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is, in fact, established and at work. There are, of course, problems of establishing ourselves organizationally, establishing relations with the other departments of government, and dealing with specific policy projects. As you know, we also have some budgeting difficulties which are, in turn, causing delays in staffing and in addressing of specific policy needs. We are attempting to deal simultaneously with all these problems.

We are placing great emphasis on developing work relationships with the appropriate departments and agencies of government, with knowledgeable people in industry, and with concerned members of the public. As you know, the role of this Office is one of coordination, not operation. While the Office has considerable decision making authority, all our efforts would be counter-productive if we did not work with and through the federal departments and agencies.

We are putting particular emphasis on a cooperative and complementary relationship with the Federal Communications Commission, and that experience has been most satisfactory to date. We and the FCC will be concerned with many of the same areas, and we expect that the policy and Presidential perspective of OTP will complement rather than duplicate or compete with the regulatory focus of the Commission.

We have put particular emphasis also on developing the role of the Secretary of Commerce in support of this Office as assigned by the Executive Order. We are making quite satisfactory progress in spite of some stringent budgetary constraint. The Department of Commerce has been most cooperative in recognizing their role in support of the Office of Telecommunications Policy, and I am confident that arrangement will work out well. In particular, we have agreed with the Department of Commerce on certain principles regarding their research work program in support of this Office, and I have attached those for your information.

I am pleased to have this opportuntity to be somewhat more specific about the Office's plans and to give you a very preliminary progress report after our first two months of operation. I intend to keep the Congress well informed of our progress and plans and look forward to working with you in that regard. I hope that my future reports will be increasingly more specific and will show substantial progress in dealing with the issues before us. In particular, I hope that my future reports will be increasingly more specific and will show substantial progress in dealing with the issues before us. In particular, I hope to have within the next six months a statement of what the de facto policies of the government are in the communications area; how they relate to pending and foreseeable issues; and what needs to be done to close the gaps to bring about some cohesion in overall policy. As soon as this review is completed, I would hope to have the opportunity t discus it with interested members of the Congress. In the meantime, if we can be of any assistance, please let me know. Sincerely,

CLAY T. WHITEHEAD. Enclosure.

COORDINATION ARRANGEMENTS BETWEEN OTP AND DOC 1. The Director, OTP, should approve the work statements for all major contract studies executived in support of OTP responsibilities.

2. The Director, OTP, should be provided at least 15 days in advance of any public release, the results of all studies undertaken by DOC in support of OTP responsibilities.

3. Requests from the Director, OTP, for information or analyses will receive priority over other tasks undertaken by DOC in the spectrum management area.

4. The Director, OTP, shall keep the Secretary of Commerce fully informed on current and planned programs and activities, and the Secretary shall afford the Director the opportunity to review in adrance DOC submissions to OMB and the Congress that are to be undertaken in support of OTP.

5. There should be free and frequent informal contact between the staff of OTP and the staff of DOC in the telecommunications area, except that any changes in the scope and activities of either office shall be coordinated only by the Director of OTP and an appropriate official of the Department.

6. The Director, OTP, and the senior DOC official in the telecommunications areas should meet frequently and periodically to assure that the programs and activities of the two offices are in accord.

Senator PASTORE. Is there anyone in this room who desires to speak for or against this nominee?

There being silence the meeting is adjourned.
(Whereupon, at 9:40 a.m., the committee was adjourned.)

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ADM. WILLARD J. SMITH, OF MICHIGAN, TO BE ASSIST

ANT SECRETARY OF TRANSPORTATION FOR SAFETY AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1970

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE,

Washington, D.C. The committee met at 9:20 a.m. in room 1114, New Senate Office Building, Hon. William B. Spong, Jr., presiding.

Present: Senators Spong, Cotton, and Griffin.

OPENING STATEMENT OF SENATOR SPONG

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Senator SPONG. The committee will come to order.

The first order of business this morning is the nomination of Willard J. Smith, of Michigan, to be an Assistant Secretary of Transportation.

