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declares to have possessed the feelings of a Reginald Dalton. By the author of Valerius, ed the corner from the street, some retreating, appoet, could gravely publish, and call by the and Adam Blair. 12mo. 2 vols.

parently, and others following ; for, though none of name of poetry, a volume of stanzas like This work is altogether inferior to Valerius, and anger in the tones of the voices.

them were moving at speed, there was opposition this, from “ The song of the Soul, contain- but it is inferior, as it is produced by a less Say the word, then ; speak it out,' cried one ing a Christiano-Platonicall display of powerful and sustained exertion of the same voice. , Say Town, d—ye, or rl floor your Life." talents. It does not, like that admirable

carcass.'

Gown or Town?' roared another; 'speak, or That rabble rout that in this castell won, tale, stir up the spirit with the solemn and

by jingo Is Ireful Ignorance, Unseenly Zeal,

magnificent picture of scenes and charac- Stand back, stand back, I say; halt, you knaves,' Strong Self-conceit, Rotten Religion,

ters and ages, invested with an almost sanc-shouted a third— I am a clergyman. Contentious reproach against Michael, If he of Moses' body aught reveal,

tified interest ;-but it is a very pleasant ** Reginald could no longer be mistaken: He Which their dull senses cannot easily reach;

and interesting novel, which no one could seized the poker, got out upon the balcony, and Love of the carkass, an inept appeal write without the aid of brilliant and varied dropt on the pavement in a twinkling.

Gown or Town? Gown or Town ?" T' uncertain papers, a false formal fetch

talents, and few can read without pleasure • Cowards! rascals! back, you scoundrels ! of feigned sighs ; contempt of poor and sinful if not profit. The hero is a young man, Mr Keith, Mr Keith, here stand beside me, sir.' wretch." who leaves his father in a country vicarage,

"A violent tussle ensued : one fellow aimed a The name of Waller's mistress (Saccha- goes to Oxford, becomes dissipated, spends blow at the priest's head, which he parried secunrissa) well expresses the cloying feelings, more money than he should, falls into many that attacked Reginald, one got a push in the midriff

dum artem, and returned with energy. Of two which the eternal repetition in musical difficulties, and among others, into love; and that made him sick as a dog; the other, after instanzas, of extravagant hyperbole upon after much distress extricates himself by flicting a sharp cut with his stick, was repaid by a female charms, must produce in the mind good fortune and good conduct, marries his crashing blow that might have shivered the scapula of every reader who has the patience in mistress, and recovers the family estates of a Molineaux. The priest and another fellow, these days to look at what was then writ- which had been iniquitously withheld from getting into close embrace, rolled down together, ten about his father.

town uppermost, in the kennel. Black eyes and

bloody noses were a drug. Reginald broke a Amoret, as sweet and good

This novel is of very equal interest bludgeon; but the poker flew from his grasp in doAs the most delicious food, &c. &c. &c. &c. throughout, and almost any extracts would ing so. Fists sounded like hammers for a few secDryden is a reverend name; but though be fair specimens; but the living and mov- onds; and then Town, first retreating for a few Pope contrived to keep the runnings of his ing picture of Oxford entertained us more paces in silence, turned absolute tail, and ran into

the street screaming and bellowing, “Town! style sprightly, by mingling it with that of than any other part of the book, and we pre- Town! TOWN?" Boileau; yet from the hands of Darwin the sent to our readers some of its principal

The priest is a little injured in the scufpublic found that the draught was too vafeatures.

fle,-Dalton waits upon him home, and there pid; it was become like the milk that “A very prosaic animal must he be, who for the catches a glimpse of the heroine, who is Bloomfield tells of in his “ Farmer's Boy,”

first time traverses that noble and ancient City of indeed most delightfully conceived and

the Muses, without acknowledging the influences Three times skimmed-skyblue. of the GENIUS Locr; and never was man or youth drawn; she has almost all the delicacy It is needless to pursue the history to our less ambitious of resisting such influences than and innocent purity and fortitude of the own times, seeing that none of the styles Reginald Dalton. Born and reared in a wild, se. Athanasia of Valerius, and much more than since Pope's can be said to be worn out, town of any sort, until he began the journey now

questered province, he had never seen any great all her spirit and life. though Rogers has made that of Goldsmith just about to be concluded. Almost at the same

“A soft female voice said from within, · Who's

there? a little too drawling. Neither do we think hour of the preceding evening, he had entered Bir

