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CATES LITERARY GAZETTE.

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, by Cummings, Hilliard, & Co. No. 1 Cornhill, Boston. ---Terms, $5 per annum, payable in July. BOSTON, JULY 1, 1824.

No. 6. o irars, and the evil passions that produce family had not quite run out in his time, wiem. This minister of the gospel, thinks relinquished his intention, expressing withal ut with us; he thinks that the Quakers his belief that “sum o’ bis bairns, or, aiblins,

ive of late been suffered to get along too sum o' his bairns' bairns, wull migrate to quietly; he says, their principles are an- that laun o’ free toleration,” and “com

ti-christian, and evidently believes, the pleet the wark, out o' the rich materials to >> | time has come, when some such able man be had in the toon of that singulair and

as himself should set about exposing them graite maun, Maister William Penn.” We

to universal reprobation. It is not strange regret, as the work did not see the light **** ! that Mr B. should be a bigot, thinking that within the time that the old man seems to

nothing can be believed or understood as have contemplated, that it should ever have it should be, by them who do not make his been produced. After the “proem" fol

creed their rule of belief,--for the world lows another address to the reader, setting ***T holds many such unfortunate people; but it forth, what, we believe in spite of Mr

ve is strange, that he should think of attack- Brownlee's example, is the truth, that "res by ing with his most especial wrath, the reli-ligious inquiry, and even controversy, is ex-gious principles of a society, which the best perfectly consistent with the loveliest ex

men of all denominations of Christians were, ercise of charity," and that “politeness alg as we thought, willing to acknowledge as and courtesy should preside over religious we an established Christian sect. The man-debates." How far this 4 minister of the

le? ner of this attack is not less strange; in- gospel” has exercised charity, and how reen deed, we are very happy to acknowledge, much he is governed by the rules of polite• nok, that there is, throughout, a very laudable ness and courtesy, our readers will present

for conformity between the design of the work ly see, in the extracts which we purpose to ht, to and its execution. His book begins by a make. Then follow what are called max** they formal dedication to his uncle, a professor ims; at the end of which he says, that the ristian of anatomy in the University of Glasgow. Quakers in this controversy are the assailence of Next follows an adverstisement to the read- ants, and he the defendant; because,

and still er, setting forth the author's diffidence saith he, the publication of the opinions of body, had (which is the first and last time that his a society has in it the nature of an open 1 the pro- diffidence appears in the book), and hinting challenge! Of course, Mr Brownlee connd charity, that he has taken great pains in collecting siders himself as having undergone the ice against materials, and that if his work take with challenge of every body who has written a ilest blots in the public, he may be induced to mention book; we hope our valiant champion will,

19, a society how much pains it cost him. Next is a in mercy to the “ reading public,"-who as Peon, and long and minute table of contents. Then must be in some sort seconds and bottle-hold

Reynolds, and comes what the author sees fit to call the ers,-play recreant occasionally, and not embers the he- proem, which occupies thirty-seven pages do battle on all these provocations. After been permitted with the story of the rebellion of the Pres- two mottos, we reach the first part of the

in peace. We byterians in Scotland, during the time of main work, which is styled “ An Historical at the principles Charles II. ;-which is rendered peculiarly Dissertation on the Origin, Rise, &c. of the ch as theirs, are pleasant by a reference to the part that Society of Friends.” In this part he enomination of Chris- the author's great-great-grandfather bore deavours to show, that certain opinions ied, with all defer- therein. We are to understand that this held by Plato, with some modifications, to think there is tol "great progenitor” was a star of pretty were also held by divers of the ancient believing, that “ the considerable magnitude among the Presby- Christian writers in the first and second » fruit." We thought, terians of old, as Mr B. succeeds in finding centuries of the Christian era, were receivdy of themselves in the him named in one book published about the ed by great numbers of the Greek Church, as a sort of motto to the time, where, it seems, that mention of him and, after the fall of the eastern empire, book on our table, that occurs in a sort of muster-roll of some pas- were also adopted by multitudes of the Laconsidered as a good sort sengers in a certain ship that was wrecked tin Church, and continued in substance to main; who refused to fight, in the Orkneys. There is, in this same prevail till the time of Luther, and afterind to pay tythes; and while proem, an account of the battle of Drum-wards spread widely among the Protestant anners of the age allow that clog, and of Bothwell-bridge; which, as churches, and now form a part of the docther singularities, they ought as well as the rest of this part of the, trines of the Quakers. Allowing this to be sted, the public, in general, work, is written in a style that strongly re- a correct genealogy, allowing that these rther about them;" and we minds us of Macpherson's Ossian, and opinions are correctly traced up to Plato, er, that the Society wis pro- Weems' Life of Washington. All we gath- who was not a Christian, still, it does not Christian example, a slutary er from the proem that has any relation to follow from this that *** actrines are e nations in which it e isted, the subject, may be comprised in one short false, and nobody, Q

