Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

RULE III. If, when steam vessels are approaching each other, either vessel fails to understand the course or intention of the other, from any cause, the vessel so in doubt shall immediately signify the same by giving several short and rapid blasts, not less than four, of the steam whistle.

RULE V. Whenever a steam vessel is nearing a short bend or curve in the channel, where, from the height of the banks or other cause, a steam vessel approaching from the opposite direction can not be seen for a distance of half a mile, such steam vessel, when she shall have arrived within half a mile of such curve or bend, shall give a signal by one long blast of the steam whistle, which signal shall be answered by a similar blast, given by any approaching steam vessel that may be within hearing. Should such signal be so answered by a steam vessel upon the farther side of such bend, then the usual signals for meeting and passing shall immediately be given and answered ; but, if the first alarm signal of such vessel be not answered, she is to consider the channel clear and govern herself accordingly.

When steam vessels are moved from their docks or berths, and other boats are liable to pass from any direction toward them, they shall give the same signal as in the case of vessels meeting at a bend, but immediately after clearing the berths so as to be fully in sight they shall be governed by the steering and sailing rules.

RULE VIII. When steam vessels are running in the same direction, and the vessel which is astern shall desire to pass on the right or starboard hand of the vessel ahead, she shall give one short blast of the steam whistle as a signal of such desire, and if the vessel ahead answers with one blast, she shall put helm to port; or if she shall desire to pass on the left or port side of the vessel ahead, she shall give two short blasts of the steam whistle as a signal of such desire, and if the vessel ahead answer with two blasts, shall put her helm to starboard; or if the vessel ahead does not think it safe for the vessel astern to attempt to pass at that point, she shall immediately signify the same by giving several short and rapid blasts of the steam whistle, not less than four and under no circumstances shall the vessel astern attempt to pass the vessel ahead until such time as they have reached a point where it can be safely done, when said vessel ahead shall signify her willingness by blowing the proper signals. The vessel ahead shall in no case attempt to cross the bow or crowd upon the course of the passing vessel.

RULE IX. The whistle signals provided in the rules under this article, for steam vessels meeting, passing, or overtaking, are never to be used except when steamers are in sight of each other, and the course and position of each can be determined in the daytime by a sight of the vessel itself, or by night by seeing its signal lights. In fog, mist, falling snow, or heavy rainstorms, when vessels can not so see each other, fog signals only must be given.

Art. 19. When two steam vessels are crossing, so as to involve risk of collision, the vessel which has the other on her own starboard side shall keep out of the way of the other.

ART. 20. When a steam vessel and a sailing vessel are proceeding in such directions as to involve risk of collision, the steam vessel shall keep out of the way of the sailing vessel.

ART. 21. Where, by any of these rules, one of the two vessels is to keep out of the way, the other shall keep her course and speed.

ART. 22. Every vessel which is directed by these rules to keep out of the way of another vessel shall, if the circumstances of the case admit, avoid crossing ahead of the other.

ART. 23. Every steam vessel which is directed by these rules to keep out of the way of another vessel shall, on approaching her, if necessary, slacken her speed or stop or reverse.

ART. 24. Notwithstanding anything contained in these rules every vessel, overtaking any other, shall keep out of the way of the overtaken vessel.

Every vessel coming up with another vessel from any direction more than two points abaft her beam, that is, in such a position, with reference to the vessel which she is overtaking that at night she would be unable to see either of that vessel's side-lights, shall be deemed to be an overtaking vessel : and no subsequent alteration of the bearing between the two vessels shall make the overtaking vessel a crossing vessel within the meaning of these rules, or relieve her of the duty of keeping clear of the overtaken vessel until she is finally past and clear.

As by day the overtaking vessel can not always know with certainty whether she is forward of or abaft this direction from the other vessel she should, if in doubt, assume that she is an overtaking vessel and keep out of the way.

ART. 25. In narrow channels every steam vessel shall, when it is safe and practicable, keep to that side of the fairway or mid-channel which lies on the starboard side of such vessel.

ART. 26. Sailing vessels under way shall keep out of the way of sailing vessels or boats fishing with nets, or lines, or trawls. This rule shall not give to any vessel or boat engaged in fishing the right of obstructing a fairway used by vessels other than fishing vessels or boats.

ART. 27. In obeying and construing these rules due regard shall be had to all dangers of navigation and collision, and to any special circumstances which may render a departure from the above rules necessary in order to avoid immediate danger.

SOUND SIGNALS FOR VESSELS IN SIGHT OF ONE ANOTHER

ART. 28. When vessels are in sight of one another a steam vessel under way whose engines are going at full speed astern shall indicate that fact by three short blasts on the whistle.