• It's me, my darling,' answered the old man, and it necessary to trace the similar mutations mingham; and what a contrast was here! No which the poetry of France and Italy has dark, narrow brick lanes, crowded with wagons, the door was opened. A young girl, with a candle

no flaring shop-windows, passed and repassed by in her hand, appeared in the entrance, and uttered undergone. We believe however from this jostling multitudes,no discordant cries, no sight's something anxiously and quickly in a language hasty survey, that we may safely pronounce of tumult, no ring of anvils-every thing wearing kind," he answered—“ my bonny lassic, it's a mere

which Reginald did not understand. «Mein susses it to be a dangerous thing for a young man, the impress of a grave, peaceful stateliness-hoary who is ambitious of becoming a poct, to towers, antique battlements

, airy porticos, majestic scart, just a Nea-bite--I'm all safe and sound, study his cotemporaries; he will be tempt-ion on either side lofty poplars and elms ever low me to have the honour of presenting, you to

colonades, following each other in endless success thanks to this young gentleman.-Mr. Dalton, aled to admire one more than another; this and anon lifting their heads against the sky, as if my neice, Miss Hesketh. Miss Hesketh, Îlr. Dalexclusive admiration will lead him to direct from the heart of those magnificent seclusions-Lion.

But we shall be better acquainted hereafter, imitation of his favourite; and thus he will wide, spacious, solemn streets—every where a

I trust.' become the copyist of another's stylc, in- monastic stillness and a Gothic grandeur. Except- The old man shook Reginald most affectionatestead of being (according to the first meaning now and then some solitary gowned man pac- ly by the hand, and repeating his request that he

ing slowly in the moonlight, there was not a soul should go instantly home, be entered the house ing of the name he seeks) the Maker of his in the High-street; nor, excepting here and there the door was closed--and Reginald stood alone own. But he may fearlessly ponder over

a lamp twinkling in some high lonely tower,' upon the way. The thing had passed in a single the works of his predecessors, for common where some one might, or might not, be unspher- instant, yet when the vision withdrew, the boy felt sense will teach him to avoid the reviving ing the spirit of Plato,' was there any thing to show as if that angel-face could never quit his imaginathat the venerable buildings which lined it were

tion. So fai of an antiquated style.

so pensive--yet so sweet and light a

smile-such an air of hovering, timid grace-such Therefore are we glad to see Percy's actually inhabited.”

a clear, soft eye-such raven, silken tresses beneath Reliques republished in this country; the

Dalton is shown to a tavern, and is soon

that flowing veil-never had his eye beheld such a simplicity and elegance of many of the induced to leap from the window thercof, creature—it vas as if he had had one momentary songs and ballads cannot fail to please, and by an assault on Mr Keith, a Catholic glimpse into some purer, happier, lovlier world

than this." their day of dangerous popularity is gone clergyman, with whom he had become ac

" He stood for some moments riveted to the spot by. of the numerous imitations which quainted, and who is quite an important

where this beautiful vision had gleamed upon him. followed their first publication, few have personage in the story.

He looked up and saw, as he thought, something survived, and of these, few that we have “ The bed-room, to which Betty Chambermaid white at one of the windows—but that too was seen are worth reading except those of conducted our young gentleman, was in a part of the gonel; and, after a little winile, he began to walk Lucius Junius Mickle. He was a genuine house very remote from their supper-parlour. It is back slowly into the city. He could not, however,

one of a great number situated along the line of an but pause again for a moment when he reached poet, whose works have been too much neg- open wooden gallery, and its windows look out up the bridge ;-the tall fair tower of Magdalen aplected; but he translated, and he imitated, on a lanc branching from the street that gives en-peared so exquisitely beautiful above its circling and he is almost forgotten.

trance to the inn. Reginald, seeing that there was groves--and there was something so soothing to We shall in our next number proceed to still fine moonlight, went to the window to peep out his inagination (pensive as it was at the moment) examine somewhat more closely, the char- threw up the sash, and was leaning over the balco-him fuithin its fringe of willows. He stood lean

for a moment, ere he should undress himself. He in the dark Now of the Cherwel gurgling below acter and uses of the work, whose title we

ny, contemplating a noble Gothic archway on the ing øver the parapet, enjoying the solemn loveliove prefixed to this article.

other side of the lane, when several persons turn- ness of the scene, when, of a suuden, the universal

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THE UNITED STATES LITERARY GAZETTE. .

per, Esq?

