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MANUFACTURERS OF

HALLET, DAVIS & CO., Grand, Parlor-Grand, and Square

PIANO-FORTES.

A GOLD MEDAL was awarded these Pianos at the last exhibition of the Massachusetts Charitable

Mechanic Association, Boston; also a Silver Medal, FIRST PREMIUM, for PARLOR-GRAND PIANO-FORTE; also a Silver Medal for a VERY EXCELLENT SQUARE PIANO-FORTE, and a Silver Medal, highest premium, for superior workmanship. The following are extracts from the Report:

“The Grand Piano-Fortes of Messrs. Hallet, Davis & Co. have many very admirable features. They have a great body of tone, and are specially commended for their fine touch and their beautiful singing quality.

“The Square Piano of the same makers, No. 12790, was very much admired. It has great fulness, depth and mellowness of tone, and, in certain grave styles of music, would probably be unexcelled by any similar instrument on exhibition.”

Besides the above, THIRTY-TWO FIRST PREMIUMS have been awarded our Pianos, – nine for Grands and Best Parlor-Grands. Our Pianos are with NEW scales and SUPERIOR action, and we guarantee PERFECT SATISPACTION. Every Instrument is Warranted for Five Years. Second-hand Pianos taken in exchange for new. Illustrated catalogues sent free to any address desired.

WAREROOMS, 272 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON.

"The most Thorough and Scientific--the most successful and the Best."

GREENLEAF'S NEW MATHEMATICAL COURSE.

NEW ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA; A SIMPLE, EASY, AND COMPREHENSIVE WORK.

NEW HIGHER ALGEBRA;

A THOROUGH ANALYTICAL TREATISE, NEITHER TOO BRIEF NOR

TOO EXTENDED FOR ADVANCED CLASSES.

No works of the kind have ever been more promptly introduced into the best schools in all parts of the country, or have been more highly recommended. The following

DISTINGUISHED EDUCATORS, among numerous others, either use or commend one or both of these new books.

BARNAS SEARS, President of Brown University, R. I.
8. 8. GREENE, Professor in Brown University, R. I.
J. D. RUNKLE, Professor in Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston,
J. TATLOCK, Professor of Mathematics, Williamstown College, Mass.
JAMES CLARK, Prefect of College of Holy Cross, Mass.
M. K. PETTY, Professor of Mathematics, University of Vermont.
J. M. VAN VLECK, Professor of Mathematics, Wesleyan University, Conn.
BROTHER PATRICK, President of Manhattan College, N. Y.
A. P. STONE, late President of American Institute of Instruction, Me.
G. H. CHRISTY, Professor Western University, Pa.
T. R. BAKER, Professor of Mathematics, State Farm School, Pa.
DAVID N. CAMP, Principal State Normal School, Conn.
D. B. HAGAR, Principal of Salem State Normal School, Mass.
WILLIAM F. PHELP8, Principal of State Normal School, Min.
WILLIAM K. CREERY, Principal of City Normal School, Baltimore.
GEORGE GANNETT, Principal of Pemberton-Square School, Boston.
H. M. PEIRCE, Principal of Rutgers Institute, New York.
GEO, 8. JONES, Professor Quaker-City Business College, Philadelphia.
J. B. CHASE, Professor of Mathematics, Collegiate Home Institute, New Haven,
N. H. MORRISON, Principal of Y. L. Academy, Baltimore.
EDWARD WYMAN, President of City University, Bt. Louis.
C. 8. PENNELL, Principal of Mary Institute, St. Louis.

E. B. NEELY, Superintendent of Schools, St. Joseph, Mo.
A popularity so rare and exceptional must be regarded as

A SUFFICIENT TEST OF MERIT,

ROBERT S. DAVIS & CO.,
Please send for Catalogue. 45 Washington Street, Boston,

Persons desiring instruction in ELOCUTION can pursue a Course of PRIVATE EXERCISES with me, at any time convenient to themselves, during the months of June, July, August, and September.

Convenient BOARDING can be had in the vicinity of the Lancaster Station, on the Worcester and Nashua Railroad.

TERMS OF TUITION,—Daily Lessons of One Hour, $1.00 each.

WILLIAM RUSSELL,

Instructor in Elocution in the State Teachers' Institutes,

LANCASTER, MASS. 20th March, 1866.

State Normal Schools. .

The normal Schools at Framingham and Salem are designed for the education of female teachers; those at Bridgewater and Westfield for the education of teachers of both sexes. The course extends over two years, of two terms of about twenty weeks each, for all except those who have been graduated at a college, – for whom the course covers only one term. Any person entering either of the schools, with extraordinary preparation, may obtain a degree in onehalf or three-fourths of the time usually required.

To those who intend to teach in the public schools in Massachusetts, wherever they may have previously resided, tuition is free; and to pupils from this State, pecuniary aid is also given, when needed. Most of the text-books used are furnished from the fibraries of the several schools.