supposes nd imperceptibly changing for sentence, to wit, that the author's aforesaid that this proves the

4 man be views of mankind upo one ancestor designed to write a polemical work may believe many

teach nt subjects; as, for ioshnce, l against the Quakers, but as the wit of the some truths, alunoog

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are

CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & CO.

SCHOOL BOOKS.

NOTES ON MEXICO.
Have just published, and for sale, CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & CO. No. 1 JUST received, and for sale by Cum-

Cornhill, have constantly on hand the most MINGS, HILLIARD, & Co. Notes on MerSERMONS, by the late Rev: David

Os- valuable and popular School and Classical Books, ico, made in the Autumn of 1822. Accompanied good, D. D. Pastor of the Church in Medford. and furnish Schools and Academies at whole- by an Historical Sketch of the Revolution, and Hobomok; a Tale of early times. By sale prices.

Translations of the Official Reports on the present An American. 1 vol. 12mo. price 75 cents.

Among those which they have lately published state of that Country. With a Map. By à Citi.

zen of the United States. 1 vol. 8vo. Then all this youthful paradise around, Colburn's Arithmetic Both excellent ele

ADVERTISEMENT. And all the broad and boundless mainland, lay

Do.

Sequel Cooled by the interninable wood, that frowned

mentary works.

" The Notes, which form the subject of these O'er mount and vale.

Bryant. Elements of Astronomy, illustrated with pages, were written during the author's rapid jourA Discourse on the proper Test of the Plates, for the use of Schools and Academies, with ney through Mexico, in the autumn of 1822, and Christian Character , delivered at the Church in Questions. By John H. Wilkins, A. M. Second were addressed in letters to a friend, without any

intention of their ever being made public. But Brattle-Square, Boston, on Lord's Day, March 21,

The New Testament, with References, the United States, in every thing relating to that

the deep and peculiar interest felt by the people of 1824. By Henry Colman. Second edition. A Practical Treatise upon the Authority and practical, designed to facilitate the acquisition the causes and character of the revolution which

and a Key Sheet of Questions, historical, doctrinal, country, and the imperfece accounts that exist of and Duty of Justices of the Peace in Criminal of Scriptural knowledge in Bible-Classes,

Sunday it has lately

undergone, have induced him to conProsecutions. By Daniel Davis, Solicitor General Schools, Common Schools, and private Families. sent to their publication." of Massachusetts. By Hervey Wilbur, A. M. Second edition, stereo

A Diary is not perhaps the best form for a work A General Abridgment and Digest of type.

of this description; nor is it that which the author

The Bible Class-Book; or Biblical Cate- himself would have preferred: but to have altered American Law, with occasional Notes and Comments. By Nathan Dane, LL. D. Counsellor at chism, containing Questions historical, doctrinal, the letters, so as to present a more connected narLaw. Volumes I. II. III.

practical, and experimental, designed to promote rative, would leave required more time than he Hints on Extemporaneous Preaching. an intimate acquaintance with the Inspired Pol could spare from other avocations ; and to have deBy Henry Ware, Jr. Minister of the Second Church ume. By Hervey Wilbur, A. M. Thirteenth edi- layed their publication much longer would have

tion. Stereotype. in Boston.-" Maximus vero studiorum fructus est,

deprived them of their chief interest.

Worcester's Sketches of the Earth and et velut præmium quoddam amplissimum longi la

This will account for, if it does not excuse, the boris, ex tempore dicendi facultas," Quinct. x. 7. it Inhabitants, with one hundred Engravings. De want of arrangement, and the desultory nature of signed as a reading book.

the contents of this volume. The notes were written Also for Sale.

