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concession is no longer open to misconstruction, and would be accepted by the United States as a spontaneous act of good will. At all events, there can be nothing derogatory to the honor of England in offering to submit her neutrality laws, together with those of the United States, to revision by a mixed commission. No country has more to lose by a lax interpretation of these laws, and justice compels us to acknowledge that, had the United States gov. ernment connived at their evasion, the Fenian expedition might have inflicted much greater mischief on Canada. This will not be forgotten by Parliament, if it should be hereafter called upon to sanction overtures which may lead to an amicable compromise of the Alabama claims.

Mr. Scward to Mr. Adams.

No. 1855.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 8, 1866. Sir: Your despatch of the 21st of September, No. 1270, has been received. I learn from it with much satisfaction that, in execution of recent instructions from this department, you have, in a proper and becoming manner, called the attention of the British government to the claims of the United States for depredations committed on their ocean commerce by British subjects during the late war.

It is to be regretted that the solicitor's reconsideration of those claims is to encounter some delay. While the President is not disposed to complain of this, he trusts, at the same time, that you will, on all proper occasions, seek to impress her Majesty's government with the conviction of the importance of an early disposition of the question. In all our foreign relations I know of none that transcends it in importance, either to this country, or, in my opinion, to the country specially concerned. Your contemplated visit to the continent for a brief period is approved. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM. H. SEWARD, CHARLES Francis Adams, Esq., fr., fc., fc.

Mr. Moran to Mr. Seward.

No 8.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, October 13, 1866. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of despatches from the department numbered from 1846 to 1850, both inclusive.

There have been several incidents worthy of note in public affairs during the ? week. A great reform demonstration took place at Leeds, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, on Monday last, at which Mr. Bright spoke with his usual force. It has called forth much newspaper comment.

The conservative press is severe upon him, according to practice; but certain journals with liberal tendencies which have heretofore been given to indulge in expressions of disapproval of his views, display a willingness to co-operate with him that indicates a conviction on their part of the ultimate success of himself and friends in earrying parliamentary reform.

Mr. Grant Duff's speech to his constituents, at Elgin, is attracting some potice. So far, it is the most elaborate of the extra-parliamentary utterances pronounced this autumn.

For some days past there has been a good deal of talk in club circles about the inefficiency of the foreign enlistment act, and the necessity for amending it. I transmit an article from the Standard of the 10th instant, on this subject, which is not without significance. That newspaper is identified with the tory

party, and, although I cannot say that it is the recognized organ of any member of the present ministry, its known political bias and influence would seem to warrant the belief that it has authority for the announcement that Lord Derby is determined to appoint a royal commission to inquire into the workings of the existing law. The spirit of the article exhibits a feeling of assumed respect for the United States no one who read the Standard during our great struggle would be disposed to suspect it of entertaining.

If such a commission has been determined upon, it is not unfair to conclude that its conception is to be traced to the recent renewal of the President's desire that the two governments should arrive at an early and satisfactory settlement of the claims arising out of the piracy of the Anglo-rebel cruisers. I have the honor to be, sir, your

obedient servant,

BENJAMIN MORAN. Hon. William H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

Mr. Nforan to Mr. Seward.

No. 17.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, October 27, 1866. SIR: Several influential members of the House of Commons have delivered extra-parliamentary speeches to their constituents this week. That of Mr. W. E. Forster, at Bradford, has attracted the most notice. The question of reform naturally received much of his attention. I transmit a report of what he said, as it appeared in the Morning Star of the 24th instant.

The speech of Mr. Charles Gilpin, in the same newspaper, to his constituente in Northampton, contains a table of facts respecting the inequalities of borough representation, which exposes very clearly the unfairness of the system which now prevails in England. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

BENJAMIN MORAN. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

Mr. Hunter to Mr. Adams.

No. 1868.]

DeparTMENT OF State,

Washington, October 30, 1866. Sir: I transmit for your information a corrected copy of a note of the 27th instant, * addressed by the Secretary of State to Sir Frederick Bruce, and of an instruction, of the same date, to the United States consul at Toronto, in regard to the trials which are taking place in Canada, of citizens of the United States, charged with participation in the recent Fepian demonstrations against that province. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

W. HUNTER,

Acting Secretary. Charles FRANCIS ADAMS, Esq., 8c., 8., 8.

* For this enclosure see correspondence with British legation.

Mr. Sercard to Mr. Thurston.

No. 99.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 27, 1666. Sir: For your information I enclose a copy of a note of this date which I bave addressed to Sir Frederick W. A. Bruce, the British minister bere, upon the subject of the conviction and sentence of Jame Lynch and John McMahon, by a colonial court of Canada, on the charge of complicity and participation in the late attack on Fort Erie.

In accordance with the purpose expressed in that communication, you are expected with. out delay to procure for the use of this department a copy of the record of the trial and conviction of Lynch and McMahon, and also of all further trials and convictions of a similar character which shall take place in Canada, with the least possible delay after their termination. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. D. THURSTON, Esq.,

United States Consul, Toronto, Canada.

Mr. Moran to Mr. Seward.

No. 25.].

