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LIFE

OF

ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

PRESENTING

HIS EARLY HISTORY, POLITICAL CAREER, AND SPEECHES IN

AND OUT OF CONGRESS; ALSO, A GENERAL

VIEW OF HIS POLICY AS

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HISTORY OF HIS EVENTFUL ADMINISTRATION, AND OF THE

SCENES ATTENDANT UPON HIS TRAGIC

AND LAMENTED DEMISE.

BY

JOSEPH H. BARRETT,

COMMISSIONER OF PENSIONS, WASHINGTON, D. 0.

PUBLISHERS:

MOORE, WILSTACH & BALDWIN,

25 West Fourth Street, Cincinnati.
New York, 60 Walker Street.

1865.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1860, by

MOORE, WILSTACH, KEYS & CO.,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern

District of Ohio.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 18G4, by

MOORE, WILSTACH & BALDWIN,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern

District of Ohio.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1865, by

MOORE, WILSTACH & BALDWIN,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern

District of Ohio.

P'REITA.OIll.

The first part of the sketch of Mr. Lincoln's life herewith presented to the public, was mainly prepared for the press in June, 1860—only slight modifications having been made, and brief additions, so as to embrace the period terminating with his inau* guration. This portion of the work embodies a condensed view of Mr. Lincoln's speeches, which can not fail to interest the attentive student, who seeks for information concerning his early political life. The second part, after a summary of National events immediately preceding March 4, 1861, gives a condensed history of Mr. Lincoln's Administration, including a narrative of military operations, down to the present time. The most important public papers, addresses and occasional letters of the President, will also be found in the following pages.

It has been the fortune of Mr. Lincoln to be called to the Chief Magistracy, at an epoch when a long-maturing conspiracy for the dismemberment of the Union has culminated in a war of unprecedented magnitude. The President, tried as none of his predecessors ever were, has so wisely exercised his power as to command the hearty support of all loyal men at home, and the admiration of enlightened thinkers, unperverted by anti-democratic prejudice in Europe. It was a late member of the British Parliament who pointed out single passages from an address of Mr. Lincoln, as worth "all that Burke ever wrote." His able statesmanship has justified the confidence of the people, while his sterling qualities of heart, his humane sympathies, his purity of life, and his power of winning the love and trust of his countrymen, have contributed to deepen the earnestness of the popular wish for his continuance, during another term, in the high office he providentially fills.

It is hardly to be hoped that the present attempt to treat so wide a subject, within so small a compass, will satisfy all readers. Many minor details, of special interest to individuals, have necessarily been omitted. Some accounts of military and naval undertakings, which might, of themselves, have filled an entire volume, have been given with perhaps a disappointing brevity. It mustsuffice to say, here, that no pains have been spared—as no requisite facilities for obtaining correct data have been lacking—to make the work not only trustworthy and complete ii regard to matters of salient interest, but also as acceptable as possible to all classes of loyal readers.

Washington, D. C, May 14, 1864 J. H. B.

The Third Part of this work comprises the events of the last year of Mr. Lincoln's life, with his public papers and addresses of the same period, as well as many letters and speeches of an earlier date, not given in the previous parts. The summary of the closing campaigns of the war has been prepare] with care, as well as the political history of the time. No year of the nation's existence has been more memorable than that commencing on the 1st of May, 1864. Before its close, a gigantic rebellion was finally crushed, and our great and good President, after witnessing the triumph of his labors, fell a martyr to the cause he had so firmly upheld through the darkest hours. Would that the work were more worthy the theme. No name ? ill be more sacred in our country's annals, or more perpetual in the memory of the world, than that of Abraham Lincoln.

Washington, D. C, July 20, 1865. J. H. B

CONTENTS.

PART I.

CHAPTER I.

Ancestry of Abraham Lincoln—Their [Residence in Pennsylvania and Virginia—

His GrandfVher Crosses the Alleghanies to join Boone and his Associates—

"The Dark *nfl Bloody Ground"—His Violent Death—Hie Widow Settles in

Washington County—Thomas Lincoln, his Son, Marries and Locates near

Hodgcnville—Birth of Abraham Lincoln—LaRue County—Early Life and

Training in Kentucky 9

CHAPTER II.

Removal from Kentucky—An Emigrant Journey—The Forests of Southern Indi-

ana—New Home—Indiana in 1816—Slavery and Free Labor—Young Lincoln at

His Work—His Schools and Schoolmasters—Self-Education—A Characteristic

Incident—A ^uaintance with River Life—His First Trip to New Orleans as a

Flatboatman—Death of His Mother—His Father's Second Marriage—Recollec-

tions of an Early Settler — Close of an Eventful Period in Young Lincoln's

History 21

CHAPTER III.

The French Settlements—The North-West—The Advance of Emigration—Four

Great States Founded—North and South in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois—Senti-

ments of Southern Emigrants—The First Emigrations—A Coincidence of Dates—

Mordecai ar. 1 Josiah Lincoln—Removal to Illinois—Settlement on the San-

gamon, in Macon County—Locality Described—Abrahtm Lincoln Engaged in

Splitting Rails—Removal of His Father—He Settles in Coles County—Abraham

Lincoln makes another Trip as a Flatboatman—Becomes Clerk in a Store on

ilis Return—Postmaster at New Salem 21

CHAPTER IV.

Breaking Out of the Black Hawk War—The Invasion of 1831—The Rock-river

Country Threatened—Prompt Action of Gov. Reynolds—Retreat of Black

Hawk—Treay of 1804—Bad Faith of the Indians—Invasion of 1832—Volun-

teers Called ±'or—Abraham Lincoln one ef a Company from Menard County—

He is chosen Captain—Rendezvous at Beardstown—Hard Marches across the

Country to Oquawka, Prophetstown, and Dixon—Expected Battle Avoided by

the Enemy—Discontent among Volunteers—They are Disbanded—Captain Lin-

coln Reman; s Volunteering for Another Term of Service—Skirmishing Fights—

Arrival of New Levies—Encounter at Kellogg's Grove—Black Hawk at Four

Lakes—He Retreats—Battle on the Wisconsin—Hastens Forward to the Mis-

sissippi—Battle of Bad-ax—End of Lincoln's First Campaign—Autobiographic

Note 37

CHAPTER V.

\ New Period in Mr. Lincoln's Life—His Political Opinions—Clay and Jackson—

Mr. Lincoln a Candidate for Representative—Election in 1834—Illinois Strongly

Democratic—Mr. Lincoln as a Surveyor—Land Speculation Mania—Mr. Lin-

coln's First Appearance in the Legislature—Banks and Internal Improve-

ments—Whig Measures Democratically Botched—First Meeting of Lincoln

with Douglas—The Latter Seeks an Office of the Legislature, and Gets it—Mr.

Lincoln Re-elected in 1*36—Mr. Douglas also a Member of the House—Distin-

guished Associates—Internal Improvements Again—Mr. Lincoln's Views on

Slavery—The Capital Removed to Springfield—The New Metropolis—Revulsion

of 1837—Mr. Lincoln Chosen for a Third Term—John Calhoun, of Lecompton

Memory—Lincoln the Whig Leader, and Candidate for Speaker—Close Vote—

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