NO VESSEL UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES TO NEGLECT PROPER PRECAUTIONS

ART. 29. Nothing in these rules shall exonerate any vessel, or the owner, or master or crew thereof, from the consequences of any neglect to carry lights or signals, or of any neglect to keep a proper lookout, or of the neglect of any precaution which may be required by the ordinary practice of seamen, or by the special circumstances of the case.

ART. 30. The exhibition of any light on board of a vessel of war of the United States or a revenue cutter may be suspended whenever, in the opinion of the Secretary of the Navy, the commander in chief of a squadron, or the commander of a vessel acting singly, the special character of the service may require it.

ART. 31. When a vessel is in distress and requires assistance from other vessels or from the shore the following shall be the signals to be used or displayed by her, either together or separately, namely:

In the daytime. A continuous sounding with any fog-signal apparatus, or firing gun.

At night.First. Flames on the vessel as from a burning tar barrel, oil barrel, and so forth.

Second. A continuous sounding with any fog-signal apparatus, or firing a gun.

RULES FOR LIGHTS FOR CERTAIN CLASSES. OF VESSELS NAVIGATING THE

HARBORS, RIVERS, AND INLAND WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES, EXCEPT THE GREAT LAKES AND THEIR CONNECTING AND TRIBUTARY WATERS AS FAR EAST AS MONTREAL, AND THE RED RIVER OF THE NORTH, AND RIVERS EMPTYING INTO THE GULF OF MEXICO, AND THEIR TRIBUTARIES

The following rules for lights to be carried by ferry boats, rules for lights for barges and canal boats in tow of steam vessels, rules for lights for rafts and other water craft navigating by hand power, horsepower, or by the current of the river, rule relating to use of searchlights, rule prohibiting unnecessary sounding of the steam whistle, rule prohibiting the carrying of unauthorized lights on steam vessels, and rules relating to drawbridges over navigable water of the United States were adopted by the Board of Supervising Inspectors, Steamboat Inspection Service, and approved by the Secretary of Commerce.

These rules concerning lights shall be complied with in all weathers from sunset to sunrise.

34370o--27 -22

RULES FOR LIGHTS TO BE CARRIED BY FERRY BOATS NAVIGATING THE HARBORS,

RIVERS, AND INLAND WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES, EXCEPT THE GREAT LAKES AND THEIR CONNECTING AND TRIBUTARY WATERS AS FAR EAST AS MONTREAL, AND THE RED RIVER OF THE NORTH, AND RIVERS EMPTYING INTO THE GULF OF MEXICO, AND THEIR TRIBUTARIES

4

Ferryboats propelled by machinery and navigating the harbors, rivers, and other inland waters of the United States, except the Great Lakes and their connecting and tributary waters as far east as Montreal, and the Red River of the North, and rivers emptying into the Gulf of Mexico, and their tributaries, shall carry the range lights and the colored side lights required by law to be carried on steam vessels navigating those waters, except that doubleend ferryboats shall carry a central range of clear, bright, white lights, showing all around the horizon, placed at equal altitudes forward and aft, also on the starboard side a green light, and on the port side a red light, of such a character as to be visible on a dark night with a clear atmosphere at a distance of at least 2 miles, and so constructed as to show a uniform and unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 10 points of the compass, and so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to 2 points abaft the beam on their respective sides.

The green and red lights shall be fitted with inboard screens projecting at least 3 feet forward from the lights, so as to prevent them from being seen across the bow.

Local inspectors in districts having ferryboats shall, whenever the safety of navigation may require, designate for each line of such boats a certain light, white or colored, which shall show all around the horizon, to designate and distinguish such lines from each other, which light shall be carried on a flagstaff amidships, 15 feet above the white range lights.

RULES FOR LIGHTS FOR BARGES AND CANAL BOATS IN TOW OF STEAM VESSELS AND

FOR LIGHTS AND DAY SIGNALS FOR DREDGES, VESSELS WORKING ON WRECKS, ETC., NAVIGATING THE HARBORS, RIVERS, AND OTHER INLAND WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES, EXCEPT THE GREAT LAKES AND THEIR CONNECTING AND TRIBUTARY WATERS AS FAR EAST AS MONTREAL, AND THE RED RIVER OF THE NORTH, AND RIVERS EMPTYING INTO THE GULF OF MEXICO, AND THEIR TRIBUTARIES

