Miscellaneous Essays: By Archibald Alison, Volumen2

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Carey & Hart, 1845 - 390 páginas

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Página 6 - Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; If I have freedom in my love And in my soul am free, Angels alone, that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.
Página 158 - Still o'er these scenes my memory wakes, And fondly broods with miser care ; Time but the impression deeper makes, As streams their channels deeper wear.
Página 363 - Their starting-point is different, and their courses are not the same; yet each of them seems to be marked out by the will of Heaven to sway the destinies of half the globe.
Página 69 - Seven stood upright; the rest had been dislodged from their places, probably by the zeal of some convert to Christianity, and lay, some prostrate near their former site, and others on the side of the hill. One large stone only had found its way to the bottom, and, in stopping the course of a small brook which glided smoothly round the foot of the eminence, gave, by its opposition, a feeble voice of murmur to the placid and elsewhere silent streamlet.
Página 361 - ... one race, owing their origin to the same cause, and preserving the same civilization, the same language, the same religion, the same habits, the same manners, and imbued with the same opinions, propagated under the same forms. The rest is uncertain, but this is certain ; and it is a fact new to the world — a fact fraught with such portentous consequences as to baffle the efforts even of the imagination.
Página 69 - ... grass forces upon our imagination the recollection ; that it owes its dark luxuriance to the foul and festering remnants of mortality which ferment beneath. The daisy which sprinkles the sod, and the harebell which hangs over it, derive their pure nourishment from the dew of heaven ; and their growth impresses us with no degrading or disgusting recollections. Death has indeed been here, and its traces are before us ; but they are softened and deprived of their horror by our distance from the...
Página 69 - Roman soldiery, tiling their gnarled arms over a thick carpet of the most delicious green sward; in some places they were intermingled with beeches, hollies, and copsewood of various descriptions, so closely as totally to intercept the level beams of the sinking sun ; in others they receded from each other, forming those long sweeping vistas, in the intricacy of which the eye delights to lose itself, while imagination considers them as the paths to yet wilder scenes of silvan solitude.
Página 363 - All other nations seem to have nearly reached their natural limits, and they have only to maintain their power; but these are still in the act of growth. All the others...
Página 70 - Still, however, his dying splendor gave a sombre magnificence to the massive congregation of vapors, forming out of their unsubstantial gloom the show of pyramids and towers, some touched with gold, some with purple, some with a hue of deep and dark red. The distant sea, stretched beneath this varied and gorgeous canopy, lay almost portentously still, reflecting back the dazzling and level beams of the descending luminary, and the splendid coloring of the clouds amidst which he was setting.
Página 159 - The world was sad ; the garden was a wild ! And man, the hermit, sighed, till woman smiled...

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