We have with us this morning a member of this committee, Senator Griffin of Michigan, and I believe he will introduce Admiral Smith to the committee.

Senator GRIFFIN. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.

It is a real pleasure to introduce a native son of the State of Michigan who has been nominated for this important post of Assistant Secretary for Safety and Consumer Affairs.

Although he was born at Suttons Bay, Mich., which is not very far away from my hometown, he has been a very busy person and has spent a great deal of time away from Michigan during a long and distinguished career in the U.S."Coast Guard. He has served in many different capacities, including the Commandant of Cadets at the Coast Guard Academy, as well as the Commanding Officer of the entire Coast Guard.

I want to emphasize the great role and important role that the Coast Guard plays insofar as safety is concerned. Here is a man who has great experience and expertise so far as safety is concerned, and who, I might add, from a personal acquaintance is a very compassionati person. I know he is very much concerned about the problems of people in general, and that would include consumers.

I am convinced that he has an excellent background and I commend him to the committee.

Senator SPONG. Thank you, Senator Griffin.

Senator Hart of Michigan will not be here this morning, but has expressed his approval of this nomination.

I am going to place in the record at this time the biographical sketch of Admiral Smith, and also say to the committee that we have in the file a financial statement which Admiral Smith has presented in connection with this, and this will be available to any of the members of the committee who wish to see it.

(The biography follows:)

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF ADM. WILLARD J. SMITH, U.S. COAST GUARD

COMMANDANT (RETIRED) Willard John Smith was born at Suttons Bay, Michigan, on May 14, 1910, the son of Emma and Oscar Smith, who retired from the U.S. Coast Guard as a Commissioned Warrant Officer. Admiral Smith was graduated from Charlevoix High School, Mich., in 1927, and attended the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor for three years.

He entered the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, New London, Conn., with an appointment as Cadet in August 1930, graduating with a commission as Ensign on May 15, 1933. Subsequently, he advanced in rank to Lieutenant (jg), May 15, 1936; Lieutenant, August 5, 1939; Lieut. Commander October 2, 1942; Commander, January 1, 1944; Captain, November 1, 1955; Rear Admiral, July 1, 1962; and four-star Admiral, June 1, 1966.

He served his first assignment as a line officer on board the Coast Guard Cutter SARANAC, based at Galveston, Texas. Stationed next at Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, D.C., he served as Aide to the Commandant from November 1936 to May 1939. From there he was assigned to flight training at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, and received his wings on June 14, 1940.

WORLD WAR II

His first assignment in the aviation branch of the Service was in connection with the construction and commissioning of the Coast Guard Air Station at San Francisco. While attached to that station until February 194, he was temporarily assigned to duty at the beginning of World War II with Navy Patrol Squadron VP-44 conducting anti-submarine patrols in the Pacific. In addition, during the summers of 1941 and 1942, he commanded an aircraft conducting urgently needed aerial surveys in Alaska. He received a Letter of Commendation from the Commandant of the Coast Guard for landing a PBY plane in open sea 200 miles southwest of San Francisco on February 13, 1943, to remove an officer from a naval vessel to a naval hospital in time to save the patient's life. During the remainder of the war, he again served as Aide to the Commandant of the Coast Guard.

POSTWAR From October 1946 to June 1948, he commanded the Coast Guard Air Station at Traverse City, Mich. He then returned to Coast Guard Headquarters to serve as Assistant Chief, Aviation Division for two years.

He was assigned as student at the Armed Forces Staff College at Norfolk, Va., from August 1950 to January 1951. That was followed by several weeks of instruction in Loran operations at the Aids to Navigation School, Coast Guard Training Station, Groton, Conn., and an assignment in April 1951, as Commanding Officer of the Coast Guard Depot on Guam Island and as Commander, Western Pacific Section. In mid 1952 were added the duties of Commander, Marianas Section.