Friend of Youth; or New Selection of at every moment of leisure during the author's reA Review of the Correspondence between Lessons in prose and verse, for schools and fami- sidence at the capital, and in the progress of his Hon. John Adams and the late W. Cunningham, lies, to imbue the young with sentiments of piety, journey through the country, and, with the single Esq. By Timothy Pickering.

humanity, and benevolence. By Noah Worcester, exception of the brief Historical Sketch, contained D. D. Second edition.

in the Appendix, the infomation they contain was The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispa

minuted at the time it was collected. han.

Cummings' Geography. Ninth edition.
Worcester's Geography. Third edition, the hope that a familiar account of that portion of

They are sent forth without any pretension, in
New Views of the Constitution of the
United States. By John Taylor of Caroline, Vir-
very much improved.

Mexico through which the author travelled, may

Cummings' First Lessons in Geography induce the reader to seek information froín better ginia.

and Astronomy, with seven Maps and a plate of sources; and with this view he recommends the The National Calendar, and Annals of the Solar System, for the use of Young Children. works of Lorenzana, Alzate, Clavigero, Boturini, the United States, for 1824, Vol. V. By Peter Fourth edition.

Mier, Robinson, and Humboldt; from all of which, Force.

Pronouncing Spelling Book, by J. A. but particularly from the latter, he has drawn libe A Course of Study preparatory to the Cummings. Third edition. This Spelling Book rally." Bar and the Senate; to which is annexed a Memoir contains every word of common use in our lanof the Private and Domestic Manners of the Ro- guage, that is difficult either to spell or pronounce.

RHETORIC. mans. By George Watterston.

The pronunciation is strictly conformed to that of Sketches of Connecticut, forty years Walker's Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, and is FOR sale by Cummings, HILLIARD, & Co.

BLAIR'S RHETORIC, improved by the addisince. 1 vol. 12mo.

so exactly and peculiarly denoted, that no one, who

knows the power of the letters, can mistake the tion of appropriate Marginal Questions, numbered Land of my sires! what mortal hand true pronunciation.

to correspond with References in the body of the Can e'er untie the filial band That knits me to thy rugged strand.

Cummings's Questions on the New Tes- page. By Nathaniel Greene.
Scotr.

tament, for Sabbath Exercises in Schools and Acad.

emies, with four Maps of the countries through THE Publishers of this Gazette furnish, O'Halloran; or the Insurgent Chief. An which our Saviour and his Apostles travelled.

on liberal terms, every book and every Irish Historic Tale of 1798. By the author of * The Wilderness," and the “Spectre of the For- bles, Testaments, Spelling Books, Dictionaries, fc.

C. H. & Co. have a great variety of Bi

periodical work of any value which America est.” 2 vols. 12mo.

Also, Inkstands, Quills, Drawing Paper, Writing affords. They have regular correspondents, Here, by the bonds of nature feebly held, Paper, Ink, Penknives, Scissors, Globes, and all ar- and make up orders on the tenth of every Minds combat minds, repelling and repelled; ticles usually wanted in Schools. Ferments arise, imprison'd factions roar,

month for England and France, and freReprest ambition struggles round the shore;

WORCESTER'S GEOGRAPHY. quently for Germany and Italy, and import Till overwrought, the general system feels Its motion stop, or frenzy fire the wheels.

CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & co. have from thence to order, books, in quantities GOLDSMITH.

just published a new and much improved edi. or single copies, for a moderate commisC. H. & Co. keep constantly on hand a tion of Worcester's Elements of Geography. This sion. Their orders are served by gentlesupply of Wilson's, and also of Gardner's Globes, edition is printed upon good paper, and every copy which they will sell as low as they can be afforded well bound; and to the Atlas is added a new Map men well qualified to select the best ediin the market. Wilson's Globes are 9 and 13 inch of the New England States, rendering it altogether tions, and are purchased at the lowest cash es, and Gardner's 12 inches-all suitable sizes for the best School Atlas in the market. schools and academies.

This Geography is required in all the Public prices. All new publications in any way
Schools in Boston, at Harvard University, and at noticed in this Gazette, they have for sale,

other Colleges.
NEW NOVEL.

or can procure on quite as good terms as CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & Co. have seen this Geography are invited to send for and ex: those of their respective publishers. amine the work.

CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & Co. just published SARATOGA, a Tale of the Revolution. In 2 vols. 12mo.

BREWSTER'S AND REES' CYCLOPÆDIA. “I know that we have all an innate love of our

CAMBRIDGE: country, and that the greatest men have been sensi- CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & Co. have

PRINTED AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS, ble to its attractions; but I know also, that it is a set of Brewster's Edinburgh Encyclopedia for only little minds which cannot shake off these sale at a reduced price; Also of Rees' Cyclopæfetters."- Petrarch. dia, complete with all the plates.

HILLIARD AND METCALF.

BY

THE UNITED STATES LITERARY GAZETTE.

Published on the first and fifteenth day of every month, by Cummings, Hilliard, & Co. No. 1 Cornhill, Boston.

-Terms, $5 per annum, payable in July.

VOL. I.

BOSTON, JULY 1, 1824.

No. 6.

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REVIEWS.

wars, and the evil passions that produce family had not quite run out in his time,

them. This minister of the gospel, thinks relinquished his intention, expressing withal A careful and free Inquiry into the Nature not with us; he thinks that the Quakers his belief that “ sum o' his bairns, or, aiblins,

have of late been suffered to get along too sum o' his bairns' bairns, wull migrate to and Tendency of the religious Principles

an- that laun o' free toleration,” and “ comof the Society of Friends, commonly call- quietly; he says, their principles

are ed Quakers, &c. By William Craig ti-christian, and evidently believes

, the pleet the wark, out o' the rich materials to

time has come, when some such able man be had in the toon of that singulair and Brownlee, A. M. Minister of the Gospel.

as himself should set about exposing them graite maun, Maister William Penn.” We Philadelphia, 1824. 8vo.

to universal reprobation. It is not strange regret, as the work did not see the light We are not Quakers, nor is religious con- that Mr B. should be a bigot, thinking that within the time that the old man seems to troversy, our favourite study; but when nothing can be believed or understood as have contemplated, that it should ever have this work was handed us a short time ago, it should be, by them who do not make his been produced. After the “ proem” folwe carefully read it, and the result of our creed their rule of belief,—for the world lows another address to the reader, setting reflections upon it we propose to give our holds many such unfortunate people; but it forth, what, we believe in spite of Mr readers. The principles of this sect have is strange, that he should think of attack- Brownlee's example, is the truth, that “rebeen often and thoroughly examined by ing with his most especial wrath, the reli- ligious inquiry, and even controversy, is others, and amply, and voluminously ex: gious principles of a society, which the best perfectly consistent with the loveliest explained by themselves; and we could not men of all denominations of Christians were, ercise of charity,", and that “politeness exactly understand why William Craig as we thought, willing to acknowledge as and courtesy should preside over religious Brownlee happened to think it worth while an established Christian sect. The man- debates.” How far this “minister of the for him to write this book at this time? ner of this attack is not less strange; in- gospel” has exercised charity, and how After all the examination--and it has been deed, we are very happy to acknowledge, much he is governed by the rules of politea close one that we have made of his book, that there is, throughout, a very laudable ness and courtesy, our readers will presentwe can discover no reasonable cause for conformity between the design of the work ly see, in the extracts which we purpose to this strange proceeding. We thought, to and its execution. His book begins by a make. Then follow what are called maxuse this author's own language, that “they formal dedication to his uncle, a professor ims; at the end of which he says, that the had taken their place” among Christian of anatomy in the University of Glasgow. Quakers in this controversy are the assailsects, that “they dwelt in the presence of Next follows an adverstisement to the read- ants, and he the defendant; because, all their brethren;" we thought, and still er, setting forth the author's diffidence saith he, the publication of the opinions of think, that a society, which, as a body, had |(which is the first and last time that his a society has in it the nature of an open gloriously distinguished itself in the pro- diffidence appears in the book), and hinting challenge! Of course, Mr Brownlee conmotion of many acts of justice and charity, that he has taken great pains in collecting siders himself as having undergone the a society, that early raised its voice against materials, and that if his work take with challenge of every body who has written a the slave trade-one of the foulest blots in the public, he may be induced to mention book; we hope our valiant champion will, the history of Christian nations, a society how much pains it cost him. Next is a in mercy to the “ reading public,"-who which has produced such men as Penn, and long and minute table of contents. Then must be in some sort seconds and bottle-holdBenezet, and Fothergill, and Reynolds, and comes what the author sees fit to call the ers--play recreant occasionally, and not which numbers among its members the he- proem, which occupies thirty-seven pages do battle on all these provocations. After roic Mrs Fry, might have been permitted with the story of the rebellion of the Pres- two mottos, we reach the first part of the to enjoy its own principles in peace. We byterians in Scotland, during the time of main work, which is styled “ An Historical thought, and still think, that the principles Charles II. ;-which is rendered peculiarly Dissertation on the Origin, Rise, &c. of the which led to actions such as theirs, are pleasant by a reference to the part that Society of Friends.” In this part he enjustly entitled to the denomination of Chris- the author's great-great-grandfather bore deavours to show, that certain opinions tian; for we are inclined, with all defer- therein. We are to understand that this held by Plato, with some modifications, ence to Mr Brownlee, to think there is tol- "great progenitor” was a star of pretty were also held by divers of the ancient erable authority for believing, that “ the considerable magnitude among the Presby- Christian writers in the first and second tree is known by its fruit." We thought, terians of old, as Mr B. succeeds in finding centuries of the Christian era, were receivas the Quakers say of themselves in the bim named in one book published about the ed by great numbers of the Greek Church, paragraph quoted as a sort of motto to the time, where, it seems that mention of him and, after the fall of the eastern empire, first part of the book on our table, that occurs in a sort of muster-roll of some pas- were also adopted by multitudes of the Lathey were “just considered as a good sort sengers in a certain ship that was wrecked tin Church, and continued in substance to of people in the main; who refused to fight, in the Orkneys. There is, in this same prevail till the time of Luther, and afterand to swear, and to pay tythes; and while proem, an account of the battle of Drum-wards spread widely among the Protestant the improved manners of the age allow that clog, and of Bothwell-bridge; which, as churches, and now form a part of the docfor these, and other singularities, they ought as well as the rest of this part of the trines of the Quakers. Allowing this to be not to be molested, the public, in general, work, is written in a style that strongly re- a correct genealogy, allowing that these cares little further about them;" and we minds us of Macpherson's Ossian, and opinions are correctly traced up to Plato, thonght further, that the Society was pro- Weems' Life of Washington. All we gath- who was not a Christian, still, it does not ducing by its Christian example, a salutary er from the proem that has any relation to follow from this that the doctrines are effect upon the nations in which it existed, the subject, may be comprised in one short false, and nobody, Quaker or not, supposes and slowly and imperceptibly changing for sentence, to wit

