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18 years old on June 11 and received his degree one week later. Loeb will return to the university for research work in history.

CAPT. JAMES A. KEATING RECEIVES WAR MEDAL

FOR BRAVERY DURING WORLD WAR.

A war medal was bestowed at the school graduation presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Capt. James A. Keating for bravery and skill as an aviator during the World War. This ceremony closed the alumni reunion and military review of cadets and companies of national guard units and the 131st Infantry at Morgan Park Academy commencement exercises June 3, 1923. The review was made before Maj. Gen. George Bell, Jr., retired. Immediately after the review Maj. Gen. Bell, presented Captain Keating with the medal and read the citation telling of his patriotic service.

MRS. EDNA A. STREETER, WIDOW OF CAPT. GEORGE

STREETER OF THE DISTRICT OF LAKE
MICHIGAN PETITIONS COURT

FOR AN INJUNCTION. "Ma" Streeter. Mrs. Edna A. Streeter, widow of Capt. George W. Streeter erstwhile major of the District of Lake Michigan, on June 7, 1923, petitioned the Circuit Court to issue an injunction compeling the city to repair her house boat and then keep their hands off the good ship “Vamoose."

ENGINEERS FIONOR CAPT. R. W. HUNT FOR LONG

SERVICE IN STEEL WORK.

Capt. Robert Woolson Hunt, 86 year old veteran of the Civil War, was honored June 18, 1923, at the annual meeting of the Western Society of Engineers. He was presented with the Washington award “for his pioneer work in development of the steel industry, and for a life devoted to the advancement of the engineering profession.” This was an inscribed tablet -an unusual recognition of the American whose work has been of the greatest benefit to the country, founded in 1916 by John W. Alvord. Herbert Hoover, Secretary of Commerce, was given

the award last year. Captain Hunt who began work in rolling mills in 1856, was the first to establish a chemical laboratory in a steel mill.

BLACK HAWK PARK DEDICATED TO MEMORY

OF HEROES SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 1923. Black Hawk Park at Fullerton and LeClaire Avenues, Chicago, was dedicated on Sunday, June 10, 1923, to the memory of the 100,000 men who passed under the colors of the 86th Division during the World War. The ceremonies were in charge of Black Hawk Post of the American Legion. Addresses were made by Col. A. A. Sprague, commissioner of public works, Col. M. M. Keck, U. S. A., chief of staff of the 86th Division, Capt. Myron Adams, manager of the Fort Sheridan Association, and Assistant Corporation Counsel, Frank Padden.

CHICAGO BANK WOMEN FORM AN ORGANIZATION.

Miss Edna Howard is the president of the newly organ. ized Association of Chicago Bank Women, which was formed at a meeting and dinner held at the College Club on Friday night, July 6, 1923. Miss Howard is manager of the women's department of the Northern Trust Company. The other officers of this organization, the purpose of which is to bring together women who hold executive positions in banks to outline definite plans on how best to handle this new field opened to women, are Vice President, Miss Nina Y. Carter, manager of the women's department of the Peoples Trust and Savings Bank; Secretary, Miss Frances McKillip, manager of the women's department of the Garfield Park State Savings bank; Treasurer, Miss Mary Travers, manager women's department Lake Shore Trust and Savings Bank.

OLD TIME “MOURNERS BENCH” DISAPPEARS

AT CAMP MEETING.

The “Mourners bench” at the DesPlaines Camp meeting has been removed, wood and all. For sixty-four years the “Mourners bench," as the long wooden plank placed in front

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of the preacher's platform has been called, has been the center of interest as the spot where sinners have knelt in penitence. Whether it was considered a useless appendage to the modern style of camp meeting is a matter of conjecture. George Haberer, an old-timer called attention to its absence. "Nobody seems to miss it,” Mr. Haberer said. A touch of the old time camp meeting was given July 12, 1923, by the Rev. F. F. Familoe, who has been a member of the Rock River Conference as a minister for fifty-seven years and who has celebrated his seventy-seventh birthday. He led the morning class meeting and spoke on the value of joy in religion. At the evening service a large bouquet of flowers was presented to him which concealed a number of bank notes.

DR. ERNEST DE WITT BURTON MADE PRESIDENT

OF UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO.