The public examinations, at the end of the current term, will take place as follows:
AL SALEM, on Wednesday, Jan. 31, 1866.
At FRAMINGHAM, on Tuesday, Feb. 6th, 1866.
At BRIDGEWATER, on Wednesday, Feb. 14th, 1866.
At WESTFIELD, on Wednesday, Feb. 28th, 1866.
The Examinations for admission, at the next term,
At WESTFIELD, on Wednesday, March 28th, 1866, commencing at 9 o'clock, A.M.
At SALEM, on Wednesday, Feb. 28th, 1866, beginning at 9 o'clock, A.M.
At FRAMINGHAM, on Wednesday, March 7th, 1866, beginning at 9 o'clock, A.M.
At BRIDGEWATER, on Wednesday, March 14th, 1866, beginning at 9 o'clock, A.M.

At each examination, in all the schools, reading will receive particular attention, and the Lee prizes for excellence in reading will be conferred upon the best readers. For circulars, or for further information, application may be made to the principals of the several schools.

The following are the conditions on which the Lee prizes may be received:

To deserve a prize, the candidate must possess naturally, or have gained by discipline, 1. A fulness of voice which shall enable him to fill, without apparent effort, the room occupied by the class. 2. Perfect distinctness of articulation, giving complete expression to every vocal element, and letting the sound of each word fall clearly upon the ear of the hearer, especially at the end of every sentence; 3. Correct pronunciation, with that roundness and fulness of enun. ciation, and sweetness and mellowness of tone, which only can satisfy and charm the ear and reach the heart; and 4. Just emphasis, clearly marked, but not overstrained. 5. He must read naturally, and with spirit, avoiding all affectation and mannerism, and keeping at the same time clear of the lifeless monotony common in schools, and of the excess of emphasis which so often characterizes poor declamation. 6. In the reading of poetry, his tones must be those of unaffected emotion, free at once from the tameness of prose, and from the too measured cadences of verse.

Payson Dunter Serilmesi

Scribner's

Penmanship

PRESENT THEIR COMPLIMENTS TO THE

TEACHERS OF THE UNITED STATES, and beg to inform them, that being desirous to keep the system IN ADVANCE OF ALL OTHERS, as by the unanimous verdict of the Country it always has been, they are now issuing AN ENTIRELY New EDITION, REVISED, RE-ARRANGED, AND IMPROVED, and embracing the combined results of the experience of our talented authors.

THIS SYSTEM COMPRISES

1st. A SERIES OF COPY BOOKS. Common School Series, BUSINESS Series, Ladies' Series, ORNAMENTAL Book, and Drill Book.

2d. OBLIQUE LINES. For Teaching the Proper Slope in Writing.

3d. A MANUAL OF PENMANSHIP. Containing a Full Statement of Payson, Dunton & Scribner's Celebrated Method of Teaching.

4th. NATIONAL WRITING TABLETS. Fac-similes of the Principles and Letters, thoroughly analyzed, as written of large size on the Blackboard, containing also Exercises for Drill and Class-Teaching.

5th. A SYSTEM OF BOOK-KEEPING. In which the Day-Book. Journal, and Ledger are presented in written form. This is not merely a Series of COPY BOOKS, but a METHOD OF INSTRUCTION. While it directs and exemplifies to the Pupil what is to be written, it at the same time

instructs the Teacher how to conduct the exercises successfully.

STANDING PRE-EMINENT ABOVE ALL OTHERS IN Originality, Simplicity, and Mathematical Exactness and Beauty, it is expressly adapted to the Schools of the United States, and comprehends every thing requisite for the convenience of the Teacher, and the needs of the Scholar.

So widely known is this system, and such is its popularity, that the initials

P. D. & S.

are as universally understood at sight as are the letters, U. S. A.
Its Immense Popularity arises from, 1. Its Completeness. 2. Its Simplicity. 3. Its
Variety. 4. Its Progressiveness. 5. Its Enterprise. 6. Its Beauty, 7. Its Originality.
Its Transcendent Superiority over all others as a SYSTEM FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL

INSTRUCTION, CANNOT BE DENIED.
The Best Teachers Assert it! Experience has Proved it!

CROSBY & AINSWORTH, Please send for Specimens and Circulars.

117 Washington St., Boston.

FOR TEACHERS.

AN ARRANGEMENT HAS BEEN EFFECTED BY WHICH

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The American Journal of Education, subprintion $4.00 Massachusetts Teacher,

1.50 Student and Schoolmate,

1.50 $7.00

WILL BE FURNISHED

At the low price of $5.50 for the three.

These magazines are all of great value to those interested in education. The first is conducted by Hon. Henry Barnard, and is a standard and valuable work.

The second enters upon its 19th volume under an experienced and talented editor, securing that unity which is so desirable in an educational journal.

The third and last has already commended itself to teachers, through its healthy tone and invaluable aids to the teacher in its speeches, marked for declamation and spirited dialogues. A page of music usually accompanies each number.

The present inducements will enable all to possess themselves of three valuable works at a very low price.

ADDRESS

G. R. MARBLE, Secretary,

119 Washington Street,

BOSTON.

The Educational Works of the Hon. Henry Barnard are for sale as above, and all orders will be promptly attended to.

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