Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

to an understanding with the Dominican republic, and there appears reason to believe that the overthrow of President Baez has removed one of the main obstacles to an adjustment of the differences prevailing between the two republics.

Her Majesty's government are willing, in the interests of humanity, to use their best efforts to bring about a better understanding between the two sections of the island. The French government are also prepared to lend their aid in the attempt at conciliation, and the co-operation of the government of the United States, it is believed, would contribute powerfully in effecting this desirable object.

Before proceeding further, however, I am directed to consult you on the subject, and to ascertain, as you have recently visited the island, and are in possession, doubtless, of information of a late date, whether in your opinion such a joint mediation of the three powers is deemed likely to lead to satisfactory results; and if so, whether the government of the United States would be inclined to take part in the mediation in concert with France and Great Britain.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, 80., 8c., sc.

Mr. Seward to Sir F. Bruce.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, July 11, 1866. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 10th instant, in which you inform me that the Haytien minister in London, in the month of June last, expressed by order of his government a strong desire of the President of Hayti to come to a friendly understanding with the Dominican republic.

You also inform me that her Majesty's government, as well as the French government, are prepared to lend their aid in the attempt at reconciliation between those republics, and you invite the co-operation of the government of the United States.

In reply, I have the honor to state that the President entirely concurs in the sentiments of her Majesty's government and of the French government upon this subject, which you have communicated to me, and that he would have been prepared to express that concurrence in some practical form which would have been consistent with the general habits and policy of the United States, if the condition of both of those republics had undergone no change since his attention was first called to the subject. A revolution, however, has now occurred in St. Domingo, and no permanent government or administration has yet been established there.

Under these circumstances the President thinks that it has become necessary to await a reorganization of the government in that part of the island. When that reorganization shall occur, the President will with pleasure recur to the subject, if a necessity for good offices on the part of friendly powers shall seem to exist.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. The Hon. Sir Frederick W. A. BRUCE, fr., 8c., 8c.

Mr. Seward to Sir F. Bruce.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, July 12, 1866. Sir: I have the honor to inform you that it has been authoritatively represented to me that an armed party from the Canadian gunboat Michigan have recently landed within the jurisdiction of the United States, on the river St. Clair, seized, bound, and forcibly conveyed to that vessel John Chapell, a deserter from the Royal Marines light infantry, Plymouth division.

I will thank you to make this fact known to the proper Canadian authorities, in the expectation that if, upon inquiry, it shall appear that such a violation of the sovereignty of the United States as is above described has actually occurred, the captured man may be replaced within the jurisdiction of the United States, and such amends made as may be due to the dignity of a friendly state, and from the nature of the offence.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, The Hon. Sir Frederick W. A. BRUCE, &c., 8c., 8c.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Scward.

WASHINGTON, July 13, 1866. The undersigned has been instructed by her Majesty's government to state that the principal maritime powers have for a long time interested themselves in endeavoring to establish a system of international marine signals that should be universal in its application.

In the year 1864 the governments of France and Great Britain resolved, for the general interests of shipping and commerce, to determine by investigation, which, if any, of the signal codes then existing possessed the elements of a system most favorable for general adoption for intercommunication by vessels of all nations irrespective of country or language, and which in fact most nearly fulfilled the conditions requisite to insure the advantages and claim the title of an “universal language of signals.”

An international commission was accordingly appointed by the governments of France and Great Britain for the purpose of examining and reporting upon the merits of the commercial code of signals for the use of all nations which had been selected as the code best adapted for general use.

This code has been revised by that commission, and after considerable modification and improvement, it has now assumed a cosmopolitan character which no other code of marine signals has to this time so completely presented.

The revised code has been simultaneously published in Paris and London ; its adoption for use on board of ships of war of France and Great Britain for intercommunication with each other, and with merchant vessels, has been ordered by the respective governments, and its use on board merchant vessels has been strongly recommended by the associations connected with shipping, and every means have been taken by the governments of France and Great Britain to promote and extend its adoption at home, and in their respective colonies and dependencies, both on board merchant ships and signal stations.

The undersigned has now the honor to enclose a copy of the English signalbook, and he begs leave at the same time to state that, with the view of insuring to all maritime States a participation in the benefits of a uniform system, and at the same time of preserving the essentially international character of the signal code, the governments of France and of Great Britain have mutually agreed between themselves to act upon, and to request other governments who may adopt the commercial code to adhere to the following regulations :

1. The government of each country adopting the code will undertake to exercise a control over its publication, so as to insure that the signals and their significations are exactly conformable to those of the French and English editions; and no edition will be authorized by any government unless recognized by the proper department of such government as being correct and in conformity with the French and English types.