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, November 10, 1866. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the reception of despatches from the department numbered from 1865 to 1869, both inclusive. Two of these, namely, 1868 and 1869, of the 30th ultimo, were received to.day, in consequence of the rapid run made by the Scotia, which arrived at Queenstown at an early hour yesterday morning.

The inauguration dinner, on the accession of the new lord mayor of London, took place at Guildhall last evening. Lord Derby spoke on behalf of her Majesty's ministers, and I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of his speech, as printed in the Times of to-day. In this he very clearly intimates that a proposition for the arrangement of the differences with respect to the Alabama claims would be favorably entertained.

I also transmit copies of Blackwood's Magazine for this month, and the Standard of the 5th instant. The old instincts of that journal crop out from the article I have marked; but the confession of wrong done the United States by this country during the war, and the charge that the escape of the pirate Alabama was owing to the neglect of Lord Palmerston's government to perform its duty, when reviewed in the light of Lord Derby's speech, would seem to justify the belief that there is a growing disposition, among all classes of conservatives, to reopen the question of the claims, in order to arrive at its early and honorable settlement. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

BENJAMIN MORAN. Hon. William H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

Mr. Moran to Mr. Seward.

No. 281

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, November 16, 1866. Sir: As illustrating an episode in the history of the loan negotiated here during the rebellion, to aid the insurgents to carry on the war against the Union, I transmit herewith articles which appeared, on the 15th instant, in the columns of the Daily News and the Morning Star. The victims of this enormous fraud,

it would scem, are about to ask her Majesty's government to press their claim on that of the United States as an offset to the righteous demands of American citizens for compensation for the damages sustained by them through the depredations of the Anglo-rebel cruisers.

I suspect this project is, after all, the work of some unscrupulous stockbrokers, backed up by a few equally unscrupulous American adventurers, who aim at making money out of the original subscribers, by leading them on with the hope of thus obtaining the payment of their worthless bonds. But it is not to be supposed, for a moment, that the scheme will receive the countenance of this government. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

BENJAMIN MORAN. Hon. William H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State.

[From the Daily News, 15th November, 1866.] A memorandum from the committee of confederate bondholders states that they are actively engaged in bringing their claims to the attention of government, with a view to a consideration of them, as against or in common with those of the American government in relation to the Alabama and other claims.

[From the Morning Star, 15th November, 1866.] . We have been requested to state “that the committee of confederate bondholders are actively engaged in bringing their claims to the attention of government, with a view to a consideration of them, as against, or in common with, those of the American government in relatiou to the Alabama and other claims.” This is certainly the most wonderful step ever yet adopted by those unfortunate gentlemen who believed in most of our contemporaries during the American war. The bondholders combined in London to subscribe money for the purpose of inflicting injury and damage on the United States, with the view of ultimate profit, should their little game turn out to be a success. Other parties fitted out privateers for the same purpose, and looking to the like reward, and now when our own government is believed not to be indisposed to do what is right in the matter of the Alabama, the bondholders wish to put forward a claim against the United States, because they have lost their money in doing them injury and giving aid and comfort to their enemies. If the United States were to put in an item of several millions in their bill, as representing the injury done them by the contederate bondholders, we could understand it, but for the latter to claim satisfaction against the United States is something altogether unique in the matter of claims. The bondholders should present their old bonds to the writers in the public press, who misled them, as a recognition of their folly, and cease to trouble themselves further about steps which only end in chagrin and disappointment.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams.

No. 1875.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, November 16, 1866. Sir: I transmit for your information a printed copy of an instruction* of the 25th ultimo, addressed to Lewis D. Campbell, esq., our newly accredited minister to the republic of Mexico. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. Charles FranCIS ADAMS, Esq., $c., sc., fr.

* For enclosure see correspondence with Mexico.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams.

No. 1876.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, November 17, 1866. Sir: I transmit herewith for your information the copy of a note which, on the 15th instant, * Sir Frederick Bruce addressed to this department regarding the action of the Canadian authorities in the case of the Fenian prisoners who were concerned in the recent raid against Canada. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, Esq., 8c., $c., 8c.

Mr. Moran to Mr. Seward.

No. 29.)

LEGATION OF The United States,

London, November 17, 1866. Sir: Owing to the rapid passage made by the China, I am enabled to acknowledge the reception to-day of despatches from the department, numbered 1870 and 1871, addressed to me by Mr. Hunter, Acting Secretary of State, and dated the 3d instant. Considerable discussion is going on in the newspapers here on the proposal to reopen the Alabama claims and the announcement that the government contemplates the appointment of a royal commission to inquire generally into the operation of the British neutrality laws. I transmit copies of the Times of to-day and the Standard of yesterday, with leading articles upon these questions. They show the tone of public opinion on these important subjects. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

BENJAMIN MORAN. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams.

[Telegram per cable.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, November 29, 1866. CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, l'nited States Minister at London:

Disavow and reject, in the name of the United States, the whole arrangement made by Consul Morse and Montgomery Gibbs with Fraser, Trenholm & Co.

Give notice of this to consuls at London and Liverpool and to solicitors, and reply by telegraph. Also communicate the following to Mr. Consul Morse.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. Mr. F. H. Morse, United States Consul, London: You will come home without delay to make explanations.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

* For enclosure see correspondence with British legation.

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