Published on the first and fifteenth day of every month, by Cummings, Hilliard, & Co. No. 1 Cornhill, Boston.--Terms, $5 per annum, payable in July.
VOL. I.
BOSTON, APRIL 1, 1824.

No. 1. two PROSPECTUS.

occasionally inserted. In freely admitting of every month. Each number will con

prose or poetry of a miscellaneous charac- tain 16 quarto pages—one or two of which ave determined to publish a new ter, we shall not depart from our leading may be used for advertisements—and will Priv

I work, and as many are now principle of making the Gazette a national be printed on paper of superior quality. Friends." in this country, and many more work, because, we may thus assist the de- It will be sent to distant subscribers on the the possess attempted and abandoned, we velopment and cultivation of domestic tal- day of publication, by the mail of that day, D. Rector •vour to state at some length, ent, and the articles we publish will give or in any other way they shall prescribe.

Females in commencing another. some indication of the strength and charac- Terms--$5 per annum, payable in six
By the aut perfectly aware how difficult it ter of the intellectual power already exist- months from its commencement. Subscrip-
A Tre.
overcome the indifference, works ing and exerted amongst us.

tions received at our Bookstore, No. 1 CornIn two v

we propose, encounter at their We shall not aim at giving a value to our hill. CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & Co. of Linco Notes a'Ne do, however, expect success, Gazette by profound researches into science Boston, Feb. 1824. By Danwe are confident of our ability to and philosophy, or by lengthened and intrichusetts Literary Gazette, which shall be cate speculations. Our numbers shall not The editor of this paper is perfectly sen

Pic!seful to the reading public of this be filled with literary gossip; neither shall sible of his inability to sustain alone the Massa; and to all who are interested in they be composed of articles which are not burthen of such a work as, it is hoped, this

A relative to literature, either in the to be understood and appreciated but with will become. But his extensive and very E business or amusement. We have a degree of labor almost equal to that re- satisfactory arrangements with gentlemen

een and felt the want of such a work; quired for their composition, and cannot be who stand high among the scholars and tilope to supply an existing demand ; to enjoyed without a singularity of taste and writers of our country, encourage him to per to a large portion of this community, mental habits. We shall endeavour to avoid believe, that the Literary Gazette, he is

gratification suited to their tastes and not with equal care both these extremes, and about to conduct, will be a valuable addinow provided for them.

we now offer our first number to the public, tion to our periodical literature. We shall endeavour to give to the United that by it they may judge of our plan, and No existing journal, at least none in this States Literary Gazette, a strictly national of the means we have provided for its exe country, actually performs the uses of a character. If we do not fail in executing cution. We however ask, what in common General Review; and it will be a leading our intentions, it will communicate a dis- equity must be granted, that the difficulties principle in the conduct of the Gazette, to tinct and accurate impression of the literary of making a beginning should be duly con- maintain this character. It is obviously and intellectual condition and progress of this sidered. Many gentlemen have engaged impossible that any individual should critcountry. A large proportion of our pages to contribute to our pages, and in justice to icise justly books of every sort; the editor will be filled with reviews of works publish- them it is proper for us to say, that among certainly would not think of undertaking a ed here, either of domestic or foreign ori- them are minds as highly gifted by nature, task so far beyond his ability; but he has to gin; every book which issues from the press and as well nurtured and disciplined by thank many who honour him with their of this country, and comes within our reach, habits of study and composition, as those friendship, for the kindness, which has promshall receive from us such notice as its employed in the support of any periodical ised to this work the assistance of such a character and pretensions deserve. We work in this land.

variety and extent of talent and knowlshall also publish whatever interesting in- Some pages of each number will be filled edge, as may almost ensure to all the classes formation we can gather, concerning our with Literary and Scientific Intelligence. of the reading community a just account national literature, education, and public Great care and assiduity will be used to of every work, which is offered to them opinions.

ensure to this department of the Gazette, and is important enough to deserve any Books intended to subserve the purposes interest and value. It may be well to re- notice.

T. P. of education, have, within a few years, been mark, that our extensive connexion with greatly improved and multiplied. Much of booksellers, at home and abroad, will enable the best talent and skill of this age has us to supply our editors and contributors

REVIEWS. been employed upon mere school books; promptly, with almost every new publicaand histories, travels, tales, &c. calculated tion of every kind.