Lights for barges and canal boats in tow of steam vessels on certain inland waters on the seaboard, except the Hudson River and adjacent waters and Lake Champlain.-On the harbors, rivers, and other inland waters of the United States, except the Great Lakes and their connecting and tributary waters as far east as Montreal, and the Red River of the North, and rivers emptying into the Gulf of Mexico, and their tributaries, and except on the waters of the Hudson River and its tributaries from Troy to the boundary lines of New York Harbor off Sandy Hook, as defined pursuant to section 2 of the act of Congress of February 19, 1895, the East River, and Long Island Sound (and the waters entering thereon, and to the Atlantic Ocean), to and including Narragansett Bay, R. I., and tributaries, and Lake Champlain, barges (except scows) and canal boats in tow of steam vessels shall carry lights as follows:

Barges and canal boats towing astern of steam vessels, when towing singly, or what is known as tandem towing, shall each carry a green light on the starboard side and a red light on the port side, and a white light on the stern, except that the last vessel of such tow shall carry two white lights on her stern, athwartship, horizontal to each other, not less than 5 feet apart, and not less than 4 feet above the deck house, and so placed as to show all around the horizon.

When two or more boats are abreast, the colored lights shall be carried at the outer sides of the bows of the outside boats. Each of the outside boats in last tier of a hawser tow shall carry a white light on her stern.

The white light required to be carried on stern of a barge or canal boat carrying red and green side lights shall be carried in a lantern so constructed that it shall show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 12 points

4 See act of Congress approved June 9, 1910, effective on and after July 9, 1910. prescribing lights that shall be carried by certain classes of vessels of not more than 65 feet in length, amendatory to these rules, p. 335.

of the compass, namely, for 6 points from right aft on each side of the vessel, and shall be of such a character as to be visible on a dark night with a clear atmosphere at a distance of at least 2 miles.

Barges or canal boats towing alongside a steam vessel shall, if the deck, deck houses, or cargo of the barge or canal boat be so high above water as to obscure the side lights of the towing steamer when being towed on the starboard side of the steamer, carry a green light upon the starboard side; and when towed on the port side of the steamer, a red light on the port side of the barge or canal boat; and if there is more than one barge or canal boat abreast, the colored lights shall be displayed from the outer side of the outside barges or canal boats.

The colored side lights referred to in these rules for barges and canal boats in tow shall be fitted with inboard screens, so as to prevent them from being seen across the bow, and of such a character as to be visible on a dark night, with a clear atmosphere, at a distance of at least 2 miles, and so constructed as to show a uniform and unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 10 points of the compass, and so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to 2 points abaft the beam on either side. The minimum size of the glass globes shall not be less than 6 inches in diameter and 5 inches high in the clear.

Scows when being towed by steam vessels on the waters covered by the first paragraph of these rules shall carry a white light at each end of each scow, except that when such scows are massed in tiers, two or more abreast, each of the outside scows shall carry a white light on its outer bow, and the outside scows in the last tier shall each carry, in addition, a white light on the outer part of the stern. The white light shall be carried not less than 8 feet above the surface of the water, and shall be so placed as to show an unbroken light all around the horizon, and shall be of such a character as to be visible on a dark night with a clear atmosphere at a distance of at least 5 miles.

RULES FOR LIGHTS AND DAY SIGNALS TO BE CARRIED BY VESSELS, DREDGES OF ALL

TYPES, AND VESSELS WORKING ON WRECKS OR OTHER OBSTRUCTIONS TO NAVIGATION, OR MOORED FOR SUBMARINE OPERATIONS, OR MADE FAST TO A SUNKEN OBJECT WHICH MAY DRIFT WITH THE TIDE OR BE TOWED

5

Rule for signals to be displayed by a towing vessel when towing a submerged or partly submerged object upon a hauser when no signals are displayed upon the object which is towed.—The vessel having the submerged object in tow shall display by day, where they can best be seen, two shapes, one above the other, not less than 6 feet apart, the lower shape to be carried not less than 10 feet above the deck houses. The shapes shall be in the form of a double frustum of a cone, base to base, not less than 2 feet in diameter at the center nor less than 8 inches at the ends of the cones, and to be not less than 4 feet lengthwise from end to end, the upper shape to be painted in alternate horizontal stripes of black and white, 8 inches in width, and the lower shape to be painted a solid bright red.

By night the towing vessel shall display the regular side lights, but in lieu of the regular white towing lights shall display four lights in a vertical position not less than 3 feet nor more than 6 feet apart, the upper and lower of such lights to be white, and the two middle lights to be red, all of such lights to be of the same character as is now prescribed for the regular towing lights.

