Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

a confident expectation that no proceedings that shall not be authorized by and be in conformity with law, will be taken against persons of that class, and in the hope that even the customary administration of the law will be tempered with special forbearance and clemency.

In view of the effective proceedings which this government has adopted in regard to the disturbances on the frontier, now so fortunately ended, these representations would have been made by me without waiting to be moved from any other quarter. They are now made, however, with the approval of Major General Meade, and I believe that they will receive the concurrence of the Congress and the people of the United States.

I have the honor to be, sir, with the highest consideration, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. The Hon. Sir FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE, 80., 80., 80.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, June 11, 1866. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of this day's date, conveying to me the gratifying intelligence that the measures taken by the government of the United States, and the judicious arrangements of Major General Meade, have put an end to the prosecution on the frontier of designs against the tranquillity of the British provinces.

I have received no information as to any violation of the territory of the United States having been committed by the imperial or provincial troops of her Majesty, an occurrence which I should sincerely regret, and I may be permitted to doubt the accuracy of the reports forwarded to General Meade until that officer has been able to inquire into them, as the experience of the last week has proved that it is a part of the tactics of these agitators to circulate reports of this description in order to obtain for their cause a sympathy which is not extended to it.

I have not failed to transmit to the proper quarter in Canada the substance of your note respecting the treatment of the individuals who have fallen into the hands of the Canadian authorities. It is not to be denied, nor is it unnatural, that much indignation should be felt against them. But it is a satisfactory circumstance, and creditable to the humanity of those engaged, that the men who formed part of the expedition which crossed at Fort Erie and were taken in the act of attacking the Canadians who turned out to defend their homes, were not summarily disposed of, but were reserved to be dealt with after due investigation. I feel convinced that the observations contained in your note will receive the respectful consideration of the Canadian authorities, and that every disposition will be shown to confine the punishment of the offenders within the limits of what may be required to insure safety for the future, and of what will be confirmed by the decision of a sound and enlightened public opinion.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE. Hon. WILLIAM H. ŞEWARD, fc., $c., c.

Mr. Seward to Sir F. Bruce.

DEPARTMENT OF State,

Washington, June 14, 1866. SIR : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 2d instant, relative to the circumstances under which a shot was fired from her Majesty's ship Fawn, near Robbinstown, on the St. Croix river, which struck on the United States side of the river, and in reply to inform you, by direction of the President, that the explanation and the very courteous expressions of regret contained in your note are entirely satisfactory to this government.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. The Hon. Sir FREDERICK W. A. Bruce, fr., $c., fc.

Mr. Seward to Sir F. Bruce.

DePARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, June 21, 1866. Sir: I have the honor to invite your attention to the petition of Mrs. Sarah O’Malia, of Louisville, Kentucky, who states that her husband, Patrick O’Malia, a naturalized citizen of the United States, was carried away by the Fenians while on a spree and was subsequently captured near Fort Erie by the Canadian authorities. I presume he is now held in custody in Canada. Upon this assumption and the distress occasioned by the occurrence to his family, I am induced to commend the petition to your kind consideration, and its subject to the clemency of her Majesty's authorities.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. The Hon. Sir FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE, Sr., 8c., sc.

Mrs. O'Malia to Mr. Seward.

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY, June 18, 1866. COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY, County of Jefferson :

Your petitioner, Sarah O'Malia, would respectfully represent to you that her husband, Patrick O'Malia, is a citizen of the United States, born in Ireland ; that he served in the Union army during the late war of the rebellion.

She states that he receutly went from Louisville, Kentucky, with an expedition into Canada, and was captured by the Canadians near Fort Erie.

She states that her said husband had no arms in his hands (as she is informed) when in Canada or when captured, and that he did not belong to the Fonians, but was taken away by them while on a spree, having been made drunk by them for that purpose.

She states that she is very poor and entirely dependent, and that she wishes to know whether the United States will interfere in behalf of one of its citizens in this state of case. Humbly petitioning, she subscribes herself,

SARAH O'MALIA. His Excellency WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State of the United States.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, June 23, 1866. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 21st instant, enclosing a petition from Mrs. Sarah O'Malia, respecting her husband, now under arrest in Canada as one of the persons engaged in the late raids on the frontier of that province.

I have transmitted a copy of her statement to his excellency the governor general, and I have no doubt that it will be investigated at once, as there is every disposition to give their full weight to such palliating circumstances as may be proved to exist in the cases of those who took part in these unjustifiable proceedings.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE. Hon. William H. SewARD, 8c., fr., &c.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, June 24, 1866. SIR: I have the honor to state that I am informed by his excellency the governor general of Canada that the governments of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick have agreed that the possession of a license issued by Canada to fish shall entitle the holder, during the season of 1866, to fish in the waters of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia as well as in those of Canada; the holder of a license from the government of Nova Scotia or New Brunswick, if any such shall be issued, being entitled to fish also in the Canadian waters. I shall feel much obliged if you will communicate this information to the chairman of the Committee of Ways and Means.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE. Hon. William H. SEWARD, SC., &c., fc.