Course of Instruction in the Public Schools for the tastes and requirements of youth, No injury to the established Journals, can

in Boston Boston, 1823. 8vo. have been written with great power, print- be involved in the success of our proposed Tuis pamphlet is filled with valuable ined in the cheapest forms, and circulated work; many of them are useful and hon- formation. The public instruction providthroughout the community with strenuous orable to the literature of this country, and ed by the city of Boston for all her citiindustry. Such works must exert a power- we should deeply regret to impede their zens, who are disposed to avail themselves ful influence, either of good or evil; we usefulness or lessen its rewards. We be- of it, is an almost unexampled instance of think they have not received due attention long to the same class of literary works, that true wisdom which is one with just libfrom the journals professedly devoted to but our paths lie in different directions ; erality. It is not the effort of individuals reviewing the current literature of the age; and it cannot be doubted, that literary pub- to build an asylum for resourceless poverty. and shall endeavour to supply this deficien- lications profit each other, by increasing or to establish permanent relief for the cy by making our readers acquainted with and confirming the appetite which demands wretched ;—but it is a magnanimous deterthe true character of all books, written to and enjoys them. A successful work, al- mination and endeavour of a body politic, aid them in a work of such importance as most of necessity, enlarges the circle of to prevent the severest evils which embitter the education of their children.

those, who are prepared to read with pleas- life and render it useless; to remove the Notices of foreign works, which lead to ure another work of a similar character. efficient and fertile sources of misery and topics or considerations applicable to the The United States Literary Gazette will sin, by sıfıstituting the unspeakable good of affairs or interests of this country, will be be published on the first and fifteenth day education, for a childhood and youth of un

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declares to have possessed the feelings of a | Reginald Dalton. By the author of Valerius, ed the corner from the street, some retreating, appoet, could gravely publish, and call by the and Adam Blair. 12mo. 2 vols. parently, and others following; for, though none of name of poetry, a volume of stanzas like This work is altogether inferior to Valerius, and anger in the tones of the voices.

them were moving at speed, there was opposition this, from “ The song of the Soul, contain- but it is inferior, as it is produced by a less Say the word, then; speak it out,' cried one ing a Christiano-Platonicall display of powerful and sustained exertion of the same voice. Say Town, dye, or I'll floor your Life." talents. It does not, like that admirable carcass.'

Gown or Town?' roared another; speak, or That rabble rout that in this castell won, tale, stir up the spirit with the solemn and

by jingo Is Ireful Ignorance, Unseemly Zeal, magnificent picture of scenes and charac

Stand back, stand back, I say; halt, you knaves,' Strong Self-conceit, Rotten Religion,

ters and ages, invested with an almost sanc-shouted a third—I am a clergyman.' Contentious reproach against Michael, If he of Moses' body aught reveal, tified interest;—but it is a very pleasant

"Reginald could no longer be mistaken: He Which their dull senses cannot easily reach ; and interesting novel, which no one could seized the poker, got out upon the balcony, and Love of the carkass, an inept appeal write without the aid of brilliant and varied dropt on the pavement in a twinkling.

Gown or Town? Gown or Town ?' T' uncertain papers, a false formal fetch talents, and few can read without pleasure Cowards! rascals ! back, you scoundrels ! Of feigned sighs ; contempt of poor and sinful if not profit. The hero is a young man, Mr Keith, Mr Keith, here stand beside me, sir.' wretch." who leaves his father in a country vicarage,

"A violent tussle ensued : one fellow aimed a The name of Waller's mistress (Saccha- goes to Oxford, becomes dissipated, spends blow at the priest's head. which he parried secunrissa) well expresses the cloying feelings, more money than he should, falls into many that attacked Reginald, one got a push in the midriff

dum artem, and returned with energy.

Of two which the eternal repetition in musical difficulties, and among others, into love; and that made him sick as a dog; the other, after instanzas, of extravagant hyperbole upon after much distress extricates himself by flicting a sharp cut with his stick, was repaid by a female charms, must produce in the mind good fortune and good conduct, marries his crashing blow that might have shivered the scapula of every reader who has the patience in mistress, and recovers the family estates of a Molineaux. The priest and another fellow, these days to look at what was then writ- which had been iniquitously withheld from getting into close embrace, rolled down together

, ten about his father.