Rule for steamers, derrick boats, lighters, or other types of vessels made fast alongside a wreck, or moored over a wreck which is on the bottom or partly submerged or which may be drifting.–Steamers, derrick boats, lighters, or other types of vessels made fast alongside a wreck, or moored over a wreck which is on the bottom or partly submerged, or which may be drifting, shall display by day two shapes of the same character and dimensions and displayed in the same manner as required by the foregoing rule, except that both the shapes shall be painted a solid bright red; but where more than one vessel is: working under the above conditions, the shapes need be displayed only from one vessel on each side of the wreck from which it can best be seen from all directions.

6 Adopted by executive committee of Board of Supervising Inspectors on July 22, 1914, and approved by Secretary of Commerce on July 28, 1914. Adopted by Board of Supervising Inspectors on Jan, 20, 1915, and approved by the Secretary of Commerce on Apr. 12, 1915.

By night this situation shall be indicated by the display of a white light from the bow and stern of each outside vessel or lighter not less than 6 feet above the deck, and in addition thereto there shall be displayed in a position where they may best be seen from all directions two red lights carried in a vertical line not less than 3 feet nor more than 6 feet apart, and not less than 15 feet above the deck.

Rule for dredges which are held in stationary position by moorings or spuds.-Dredges which are held in stationary position by moorings or shall display by day two red balls not less than 2 feet in diameter and carried in a vertical line not less than 3 feet nor more than 6 feet apart, and at least 15 feet above the deck house and in such a position where they can best be seen from all directions. By night they shall display a white light at each corner, not less than 6 feet above the deck, and in addition thereto there shall be displayed in a position where they may best be seen from all directions, two red lights carried in a vertical line not less than 3 feet nor more than 6 feet apart, and not less than 15 feet above the deck. When scows are moored alongside a dredge in the foregoing situation they shall display a white light on each outboard corner, not less than 6 feet above the deck.

Rules for self-propelling suction dredges under way with their suctions on the bottom.—Self-propelling suction dredges under way with their suction on the bottom shall display by day the same signals as are used to designate any steamer not under control; that is to say, two black balls not less than 2 feet in diameter and carried not less than 15 feet above the deck house, and where they may best be seen from all directions.

By night they shall carry, in addition to the regular running lights, two red lights of the same character as the masthead light, in the same vertical plane and underneath the masthead light, the red lights to be not less than 3 feet nor more than 6 feet apart and the upper red light to be not less than 4 feet and not more than 6 feet below the white masthead light, and on or near the stern two red lights in the same vertical plane not less than 4 feet nor more than 6 feet apart, to show through 4 points of the compass; that is, from right astern.to 2 points on each quarter.

Rule for vessels which are moored or anchored and engaged in taying pipe or operating on submarine construction or excavation.Vessels which are moored or anchored, and engaged in laying pipe or operating on submarine construction or excavation shall display by day, not less than 15 feet above the deck, where they can best be seen from all directions, two balls not less than 2 feet in diameter, in a vertical line not less than 3 feet and not more than 6 feet apart, the upper ball to be painted in alternate black and white vertical stripes 6 inches wide, and the lower ball to be painted a solid bright red. By night they shall display three red lights, carried in a vertical line not less than 3 feet nor more than 6 feet apart and not less than 15 feet above the deck, and in such position as may best be seen from all directions.

All the lights required by these special rules for dredges, wrecking boats, lighters, etc., shall be of such size and character as to be visible on a dark night with a clear atmosphere for a distance of at least 2 miles.

Rule for vessels which are moored or at anchor.- Vessels of more than 300 gross tons propelled by machinery when moored or anchored in a fairway or channel where traffic is liable to congestion or confusion shall display between sunrise and sunset on the forward part of the vessel where it can best be observed from other vessels one black ball or shape not less than 2 feet in diameter.

RULES FOR LIGHTS FOR RAFTS AND OTHER WATER CRAFT NAVIGATING BY HAND

POWER, HORSEPOWER, OR BY THE CURRENT OF THE RIVER, ON THE HARBORS, RIVERS, AND OTHER INLAND WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES, EXCEPT THE GREAT LAKES AND THEIR CONNECTING AND TRIBUTARY WATERS AS FAR EAST AS MONTREAL AND THE RED RIVER OF THE NORTH AND RIVERS EMPTYING INTO THE GULF OF MEXICO AND THEIR TRIBUTARIES

Any vessel, except rafts and rowing boats under oars, navigating by hand power, horsepower, or by the current of the river, shall carry one white light forward, not less than 8 feet above the surface of the water.

Rafts propelled by hand power or by the current of the river, or which shall be anchored or moored in or near a channel or fairway, shall carry white lights, as folows: Rafts of one crib and not more than two in length shall carry one white light. Rafts of three or more cribs in length and one crib in

« AnteriorContinuar »