Dr. Ernest De Witt Burton, who has been acting president of the University of Chicago, since the retirement of Harry Pratt Judson last February, was formally elected president of that institution Thursday, July 12, 1923, at a meeting of the board of trustees. In choosing Doctor Burton the University still follows the precedent by naming a Baptist as the guiding genius despite the recent action of the Northern Baptists' Convention in letting down the denominational bars so far as the presidency is concerned.

Doctor Burton who is 67 years old and has been connected with the University for more than thirty years, himself expressed the opinion sometime ago that the trustees might seek a younger man for the office. Shortly afterward the Baptists broadened the field of choice for both president and trustees by deciding the president need not be a Baptist and that only three-fifths of the trustees need be of that denomination instead of two-thirds as heretofore. Several nationally known educators have been mentioned for the post. It is believed the action of the trustees was largely influenced by the intimacy and sympathy of Doctor Burton with the policies laid down by Presidents Harper and Judson. These include the extension of the research work without detracting from the development of

a group of eight or ten colleges or destroying athletics and the social life. "President Burton is a scholar of international reputation in his field, an educator of wide observation and an experienced and accomplished administrator" said Harold H. Swift president of the board of trustees. "His connection with the university from the beginning and his studies abroad admirably fit him for the important position to which he has been elected.”

President Burton is head of the department of New Testament and early Christian literature, and for the last thirteen years has been director of libraries at the University. He visited China in 1908-09 as chairman of the oriental educational Commission of the University and was again Chairman of a commission to study educational conditions in China in 1920-21. From 1912 until recently he was chairman of the board of education of the Northern Baptist Convention. Frank H. Lindsay of Milwaukee was elected to the Baptist vacancy on the board.

CAHOKIA MOUNDS. ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE PASSES BILL APPROPRIATING MONEY FOR PURCHASE

OF THE MOUNDS.

Despite bitter opposition from many persons who believe that the Cahokia Mounds in Madison County are natural hills and not Indian remains, the Illinois legislature passed the bill appropriating $50,000 toward their purchase. The governor signed the bill. The tract containing the mounds will when the purchase has been made, pass to the control of the state. Of course this tract will include only a few of the mounds in the vicinity.

Some antiquarians contend that these mounds, sixty-four in number, are tombs of the kings of sun worshipers of many centuries ago. Menaced for years by the expansion of industries in their vicinity, fear has been expressed that the mounds would be lost to the public, if the state did not take action and convert the land into a public park. Thus researches by scientists will be possible. The Cahokia Mound is the largest and has a height of 102 feet and its largest axis is 998 feet, covering slightly more than sixteen acres.

In volume, the Cahokia is the greatest earth structure of the kind in the world. The builders of Cahokia are gone. The fire which burned upon the summit, through the watches of the night, is dead and the winds have scattered the ashes, but the temple remains. That pile, beautiful to see, rich in historical association, and the hope of archaeologists, remains in all its mystery. There may be a wonderful day in Illinois when these mounds like the tomb of King Tut are opened.

BRONZE MEMORIAL TABLET, ERECTED IN CHICAGO TO THE MEMORY OF JANE BERNARD SKINNER,

PIONEER IN CHILD WELFARE WORK. A bronze memorial tablet, erected to the memory of Jane Barnard Skinner in the name of the late Edward S. Shepherd the gift of his son, F. R. Shepherd, was unveiled July 26, 1923, at the entrance of the Chicago Avenue police station. Chief of Police Collins, in accepting the tablet on behalf of the people department, termed Mrs. Skinner one of America's greatest women; "unselfish, anxious to help humanity wherever her help was needed and always working so quietly that those next her scarcely knew what great work she was doing.” Mrs. Skinner who died January 12, 1923, was active in welfare work for many years.

The inscription on the tablet reads: "Tribute to the memory of Jane Barnard Skinner, 1858-1923, a pioneer in the cause of child welfare. For twenty-two years a volunteer officer of the Juvenile Court, it staunch supporter of constituted authority, yet ever ready to help and guide the law's trangressors to better things. The major portion of her life was de voted to the cause of humanity and her ever recurring deeds of love that shunned the sight of all but heaven have scattered rays of sunshine into the lives of a multitude of erring sisters, and of the destitute, homeless, and neglected."

ILLINOIS FIRMS GET LARGE SUMS IN FEDERAL

LOANS.

Illinois farmers have borrowed $56,959,400 from the banks of the federal farm loan system, according to a tabulation of

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