, that the author's aforesaid that this proves them to be true. A man the better, the views of mankind upon one ancestor designed to write a polemical work may believe many errors, and yet teach e two important subjects; as, for instance, I against the Quakers, but as the wit of the some truths, although our author cannot un.

30

are

ADVERTISEMENT.

CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & CO.

SCHOOL BOOKS.

NOTES ON MEXICO.
Have just published, and for sale, CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & CO. No. 1 JUST received, and for sale by Cun-

Cornhill, have constantly on hand the most MINGS, HILLIARD, & Co. Notes on MexSERMONS, by the late Rev: David Os- valuable and popular School and Classical Books

, ico, made in the Autumn of 1822. Accompanied good, D. D. Pastor of the Church in Medford. and furnish Schools and Academies at whole- by an Historical Sketch of the Revolution, and Hobomok; a Tale of early times. By sale prices.

Translations of the Official Reports on the present An American. 1 vol. 12mo. price 75 cents.

Among those which they have lately published state of that Country. With a Map. By a Citi

zen of the United States. 1 vol. 8vo. Then all this youthful paradise around,

Colburn's Arithmetic And all the broad and boundless mainland, lay

Both excellent ele

Do. Sequel Cooled by the interninable wood, that frowned

“The Notes, which form the subject of these

mentary works. O'er mount and vale.

