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" And though the Greek learning grew in credit amongst the Romans, towards the end of their commonwealth, yet it was the Roman tongue that was made the study of their youth: their own language they were to make use of, and therefore it was their own language... "
The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal - Página 68
1826
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Some thoughts concerning education [by J. Locke.]. By J. Locke

John Locke - 1712
...tho" the Greek Learning grew in Credit amongft: the Romans, towards the end of their Com* mon-wealth, yet it was the Roman Tongue that was made the Study...their Youth: Their own Language they were to make life of, and therefore it was their own Language they were inftructed and exercifed, in. But more particularly...
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Some Thoughts Concerning Education: By John Locke, Esq

John Locke - 1779 - 319 páginas
...had a contempt for their languages. And though the Greek learning grew in credit amongft the Romans, towards the end of their commonwealth, yet it was the Roman tongue that was made the ftudy of their youth : their own language they were to make ufe of, and therefore it was their own...
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The works of John Locke. To which is added the life of the author ..., Volumen9

John Locke - 1812
...had a contempt for their languages. And, though the Greek learning grew in credit amongst the Romans, towards the end of their commonwealth, yet it was...to determine the proper season for grammar ; I do not see how it can reasonably be made any one's study, but as an introduction to rhetoric : when it...
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Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin ..

Benjamin Franklin - 1818
...and had a contempt for their languages. And though the Greek learning grew in credit among the Romans towards the end of their commonwealth, yet it was...own language they were instructed and exercised in. And p. 281, " There can scarce be a greater defect (says he) in a gentleman, than not to express himself...
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Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin...: Posthumous and ...

Benjamin Franklin - 1819
...and had a contempt for their languages. And though the Greek learning grew in credit among the Romans towards the end of their commonwealth, yet it was...and therefore it was their own language they were inttntcted tmd exercised in." And p. 281, " There can scarce be a greater defect (says he) in a gentleman,...
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The Works of John Locke, Volumen9

John Locke - 1823
...had a contempt for their languages. And, though the Greek learning grew in credit amongst the Romans, towards the end of their commonwealth, yet it was...to determine the proper season for grammar ; I do not see how it can reasonably be made any one's study, but as an introduction to rhetoric : when it...
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The Western Monthly Review, Volumen3

Timothy Flint - 1830
...tempt for their languages. And though the Greek learning grew in credit 'amongst the Romans towards tho end of their commonwealth, yet it was the : Roman tongue that was the study of their youth ; their own language they were 1 to make use of, and therefore it was their...
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Essays on School Keeping: Comprising Observations on the Qualifications of ...

Allison Wrifford - 1831 - 200 páginas
...had a contempt for their languages. And, though the Greek learning grew in credit amongst the Romans, towards the end of their commonwealth, yet it was...particularly to determine the proper season for grammar} I do not see how i it can reasonably be made any one's study, but as an introduction to rhetoric: when it...
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The Works of Benjamin Franklin: Containing Several Political and ..., Volumen2

Benjamin Franklin, Jared Sparks - 1836
...and had a contempt for their languages. And though the Greek learning grew in credit among the Romans towards the end of their commonwealth, yet it was...own language they were instructed and exercised in." And, (p. 281,) " There can scarce be a greater defect," says he, " in a gentleman, than not to express...
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American Annals of Education, Volumen9

1839
...belong ; I mean children, at the age wherein they are usually perplexed with it in grammar-schools. But more particularly to determine the proper season for grammar; I do not see how it can reasonably be made any one's study, but as an introduction to rhetoric : when it...
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