Black eyes and

bloody noses were a drug. Reginald broke a Amoret, as sweet and good

This novel is of very equal interest bludgeon; but the poker flew from his grasp in doAs the most delicious food, &c. &c. &c. &c.

throughout, and almost any extracts would ing so. Fists sounded like hammers for a few secDryden is a reverend name ; but though be fair specimens; but the living and mov- onds; and then Town, first retreating for a few Pope contrived to keep the runnings of his ing picture of Oxford entertained us more paces in silence, turned absolute tail, and ran into

the street screaming and bellowing, “Town! style sprightly, by mingling it with that of than any other part of the book, and we pre- Town! Town?"" Boileau; yet from the hands of Darwin the sent to our readers some of its principal

The priest is a little injured in the scufpublic found that the draught was too vafeatures.

fle,-Dalton waits upon him home, and there pid; it was become like the milk that A very prosaic animal must he be, who for the catches a glimpse of the heroine, who is Bloomfield tells of in his “ Farmer's Boy,"

first time traverses that noble and ancient City of indeed most delightfully conceived and

the Muses, without acknowledging the influences Three times skimmed-skyblue. of the Genius Loci; and never was manor youth drawn; she has almost all the delicacy It is needless to pursue the history to our less ambitious of resisting such influences than and innocent purity and fortitude of the own times, seeing that none of the styles Reginald Dalton. Born and reared in a wild, se: Athanasia of Valerius

, and much more than since Pope's can be said to be worn out, town of any sort, until he began the journey now

questered province, he had never seen any great all her spirit and life. though Rogers has made that of Goldsmith just about to be concluded. Almost at the same

“ A soft female voice said from within, . Who's a little too drawling. Neither do we think hour of the preceding evening, he had entered Bir- there?"

It's me, my darling,' answered the old man, and it necessary to trace the similar mutations mingham; and what a contrast was here ! No which the poetry of France and Italy has dark, narrow brick lanes, crowded with wagons, the door was opened. A young girl, with a candle undergone. We believe however from this jostling multitudes,no discordant cries, no sights something anxiously and quickly in a language

no faring shop-windows, passed and repassed by in her hand, appeared in the entrance, and uttered hasty survey, that we may safely pronounce of tumult, no ring of anviis-every thing wearing which Reginald did not understand. Mein susses it to be a dangerous thing for a young man, the impress of a grave, peaceful stateliness-hoary kind,' he answered— my bonny lassie, it's a mere who is ambitious of becoming a poet, to towers, antique battlements, airy porticos, majestic scart, just a flea-bite-I'm ail safe and sound, study his cotemporaries; he will be temp!ion on either side-lofty poplars and elms ever colonades, following each other in endless success

thanks to this young gentleman.-Mr. Dalton, al

low me to have the honour of presenting you to ed to admire one more than another; this and anon listing their heads against the sky, as if my neice, Miss Hesketh. Miss Hesketh, Mr. Dalexclusive admiration will lead him to direct from the heart of those magnificent seclusions-Lion

But we shall be better acquainted hereafter, imitation of his favourite; and thus he will wide, spacious, solemn streets--every where a

I trust.' become the copyist of another's style, in monastic stillness and a Gothic grandeur. Exceptly by the hand, and repeating his request that he

" The old man shook Reginald most affectionatestead of being (according to the first meaning now and then some solitanereowned man paci should go instantly home, he entered the house ing of the name he seeks) the Maker of his in the High-street; nur, excepting here and there the door was closed--and Reginald stood alone own. But he may fearlessly ponder over

a lamp twinkling in some high lonely tower,' upon the way. The thing had passed in a single the works of his predecessors, for common where some one might, or might not be unspher- instant, yet when the vision withdrew, the boy felt sense will teach him to avoid the reviving ing the spirit of Plato,' was there any ihing to show as if that angel-face could never quit his imaginaof an antiquated style. that the venerable buildings which lined it were

tion. So fair, so pensive-yet so sweet and light a

smile--such an air of hovering, timid grace-such Therefore are we glad to see Percy's actually inhabited.” Reliques republished in this country ; the

Dalton is shown to a tavern, and is soon that flowing veil-never had his eye beheld such a

a clear, soft eye-such raven, silken tresses beneath simplicity and elegance of many of the induced to leap from the window thereof, creature – it v. as as if he had had one momentary songs and ballads cannot fail to please, and by an assault on Mr Keith, a Catholic glimpse int, some purer, happier, lovlier world

than this." their day of dangerous popularity is gone clergyman, with whom he had become ac

" He stood for some moments riveted to the spot by. of the numerous imitations which quainted, and who is quite an important

where this beautiful vision had gleamed upon him. followed their first publication, few have personage in the story.