2. Each government adopting the code will prepare and publish an official list of national ships of war and of merchant vessels, assigning to each vessel one of the signals expressly set apart in the code as the distinguishing signals for making ships' names. In doing this it would be desirable that the form of these lists, as adopted by France and Great Britain, should be adhered to.

In calling the attention of the government of the United States to this subject, which is one of great importance to the interests of the mercantile marines of all nations, the undersigned has only to add that he will be glad to be enabled to report to her Majesty's government the view which the United States government may take of this matter, and whether the United States government are disposed to co-operate by the adoption of the code.

The undersigned avails himself of this opportunity to renew to Mr. Seward the assurance of his highest consideration.

FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE. Hon. William H. SEWARD, Sc., fr., &c.

Sir F. Bruce lo Mr. Seward,

WASHINGTON, July 13, 1866. Sir: I have duly reported to her Majesty's government the disturbances that lately took place on the frontiers of New Brunswick and Canada, and the measures taken by the government of the United States to prevent these expeditions of armed men, in breach of the neutrality laws, from being carried into effect.

I am directed by her Majest.y's government, in reply, to state that for some months past they have observed with regret, though without alarm, the organization of the Fenians in the United States, but they have invariably abstained from making any official representation to the cabinet at Washington, because they felt that they had no right, as indeed they had no desire, to interfere with the administration of the law in the United States. They had, moreover, a perfect conviction that if ever the time came for the fulfilment by the Uuited States of the obligations which international law imposes upon friendly and allied governments, that government would take all the measures which those obligations and regard for its own honor might call upon it to perform.

Her Majesty's government rejoice to find that this confidence has been fully justified by the result, and that the government of the United States acted, when the moment for acting came, with a vigor, a promptness, and a sincerity which call forth the warmest acknowledgments.

I am, in consequence, instructed to express to the government of the United States the thanks of her Majesty and of her Majesty's government for the friendly and energetic assistance which they have afforded in defeating the attempts to disturb the peace of her Majesty's possessions in North America.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, SC., c., &c.

Mr. Seward to Sir F. Bruce.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, July 16, 1866. Sir: I have the honor to invite your attention to the enclosed copy of a communication of the 23d ultimo, from James Diamond, who, it appears, is detained in the old jail at Toronto, Canada, and is charged with complicity in the late Fenian invasion of her Majesty's provinces.

I am induced, by the statement of Mr. Diamond in regard to his arrest, to commend his case to the early and kind consideration of her Majesty's author. ities.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. The Hon. Sir Frederick W. A. BRUCE, 80, fc, 8c.

Mr. Diamond to President Johnson.

TORONTO OLD JAIL, CANADA WEST, June 23, 1866. Sir: On the morning of the 2d instant I went over from Buffalo to the Canadian side, hearing of the great excitement being there. There were a great many went over to see what was going on. When we were returning we would not be allowed by a Canadian guard. I went to the United States consul at Fort Erie, and got a pass from him to cross, but when I presented it to the corporal of the guard, he took it and went to a higber officer, and I did not see it from that forth. They arrested me afterwards as prisoner, (in the name of the Queen,) searched me thoroughly, but found nothing on me but four likenesses of young men and young women and a ten-dollar bill, United States money, all of which they kept. They told me they arrested me on suspicion of being a Fenian. All I could say would not avail. They sent me to this place, and here I am since, without any trial, and do not know when we will have any. My mother and one brother and three sisters are still in Nashville, Tennessee; the eldest of them is only a little over ten years old. I am a moulder by trade, and I used to send them all I could spare. I served in your own old regiment, the tenth Tennessee, for three years and one month ; Captain Joyca was my captain, company B ; Colonel Gilliam our colonel, and when I was discharged by an honorable discharge, Colonel Scully was our colonel. I afterwards got my citizenship papers.

Hoping to your honor that you will do something for me to get me out of this place, I remain your humble servant,

JAMES DIAMOND. His Excellency President Johnson.

Please write immediately. Direct for James Diamond, (prisoner,) care of the American consul, Toronto.

Mr. Seward to Sir F. Bruce.