Bryant. Elements of Astronomy, illustrated with pages, were written during the author's rapid jourA Discourse on the proper Test of the Plates, for the use of Schools and Academies, with ney through Mexico, in the autumn of 1822, and Christian Character, delivered at the Church in Questions. By John H. Wilkins, A. M. Second were addressed in letters to a friend, without any

intention of their ever being made public. But Brattle-Square, Boston, on Lord's Day, March 21, The New Testament, with References, the United States, in every thing relating to that

the deep and peculiar interest felt by the people of 1824. By Henry Colman. Second edition. A Practical Treatise upon the Authority and practical, designed to facilitate the acquisition the causes and character of the revolution which

and a Key Sheet of Questions, historical, doctrinal, country, and the imperfect accounts that exist of and Duty of Justices of the Peace in Criminal of Scriptural knowledge in Bible Classes,

Sunday it has lately undergone, have induced him to conProsecutions. By Daniel Davis, Solicitor General Schools, Common Schools, and private Families. sent to their publication. of Massachusetts. By Hervey Wilbur, A. M. Second edition, stereo

A Diary is not perhaps the best form for a work A General Abridgment and Digest of type.

of this description; nor is it that which the author

The Bible Class-Book; or Biblical Cate- himself would have preferred: but to have altered American Law, with occasional Notes and Comments. By Nathan Dane, LL. D. Counsellor at chism, containing Questions historical, doctrinal, the letters, so as to present a more connected narLaw. Volumes I. II. III.

practical, and experimental, designed to promote rative, would have required more time than be Hints on Extemporaneous Preaching. an intimate acquaintance with the Inspired Vol- could spare from other avocations; and to have deBy Henry Ware, Jr. Minister of the Second Church ume. By Hervey Wilbur, A. M. Thirteenth edi- layed their publication much longer would have

tion. Stereotype. in Boston.-“ Maximus vero studiorum fructus est,

deprived them of their chief interest.

This will account for, if it does not excuse, the

Worcester's Sketches of the Earth and et velut præmium quoddam amplissimum longi laboris, ex tempore dicendi facultas." Quinct. x. 7. it Inhabitants, with one hundred Engravings. De want of arrangement, and the desultory nature of signed as a reading book.

the contents of this volume. The notes were written Also for Sale.

Friend of Youth; or New Selection of at every moment of leisure during the author's reA Review of the Correspondence between Lessons in prose and verse, for schools and fami- sidence at the capital, and in the progress of his Hon. John Adams and the late W. Cunningham, lies, to imbue the young with sentiments of piety, journey through the country, and, with the single Esq. By Timothy Pickering. humanity, and benevolence. By Noah Worcester, exception of the brief Historical Sketch, contained

in the Appendix, the infomation they contain was D. D. Second edition. The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispa

minuted at the time it was collected.

Cummings' Geography. Ninth edition. han.

Worcester's Geography. Third edition, the hope that a familiar account of that portion of

They are sent forth without any pretension, in New Views of the Constitution of the

very

much improved. United States. By John Taylor of Caroline, Vir

Mexico through which the author travelled, may

Cummings First Lessons in Geography induce the reader to seek information froin better ginia.

and Astronomy, with seven Maps and a plate of sources; and with this view he recommends the The National Calendar, and Annals of the Solar System, for the use of Young Children. works of Lorenzana, Alzate, Clavigero, Boturini, the United States, for 1824, Vol. V. By Peter Fourth edition.

Mier, Robinson, and Humboldt; from all of which, Force.

Pronouncing Spelling Book, by J. A. but particularly from the latter, he has drawn libeA Course of Study preparatory to the Cummings. Third edition. This Spelling Book rally." Bar and the Senate; to which is annexed a Memoir contains every word of common use in our lanof the Private and Domestic Manners of the Ro- guage, that is difficult either to spell or pronounce.

RHETORIC. mans. By George Walterston.

The pronunciation is strictly conformed to that of Sketches of Connecticut, forty years so exactly and peculiarly denoted, that no one, who tion of appropriate Marginal Questions, numbered Walker's Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, and is FOR sale by CUMMINGS, Hilliard, & Co.

BLAIR'S RHETORIC, improved by the addisince. 1 vol. 12mo.

knows the power of the letters, can mistake the Land of my sires! what mortal hand true pronunciation.

to correspond with References in the body of the Can e'er untie the filial band That knits me to thy rugged strand.