From September 1952 to August 1954, he commanded the Coast Guard icebreaker Mackinaw, based at Cheybogan, Mich., a vessel specially designed for icebreaking and aids to navigation work to help shipping commerce in the Great Lakes. The next three years marked his fourth tour of duty at Coast Guard Headquarters, this time as Chief, Administrative Management Division.

In June 1957, he became Commandant of the Cadets at the Coast Guard Academy. In July 1960, he was reassigned to duty as Chief, Operations Division of the 13th Coast Guard District, Seattle, Wash.

By nomination of the President on January 31, 1962, and approval of the Senate, the then Captain Smith was appointed to rank as permanent Rear Admiral from July 1, 1962. At that time he left Seattle to assume the post of Superintendent of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy (relieving retiring RADU Stephen H. Evans, USCG).

Two extraordinary occasions highlighted his tenure of office at the Academy. In August 1962, ADM Smith brought the Academy's 295-ft., three-masted training bark Eagle on her first trip to Washington, D.C., upon returning with that vessel from a Cadet Practice Squadron Cruise to Europe. At that time he was host on board the bark to such distinguished visitors as the late President John F. Kennedy, the then Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, various members of Congress, and Admiral Edwin J. Roland, Commandant of the Coast Guard.

He also cooperated in the planning of Operation Sail, July 1964, involving the massing of many of the world's remaining tall masted windjammers in a spectacular marine parade in New York Harbor, led by the Coast Guard Academy bark Eagle as host ship.

Admiral Smith was awarded the Legion of Merit for his service at the Academy. He was cited for making major changes up-dating the Academy curriculum to keep in step with modern advances in technology and management. Also, for proposing and developing an electives program which provides incentives and opportunities for cadets to broaden their education-improving their capabilities as future Coast Guard officers, and for vigorously supervising a building program of improving laboratory, classroom, and other facilities.

Admiral Smith's tour of duty at the Academy was terminated in July 1965, with his transfer to Cleveland, Ohio to the post of Commander, 9th Coast Guard District which covers Coast Guard operations in the Great Lakes region.

Admiral Smith was appointed Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard with rank of full four-star Admiral effective June 1, 1966. He relieved retiring Admiral Edwin J. Roland, USCG, on May 31st at formal change-of-command ceremonies held on board the 327-ft. Coast Guard Cutter Campbell (WHEC-32) at the Navy Yard, Washington, D.C.

Admiral Smith retired at the end of his four-year term as Commandant on June 1, 1970. On that day he turned over his duties to Adm. Chester R. Bender, U'SCG, at change-of-command ceremonies held on board the 378–ft. Cutter Gallatin (WHEC-721) from New York, at the Navy Yard, Washington, D.C. Standing alongside with additional guests on board was the 210-ft. Cutter Alert (WMEC630 ) from Cape May, N.J. During these ceremonies Admiral Smith was presented a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Distinguished Service Medal for exceptional meritorious service for his responsibilities as Commandant by Secretary of Transportation John A. Volpe.

Admiral Smith received his First Distinguished Service Medal for meritorious achievement in assisting in the formation of the newly created Department of Transportaton, effected April 1, 1967, which included the Coast Guard. The presentation was made by Under-Secretary of the Treasury Joseph W. Barr.

Prior to retiring, Admiral Smith was honored in ceremonies at the Embassy of Italy (May 28, 1970) at which he was presented the Order of Merit of the Republic of Italy (Ordine al Merito della Republica Italiana) by Ambassador Edgido Ortono.

In addition to the Legion of Merit for his tour of duty as Superintendent of the Academy, Admiral Smith's other awards include the following World War II campaign medals and ribbons: American Defense with sea clasp; American Area ; Asiatic-Pacific Area ; World War II Victory. He also has the National Defense Service Ribbon, the Command-at-Sea Insigne, and the Expert Pistol Shot Medal.

He received the American Legion Distinguished Service Medal in November of 1969.

Admiral Smith's wife is the former Harriet A. Lary of Los Angeles, Cal. They have one daughter, Lary, and one son, Jeffrey.