DEPARTMENT of State,

Washington, July 16, 1866. Sir: I have the honor to invite your attention to the enclosed copy of a communication from Mr. Patrick O'Mally, who, it appears, is detained in the old jail at Toronto, Canada, on the charge of participation in the late Fenian invasion of her Majesty's provinces.

The apparent innocence of O'Mally of any intention to occupy any other position than that of a mere spectator of the proceedings of the Fenians induces me to commend, through you, his statement to the kind interpretation of her Majesty's provincial authorities.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, The Hon. Sir FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE, 8c., fr., fr.

Mr. O'Mally to President Johnson.

TORONTO OLD JAIL, CANADA WEST, June 23, 1866. SIR: I hope you will excuse me (being only a poor laboring man) for my presumption in writing to your honor, but being acquainted with you by seeing you often in Tenuessee, and hearing you speak in public eight years before the rebellion, (and after it was over,) and knowing that your high but kind principles were always such as to hear and look after the poor man, I thought it expedient to write to your honor from this jail (it is the first one of the kind I was ever in) and let your honor know all about how I happened to be here. I came on a steamboat to Pittsburg, and there was paid. I sent the most of my pay to my wife and four children to Louisville, Kentucky, and I told her I would see and make my way to Buffalo and work there for the summer, as I expected to get to be a steersman on the canal, at thirty-five or forty dollars per month and board. In Louisville, when I left, the wages was only $1 50 per day, and little work at that to be had, and house rent being so high, and the prices of provisions, a man with a family bad to scratch hard to live. I had a partner, a young man, along with me, who helped me with some money. I was in Buffalo for some time, and at last succeeded in getting work, and engaged to go to work Monday, the 4th of June, but, unfortunately, I crossed over to the Canadian side to see the excitement, in company with a few others, citizens of Buffalo, on Saturday morning, 2d of June. (The excitement was caused by Fenians being fighting about ten or twelve miles from there, that is, from Fort Erie.) I remained there for some time, and when thinking to recross I would not be allowed, and passes from the United States consul at Fort Erie were of no use.

In a short time after I was arrested prisoner, in the Queen's name, by Captain King, on the public road, on suspicion of being a Fenian. He searched me carefully, and found nothing on my person but a pocket knife and a sinall lead-pencil; but still he marched me along until he sent me aboard the steamboat Rob. After some time a man came aboard and wrote the names of all the prisoners on board and what was found on the person of each of them. Captain King told him he found nothing on me but what I have mentioned, but still they held me, and here I am, three weeks to-day, without a trial, and do not know when we will have any. There are several men here who fought bravely for their adopted country three and four years during the last rebellion. There is no proof against the most part of us, (but suspicion.) The American consul came to see us ; indeed, we expected to hear some words of comfort from him, but his words were these: “Stand back;" and after a few more words about Canada, he said if any of us could or would be convicted as belonging to the Fenian organization who troubled Canada, he would like to see the last one of us strung up: Some made the remark, “We want a trial,” but no answer. He came again this week and told us to send after our citizenship papers. Some told him they had lost them, and had no friends outside to trouble themselves about going to the place where they first got them, and have other papers sent them. So this is the way a good many of us stand. But we live in hopes of being once more released from British yoke, and standing free on the soil of our adopted country, under the wings of the eagle, and our loved stars and stripes; but, indeed, if not released soon, the English will have the pleasure of burying some of us. Our food is bread and water for breakfast, soup, made from some old cow's head, and a little bread for dinner, and a little corn meal mush for supper. This treatment will hurry us on fast, but the Lord, who knows all things, sees this. There are only a few married men here, but none as far from his wife and children as I am. I hope your Excellency will pause a few moments and think on me here in an English prison and away from them, not able to send them any relief, and knowing they have not much store to fall back on, and I thinking that the two of them that are able will soon be compelled to go around the town and provide for the others ; it almost kills me. (The number of my house is 13 Preston street, Louisville, Kentucky.)

Praying that the Lord may guide you in all wisdom and truth, and to look into my condi. tion, I remain your most humble and obedient servant and citizen,

PATRICK O'MALLY. His Excellency A. JOHNSON,

President of the United States. I hope you will act soon on this. Direct for me, in care of the Ainerican consul at Toronto, or else write to him-old jail.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, July 21, 1866. Sir: With reference to my note of the 5th instant, and to previous correspondence, I have the honor to inform you that the government of Prince Edward's Island have agreed to recognize in the waters within its jurisdiction the fishing licenses issued by the other British North American provinces.

« AnteriorContinuar »