Cummings's Questions on the New Tes- page. By Nathaniel Greene.
Scott.

tament, for Sabbath Exercises in Schools and Acad

emies, with four Maps of the countries through The Publishers of this Gazette furnish, O'Halloran ; or the Insurgent Chief. An which our Saviour and his Apostles travelled.

on liberal terms, every book and every Irish Historic Tale of 1798. By the author of

C. H. & Co. have a great variety of Bi- periodical work of any value which America “The Wilderness," and the “Spectre of the For

bles, Testaments, Spelling Books, Dictionaries, &c. est.” 2 vols. 12mo.

Also, Inkstands, Quills, Drawing Paper, Writing affords. They have regular correspondents, Here, by the bonds of nature feebly held, Paper, Ink, Penknives, Scissors, Globes, and all ar and make up orders on the tenth of every Minds combat minds, repelling and repelled;

ticles usually wanted in Schools. Ferments arise, imprison'd factions roar,

month for England and France, and freReprest ambition struggles round the shore;

quently for Germany and Italy, and import

WORCESTER'S GEOGRAPHY.
Till overwrought, the general system feels
Its motion stop, or frenzy fire the wheels.

CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & Co. have from thence to order, books, in quantities
GOLDSMITH.

just published a new and much improved edi- or single copies, for a moderate commisC. H. & Co. keep constantly on hand a tion of Worcester's Elements of Geography. This sion. Their orders are served by gentlesupply of Wilson's, and also of Gardner's Globes, edition is printed upon good paper, and every copy which they will sell as low as they can be afforded well bound; and to the Atlas is added a new Map men well qualified to select the best ediin the market. Wilson's Globes are 9 and 13 inch of the New England States, rendering it altogether tions, and are purchased at the lowest cash es, and Gardner's 12 inches--all suitable sizes for the best School Atlas in the market. schools and academies.

This Geography is required in all the Public prices. All new publications in any way Schools in Boston, at Harvard University, and at noticed in this Gazette, they have for sale,

other Colleges. NEW NOVEL.

not

or can procure on quite as good terms as CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & CO. have seen this Geography are invited to send for and ex- those of their respective publishers. amine the work.

CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & Co. just published SARATOGA, a Tale of the Revolution. In 2 vols. 12mo.

BREWSTER'S AND REES' CYCLOPÆDIA. “I know that we have all an innate love of our

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HILLIARD AND METCALF.

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Published on the first and fifteenth day of every month, by Cummings, Hilliard, & Co. No. 1 Cornhill, Boston.---Terins, $5 per annum, payable in July.
VOL. I.
BOSTON, JULY 1, 1824.

No. 6.

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REVIEWS.

wars, and the evil passions that produce family had not quite run out in his time,

them. This minister of the gospel, thinks relinquished his intention, expressing withal A careful and free Inquiry into the Nature not with us: he thinks that the Quakers his belief that “ sum o' his bairns, or, aiblins,

have of late been suffered to get along too sum o' his bairns' bairns, wull migrate to and Tendency of the religious Principles

an- that laun o’ free toleration,” and “comof the Society of Friends, commonly call- quietly; he says, their principles are ed Quakers, Sc. By William Craig ti-christian, and evidently believes

, the pleet the wark, out o' the rich materials to

time has come, when some such able man be had in the toon of that singulair and Brownlee, A. M. Minister of the Gospel.

as himself should set about exposing them graite maun, Maister William Penn.” We Philadelphia, 1824. 8vo.

to universal reprobation. It is not strange regret, as the work did not see the light We are not Quakers, nor is religions con- that Mr B. should be a bigot, thinking that within the time that the old man seems to

