Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

allegiance, which rests upor. every citizen, and it is no impeach. ment of his loyalty that he should be required to do so.

Jas. O. BROADHEAD.

Pro. Mar. Gen."

“HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Office Provost Marshal General,

St. Louis, June 17, 1863.

“ PAROLE. "1, W. H. Carlin, of Adams County, Illinois, do hereby promise, apon my word of honor, that I will remain within the limits of the city of St. Louis, Missouri, until further orders from the Provost Marshal General, pending the examination of my case, and that I will report in person to said Provost Marshal General tri-weekly, until further orders.

W. H. CARLIN." “On the above parole, said Carlin has been this day released as above.

Jas. O. BROADHEAD,

Lieut.-Col. and Provost Marshal General. “JAMES F. DWIGHT, Capt., and Assist. Insp. General,

Department of the Missouri.”

[ocr errors]

“ HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Office Provost Marshal General,

St. Louis, July 7, 1863. "The within parole of W. H. Carlin, of Adams County, Illi nois, is hereby modified, and extended so as to permit him to go to the State of Illinois, and the State of Missouri, and to ro. side in either State, and report weekly by letter to this office.

Jas. O. BROADHEAD,
Lieut.-Col. and Pro. Marshal General,

Department of the Mo."

“HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Office Provost Marshal General,

St. Louis, June 20, 1863.

“ PAROLE. “I, W. H. Carlin, of Adams County, Illinois, in consideration of being permitted to go to Quincy, Illinois, for one week from this date, do hereby promise, upon my word of honor, that I will return to the city of St. Louis, Missouri, and will report in person to the Provost Marsbal General, Department of the Missouri, at the expiration of that time, and will hold no 'communication with any disloyal persons.

W. H. CARLIN. “Witness: Edward Spabr, Clerk, office of the Provost Marshal General, Department of the Missouri. “Reported back, June 27, 1863.

EDWARD SPAhr, Clerk.”

“HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Office of the Provost Marshal General,

St. Louis, June 20, 1863.

“SPECIAL ORDER, No. 22. “ IV. The parole of W. H. Carlin, of Adams County, Illinois, is hereby extended so as to permit him to go to Quincy, Illinois, for one week, at the expiration of which time he will report back to this office. “By command of Major-General Schofield.

Jas. O. BROADHEAD, Provost Marshal General.”

“HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE Missouri,

Office Provost Marshal General,
St. Louis, July 7, 1863.

. “SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 32. “VII. The parole of W. H. Carlin, of Adams County, Illinois, 18 hereby modified and extended so as to permit said Carlin to reside in the State of Illinois, or in the State of Missouri, and to report weekly by letter to this office. 1. By command of Major-General Schofield.

Jas. O. BROADHEAD,
Lieut.-Col. and Provost Marshal General."

“HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Office Provost Marshal General,

St. Louis, Angust 18, 1863. " The parole of W. H. Carlip is hereby extended so as to include the State of Iowa.

JAS. O. BROADHEAD,
Lieut.-Col. and Provost Marshal General,

Department of the Missouri.”

No charges were ever preferred against Mr. Carlin, aud through the brutal treatment to which he was exposed, he died, and died without a release from his parole. The Government of Russia, Austria, or China has never exceeded the crimes which led to the death of Senator Carlin.

His mind was utterly impaired by his imprisonment; until the day of his death he never recovered. At Chicago, in 1864, during the Convention, he became excited, and all the outrages which had been inflicted upon him recurred to his mind in their most offensive form. He became more and more inflamed until his death. He was attacked on Friday inorning with general congestion, and died Saturday evening, about four o'clock. His suffering in prison was more intensified and aggravated by the following facts :

1st. He was the personal friend of Lincoln, though his political enemy.

2d. There were no charges against him.

3d. His Republican creditors bankrupted him while in prison, and left his helpless family in destitution.

HON. CHARLES INGERSOLL, AND EDWARD

INGERSOLL, ESQ.

ON
N the 13th of April, 1865, on the occasion of the celebra.

tion of Jefferson's birthday, in the city of New York, Mr. Edward Ingersoll, in answer to a toast deprecating the enormous Federal indebtedness, with which the war had overwhelmed the country, advocated the doctrine of Stato Rights as the only real basis of our Federal Union, or upon which, in the nature of things, our Union could permanently rest. Mr. Ingersoll also argued that if this overwhelming debt was revolutionary, either in its purpose or in its effect, if it had been created either in express disregard of the provisions of our written Constitution of Government, or still more, if it had been created with the design of overthrowing our liberties and system of laws, the people, who were interested in protecting their wise system of free government, were certainly not bound to recognize as honest the obligations of such a debt; that no sense of national honor, however refined or impracticably delicate, could call upon a people who loved their institutions, and were willing to defend them, to pay a debt created in the teeth of the express provisions of their Constitution of Government; and the certain political result of the permanent establishment of which debt must be to render that Constitution of Government irrecoverably and forever impossible. Whether there was truth and logic in this proposition that struck hard at the money powers of the country, who for some years past had been allowing themselves to be made the tools of political Abolitionism, we cannot say, but certain it is that Mr. Edward Ingersoll, a Philadelphia lawyer and a respectable citizen, who had heretoforr. been but little before the public, was

thought worthy of the fiercest newspaper denunciation and assault. President Lincoln's assassination on the night of Good Friday, April 14th, had aroused the people, as well as the madmen who hod been for some years misgoverning the country, to a sense of solemnity, at least. Several of the partisan presses of Phi adelphia were untiring in their efforts to excite against Mr. Ingersoll some mode of personal attack. A well-known member of the Union League assured a friend, that, to his knowledge, nothing had prevented Mr. Ingersoll's house being burned, but the fact that he occupied a rented one, and which belonged to a loyal man. Mr. Ingersoll was threatened, by an official communication from the United States District Attorney of Philadelphia, with prosecutiou for treason, for some of the sentiments of the New York speech. He was notified by the president of the bank where he had for many years deposited his money, to withdraw his account, as a person unworthy of even such exalted pecuniary relationship. So indignant was the exhibition of feeling on the part of the money powers against what Mr. Ingersoll thought to be the fair defence of a free citizen in behalf of the institutions of his country, that these facts, together with the receipt of anonymous threatening letters, induced him (most fortunately as it proved) to provide himself with a pocket pistol, to nieet the event of unavoidable necessity, should it occur.

On the morning of April 27th, on entering the cars as usual, in coming to his place of business, from his residence in the neighborhood of the city, Mr. Ingersoll was assailed by the cry of “ Traitor” from an adjoining car, and found himself the object of considerable obeervation. Nothing further was said or done, however, till, on stepping from the cars when the train had arrived at the depot, a man was observed calling to some persons to follow, and saying, pointing to Mr. Ingersoll, " There he goes.” Mr. Ingersoll walked to the corner close by, to wait for the street car.

While there, the assailant, with his backers, canie up, and after some insolent demand, which was proniptly and fitly replied to, an

a

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »