Inc., 2007 M11 1 - 596 páginas
Adam Smith revolutionized economic theory with his 1776 work An Inquiry to the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. He proposed rules governing labor, supply, and demand; and describes division of labor, stockpiling of wealth, lending, and interest. Smith also discusses how economies lead to opulence. Wealth of Nations also offers a defense for free-market capitalism. This edition of Wealth of Nations is an abridged version edited by Harvard economics professor CHARLES JESSE BULLOCK (1869-1941) and published in 1901 by Harvard Classics, a series that offered the essential readings for anyone who wanted the functional equivalent of a liberal arts education. Any student of economics should be familiar with the concepts and laws that Smith developed, as much of economic theory is still based upon his work. Scottish economist and philosopher ADAM SMITH (1723-1790) helped set standards in the fields of political economics and moral philosophy, playing a key role in the early development of the scholarship of economics. His other writings include Essays on Philosophical Subjects.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - thcson - LibraryThing

Books 1-3 don't quite live up to the lofty reputation of this work. The parts dealing with economic theory and philosophy are quite brief and simple and the rest is just a tediously detailed ... Leer comentario completo

Crítica de los usuarios - Marcar como inadecuado

VERY - VERY GOOD

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

I
9
II
19
III
24
IV
29
V
36
VI
50
VII
58
VIII
68
XVII
301
XVIII
319
XIX
325
XX
326
XXI
348
XXII
370
XXIII
389
XXIV
392

IX
93
X
105
XI
153
XII
221
XIII
224
XIV
233
XV
270
XVI
291
XXV
407
XXVI
414
XXVII
424
XXVIII
446
XXIX
468
XXX
489
XXXI
574
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 129 - The property which every man has in his own labour, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable.
Página 10 - But if they had all wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them have made twenty, perhaps not one pin in a day...
Página 36 - Labour was the first price, the original purchase-money that was paid for all things. It was not by gold or by silver, but by labour, that all the wealth of the world was originally purchased...
Página 20 - It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest. We address ourselves, not to their humanity but to their self-love, and never talk to them of our own necessities but of their advantages.
Página 112 - In a perfectly fair lottery, those who draw the prizes ought to gain all that is lost by those who draw the blanks. In a profession where twenty fail for one that succeeds, that one ought to gain all that should have been gained by the unsuccessful twenty.
Página 36 - EVERY man is rich or poor according to the degree in which he can afford to enjoy the necessaries, conveniences, and amusements of human life.

Información bibliográfica