Mr. Seward to Sir F. Bruce.

Department of State,

Washington, June 25, 1866. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of yesterday, announcing the liberal decision of the governments of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick in regard to fishing licenses granted by Canada to fishermen of the United States, and a similar decision of the Canadian government in regard to licenses issued by the governments of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.

In compliance with your request I shall communicate this information to the Committee of Ways and Means, and I shall also take pleasure in making it known to the public.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. The Hon. Sir FREDERICK W. A. Bruce, gr., $c., &c.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, June 29, 1866. Sir: With reference to your note of the 15th ultimo respecting the proposed appointment of additional consular officers of the United States in Canada, I am instructed by her Majesty's principal secretary of state for foreign affairs to inform you that her Majesty's government concur in this increase in the United States consular establishment in Canada, and that instructions in this sense will be forwarded to his excellency the governor general.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE. Hon. William H. SEWARD, &c., fr., sc.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, June 30, 1866. Sir: With reference to my note of the 23d instant I have the honor to inform you that his excellency the governor general of Canada, in acknowledging the despatch which I addressed to him respecting the prisoner O'Malia, states that his case will be taken into consideration, together with the petition in his favor and your request in relation to it.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, SC., Sc., fr.

Mr. Seward to Sir F. Bruce.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, June 30, 1866. Sir: I have the honor to invite your attention to the enclosed copy of a letter of the 28th instant, from the Hon. Thomas A. Hendricks, in regard to the arrest and detention of the Rev. John McMahon, a citizen of Indiana, upon suspicion of connection with the late Fenian incursion.

I trust that in view of the apparent innocence of the Rev. Mr. McMahon, an immediate investigation of his case may be made, and that, unless adequate proofs of his guilt can be produced, he may be promptly released. In any event, it is hoped that all of the misguided men whose complicity with the movement referred to shall be established may be leniently dealt with. I have, &c.,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. The Hon. Sir FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE, fc., 8c., fc.

Mr. Hendricks to Mr. Seroard.

SENATE CHAMBER,

Washington City, June 28, 1866. Sir: The Rev. John McMahon, the parish priest of Anderson, in the State of Indiana, was recently called to visit Canada on business connected with the estate of a deceased brother, and whilst there was arrested and lodged in the jail at Toronto, upon the charge of being connected with the Fenian invasion of that country, and he is now in the jail. I am satisfied by the information which I have that he was not in Canada upon any connection with the Fenian movement, but only upon proper business. I have the honor, therefore, to request that you will use the intiuence of your departinent with the authorities of Canada for the release of the reverend gentleman. With great respect,

THOMAS A. HENDRICKS. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

me that

Mr. Seward to Sir F. Bruce.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, June 30, 1866. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge, with much satisfaction, the receipt of your note of yesterday's date, in which, referring to my note of the 15th ultimo, respecting the proposed appointment of additional consular officers of the United States in Canada, you

inform

you

have been instructed by her Majesty's principal secretary of state for foreign affairs to make known to this department that her Majesty's government concur with the government of the United States in the proposed increase of its consular officers in Canada, and that instructions will be forwarded to his excellency the governor general to that effect.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. The Hon. Sir FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE, &c., fr., gc.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, July 5, 1866. SIR: With reference to my note of the 31st May last, I have the honor to inform you that I have received a despatch from his excellency the governor general of Canada, stating that the government of Prince Edward's Island has decided on adopting the system agreed to by the other provinces; consequently a fishing license issued by either Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, or Prince Edward's Island will now entitle the possessor of it to fish in the waters of all those colonies.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

FREDERICK W, A. BRUCE. Hon. William H. SEWARD, 80., fr., fc.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, July 10, 1866. Sir: The case of the Rev. J. McMahon, which you brought to my notice, has, together with the letter of the Hon. Mr. Hendricks, been taken into consideration by the proper authorities in Canada.

I regret to say that the preliminary examination has resulted in the full committal for trial of Mr. McMahon and the persons arrested at the same time.

But his excellency the governor general informs me that there will be no unnecessary delay in giving them the opportunity of establishing their innocence of the charges brought against them.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE. Hon. William H. SEWARD, SC, 8c., fr.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, July 10, 1866. SIR : The Haytien minister in London in the month of June expressed, by order of his government, the strong desire of the President of Hayti to come

« AnteriorContinuar »