Tait's Edinburgh Magazine

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William Tait, Christian Isobel Johnstone
W. Tait, 1853
 

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Página 118 - TO HELEN Helen, thy beauty is to me Like those Nicean barks of yore, That gently, o'er a perfumed sea, The weary, way-worn wanderer bore To his own native shore. On desperate seas long wont to roam, Thy hyacinth hair, thy classic face, Thy Naiad airs have brought me home To the glory that was Greece, And the grandeur that was Rome. Lo! in yon brilliant window-niche How statue-like I see thee stand! The agate lamp within thy hand, Ah ! Psyche, from the regions which Are Holy Land! ISRAFEL And the...
Página 21 - We feel the cold which benumbed, and listen to the winds which pierced them. Beneath us is the Rock, on which New England received the feet of the Pilgrims. We seem even to behold them, as they struggle with the elements, and, with toilsome efforts, gain the shore. We listen to the chiefs in council; we see the unexampled exhibition of female fortitude and resignation; we hear the whisperings of youthful impatience, and we see, what a painter of our own has also represented by his pencil, chilled...
Página 21 - We have come to this Rock, to record here our homage for our Pilgrim Fathers; our sympathy in their sufferings; our gratitude for their labors; our admiration of their virtues; our veneration for their piety; and our attachment to those principles of civil and religious liberty, which they encountered the dangers of the ocean, the storms of heaven, the violence of savages, disease, exile, and famine, to enjoy and to establish.
Página 45 - For woman is not undevelopt man But diverse: could we make her as the man, Sweet love were slain : his dearest bond is this Not like to like, but like in difference. Yet in the long years liker must they grow ; The man be more of woman, she of man ; He gain in sweetness and in moral height, Nor lose the wrestling thews that throw the world ; She mental breadth, nor fail in childward care, Nor lose the childlike in the larger mind; Till at the last she set herself to man, Like perfect music unto noble...
Página 132 - L'amour que je sens pour cette jeune veuve Ne ferme point mes yeux aux défauts qu'on lui treuve, Et je suis, quelque ardeur qu'elle m'ait pu donner, Le premier à les voir, comme à les condamner. Mais, avec tout cela, quoi que je puisse faire, Je confesse mon faible; elle a l'art de me plaire...
Página 361 - That all heritable offices, superiorities, heritable jurisdictions, offices for life and jurisdictions for life be reserved to the owners thereof as rights of property, in the same manner as they are now enjoyed by the laws of Scotland, notwithstanding this treaty.
Página 142 - And wi' the lave ilk merry morn Could rank my rig and lass, Still shearing, and clearing The tither stocked raw, Wi' claivers, an' haivers, Wearing the day awa : Ev'n then a wish, (I mind its power,) A wish that to my latest hour Shall strongly heave my breast ; That I for poor auld Scotland's sake, Some usefu' plan, or beuk could make, Or sing a sang at least.
Página 301 - English constitution; and that it is an essential unalterable right in nature, ingrafted into the British constitution as a fundamental law, and ever held sacred and irrevocable by the subjects within the realm, — that what a man has honestly acquired, is absolutely his own; which he may freely give, but which cannot be taken from him without his consent.
Página 45 - Till at the last she set herself to man, Like perfect music unto noble words: And so these twain, upon the skirts of Time, Sit side by side, full-summ'd in all their powers, Dispensing harvest, sowing the To-be, Self-reverent each and reverencing each, Distinct in individualities, But like each other ev'n as those who love.
Página 132 - Et je suis, quelque ardeur qu'elle m'ait pu donner, Le premier à les voir, comme à les condamner. Mais, avec tout cela, quoi que je puisse faire, Je confesse mon foible; elle a l'art de me plaire : J'ai beau voir ses défauts , et j'ai beau l'en blâmer, En dépit qu'on en ait, elle se fait aimer...

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