Senator Spong. Senator Cotton, do you have any questions?
Senator COTTON. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I have no particular questions for Admiral Smith. He is a long time friend of this committee, and this committee is well acquainted with Admiral Smith. We have known him through the years and admire him greatly. I cannot imagine anybody on the committee not being appreciative of the opportunity to vote to confirm him.

There is one matter, however, on which I would like to seek clarification. It concerns the duties of the new Assistant Secretaryship to which Admiral Smith has been nominated and most particularly consumer affairs.

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I am going to place in the record at this time the biographical sketch of Admiral Smith, and also say to the committee that we have in the file a financial statement which Admiral Smith has presented in connection with this, and this will be available to any of the members of the committee who wish to see it.

(The biography follows:)

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF ADM. WILLARD J. SMITH, U.S. COAST GUARD

COMMANDANT (RETIRED) Willard John Smith was born at Suttons Bay, Michigan, on May 14, 1910, the son of Emma and Oscar Smith, who retired from the U.S. Coast Guard as a Commissioned Warrant Officer. Admiral Smith was graduated from Charlevoix High School, Mich., in 1927, and attended the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor for three years.

He entered the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, New London, Conn., with an appointment as Cadet in August 1930, graduating with a commission as Ensign on May 15, 1933. Subsequently, he advanced in rank to Lieutenant (jg), May 15, 1936; Lieutenant, August 5, 1939; Lieut. Commander, October 2, 1942; Commander, January 1, 1944; Captain, November 1, 1955; Rear Admiral, July 1, 1962; and four-star Admiral, June 1, 1966.

He served his first assignment as a line officer on board the Coast Guard Cutter SARANAC, based at Galveston, Texas. Stationed next at Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, D.C., he served as Aide to the Commandant from November 1936 to May 1939. From there he was assigned to flight training at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, and received his wings on June 14, 1940.

WORLD WAR II

His first assignment in the aviation branch of the Service was in connection with the construction and commissioning of the Coast Guard Air Station at San Francisco. While attached to that station until February 19H, he was temporarily assigned to duty at the beginning of World War II with Navy Patrol Squadron VP-44 conducting anti-submarine patrols in the Pacific. In addition, during the summers of 1941 and 1942, he commanded an aircraft conducting urgently needed aerial surveys in Alaska. He received a Letter of Commendation from the Commandant of the Coast Guard for landing a PBY plane in open sea 200 miles southwest of San Francisco on February 13, 1943, to remove an officer from a naval vessel to a naval hospital in time to save the patient's life. During the remainder of the war, he again served as Aide to the Commandant of the Coast Guard.

POSTWAR

From October 1946 to June 1948, he commanded the Coast Guard Air Station at Traverse City, Mich. He then returned to Coast Guard Headquarters to serve as Assistant Chief, Aviation Division for two years.

He was assigned as student at the Armed Forces Staff College at Norfolk, Va., from August 1950 to January 1951. That was followed by several weeks of instruction in Loran operations at the Aids to Navigation School, Coast Guard Training Station, Groton, Conn., and an assignment in April 1951, as Commanding Officer of the Coast Guard Depot on Guam Island and as Commander, Western Pacific Section. In mid 1952 were added the duties of Commander, Marianas Section.

From September 1952 to August 1954, he commanded the Coast Guard ice. breaker Mackinaw. based at Cheybogan, Mich., a vessel specially designed for icebreaking and aids to navigation work to help shipping commerce in the Great Lakes. The next three years marked his fourth tour of duty at Coast Guard Headquarters, this time as Chief, Administrative Management Division.

In June 1957, he became Commandant of the Cadets at the Coast Guard Academy. In July 1960, he was reassigned to duty as Chief, Operations Division of the 13th Coast Guard District, Seattle, Wash.

By nomination of the President on January 31, 1962, and approval of the Senate, the then Captain Smith was appointed to rank as permanent Rear Admiral from July 1, 1962. At that time he left Seattle to assume the post of Superintendent of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy (relieving retiring RADM Stephen H. Evans, USCG).

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