troversy our favourite study; but when nothing can be believed or understood as have contemplated, that it should ever have this work was handed us a short time ago, it should be, by them who do not make his been produced. After the “ proem” folwe carefully read it, and the result of our creed their rule of belief,—for the world lows another address to the reader, setting reflections upon it we propose to give our holds many such unfortunate people ; but it forth, what, we believe in spite of Mr readers. The principles of this sect have is strange, that he should think of attack- Brownlee's example, is the truth, that “rebeen often and thoroughly examined by ing with his most especial wrath, the reli- ligious inquiry, and even controversy, is others, and amply, and voluminously, ex- gious principles of a society, which the best perfectly consistent with the loveliest explained by themselves; and we could not men of all denominations of Christians were, ercise of charity," and that “politeness exactly understand why William Craig as we thought, willing to acknowledge as and courtesy should preside over religious Brownlee happened to think it worth while an established Christian sect. The man- debates.” How far this “minister of the for him to write this book at this time? ner of this attack is not less strange; in- gospel” has exercised charity, and how After all the examination and it has been deed, we are very happy to acknowledge, much he is governed by the rules of politea close one—that we have made of his book, that there is, throughout, a very laudable ness and courtesy, our readers will presentwe can discover no reasonable cause for conformity between the design of the work ly see, in the extracts which we purpose to this strange proceeding. We thought, to and its execution. His book begins by a make. Then follow what are called maxuse this author's own language, that “they formal dedication to his uncle, a professor ims; at the end of which he says, that the had taken their place” among Christian of anatomy in the University of Glasgow. Quakers in this controversy are the assailsects, that “they dwelt in the presence of Next follows an adverstisement to the read- ants, and he the defendant; because, all their brethren;" we thought, and still er, setting forth the author's diffidence saith he, the publication of the opinions of think, that a society, which, as a body, had (which is the first and last time that his a society has in it the nature of an open gloriously distinguished itself in the pro-diffidence appears in the book), and hinting challenge! Of course, Mr Brownlee conmotion of many acts of justice and charity, that he has taken great pains in collecting siders himself as having undergone the a society, that early raised its voice against materials, and that if his work take with challenge of every body who has written a the slave trade-one of the foulest blots in the public, he may be induced to mention book; we hope our valiant champion will

, the history of Christian nations, a society how much pains it cost him. Next is a in mercy to the “reading public,"--who which has produced such men as Peon, and long and minute table of contents. Then must be in some sort seconds and bottle-holdBenezet, and Fothergill, and Reynolds, and comes what the author sees fit to call the ers,-play recreant occasionally, and not which numbers among its members the be- proem, which occupies thirty-seven pages do battle on all these provocations. After roic Mrs Fry, might have been permitted with the story of the rebellion of the Pres- two mottos, we reach the first part of the to enjoy its own principles in peace. We byterians in Scotland, during the time of main work, which is styled “ An Historical thought, and still think, that the principles Charles II.;-which is rendered peculiarly Dissertation on the Origin, Rise, &c. of the which led to actions such as theirs, are pleasant by a reference to the part that Society of Friends.” In this part he enjustly entitled to the denomination of Chris- the author's great-great-grandfather bore deavours to show, that certain opinions tian; for we are inclined, with all defer- therein. We are to understand that this held by Plato, with some modifications, ence to Mr Brownlee, to think there is tol-“great progenitor” was a star of pretty were also held by divers of the ancient erable authority for believing, that " the considerable magnitude among the Presby- Christian writers in the first and second

tree is known by its fruit." We thought, terians of old, as Mr B. succeeds in finding centuries of the Christian era, were receivas the Quakers say of themselves in the him named in one book published about the ed by great numbers of the Greek Church, paragraph quoted as a sort of motto to the time, where, it seems that mention of him and, after the fall of the eastern empire, first part of the book on our table, that occurs in a sort of muster-roll of some pas- were also adopted by multitudes of the Lathey were “just considered as a good sort sengers in a certain ship that was wrecked tin Church, and continued in substance to of people in the main; who refused to fight, in the Orkneys. There is, in this same prevail till the time of Luther, and afterand to swear, and to pay ty thes; and while proem, an account of the battle of Drum-wards spread widely among the Protestant the improved manners of the age allow that clog, and of Bothwell-bridge ; which, as churches, and now form a part of the docfor these, and other singularities, they ought as well as the rest of this part of the trines of the Quakers. Allowing this to be not to be molested, the public, in general, work, is written in a style that strongly re- a correct genealogy, allowing that these cares little further about them;" and we minds us of Macpherson’s Ossian, and opinions are correctly traced up to Plato, thought further, that the Society was pro- Weems' Life of Washington. All we gath- who was not a Christian, still, it does not ducing by its Christian example, a salutary er from the proem that has any relation to follow from this that the doctrines are effect upon the nations in which it existed, the subject, may be comprised in one short false, and nobody, Quaker or not, supposes and slowly and imperceptibly changing for sentence, to wit, that the author's aforesaid that this proves them to be true. A man the better, the views of mankind upon one ancestor designed to write a polemical work may believe many errors, and yet teach or two important subjects; as, for instance, I against the Quakers, but as the wit of the some truths, although our author cannot un

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