He looked up and saw. as he thought, something survived, and of these, few that we have “ The bed-room, to which Betty Chambermaid whit' at one of the windows—but that too was seen are worth reading except those of conducted our young gentleman, was in a part of the gone'; and, after a little while, he began to walk Lucius Junius Mickle. He was a genuine

house very remote from their supper-parlour. It is back slowly into the city. He could not, however,

one of a great number situated along the line of an but rsause again for a moment when he reached poet, whose works have been too much neg- open wooden gallery, and its windows look out up the bridge ;-the tall fair tower of Magdalen aplected; but he translated, and he imitated, on a lane branching from the street that gives en pear al so exquisitely beautiful above its circling and he is almost forgotten.

trance to the inn. Reginald, seeing that there was grové's--and there was something so soothing to We shall in our next number proceed to still fine moonlight, went to the window to peep out bis il nagination (pensive as it was at the moment)

for a moment, ere he should undress himself.' He in the dark flow of the Cherwel gurgling below examine somewhat more closely, the char- threw up the sash, and was leaning over the balco- him within its fringe of willows. He stood leanarter and uses of the work, whose title we

ny, contemplating a noble Gothic archway on the ing over the parapet, enjoying the solemn loveliave prefixed to this article.

other side of the lane, when several persons turn- ness of the scene, when, of a sudden, the universal

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upon

stillness was disturbed once more by a clamour of | night-cap to the alarum of— Town! Town! Long | plump pet poodle upon the hearth-rug—these were rushing feet and impetuous voices."

and loud the tumult continued in its fearful rage, among the by no means curta supeller,' of this more Then follows the story of an Oxford row, and much excellent work was accomplished.'*** mundane thinking shop.'-A gay-looking junior told at some length and with infinite hu- fellow, broad in the chest, narrow in the pelvis, the Head himself, a rubicund old gentleman in

Reginald, although a nimble and active young fellow and chaplain was caressing the poodle, and mour and vivacity. We can extract only thick in the neck, and lightsome in the region of grand canonicals and a grizzle wig, was seated in a its closing scenes. the bread-basket, a good leaper, and a runner dignified posture in a superb

fauteuil, while a pad" In short, by this time the High-street of Oxford among ten thousand, was not, as has been formerly ded footstool sustained in advance his gouty left leg." exhibited a scene as different from its customary mentioned, a fencer; neither was he a wrestler, nor

A dinner in the college hall is circumsolemnity and silence, as it is possible to imagine. a boxer, nor an expert hand at the baton. These Conceive several hundreds of young men in caps, were accomplishments of which, his education stantially and somewhat temptingly set or gowns, or both, but all of them, without excep- having, according to Mr Macdonald's taunt, been forth. tion, wearing some part of their academical insig- negleckit,' he had yet received scarcely the slightpia, retreating before a band rather more numerous, est tincture. The consequence was, that the

“ The external features of an old English monasmade up of apprentices, journeymen, labourers, whole, though his exertions were neither few nor tery, are still perceived in our academical hospitia, bargemen—a motley mixture of every thing that, far between, he was, if mauling were sin, fully but, alas! a dinner there is now shorn of much of in the phrase of that classical region, passes under more sinned against than sinning. The last thing its fair proportion, and presents, at the best, but a the generic name of Roff. Several casual disturb- he could charge his memory withal, when he after faint and faded image of the glories of eld.' ances had occurred in different quarters of the ward endeavoured to arrange its • disjecta fragmen- Enough, nevertheless, of the ancient form and town, a thing quite familiar to the last and all pre- ta,' was the vision of a brawny arm uplifted over circumstance is still preserved, to impress, in no ceding ages, and by no means uncommon even in against him, and the moon shedding her light very trivial measure, the imagination of bim who, for those recent days, whatever may be the case now. distinctly upon the red spoke of a coach-wheel, the first time, is partaker in the feast--and it was

The solenin bell, sounding as is of the host of youthful academics, just arrived for with which that arm appeared to be intimately so with our hero.

some great ecclesiastical dignitary were about to the beginning of the term, a considerable number connected.”

be consigned to mother earth--the echoing vestihad, as usual, been quartered for this night in the The apartments of a learned and labori- bule—the wide and lofty staircase, lined with serv. different inns of the city. Some of these, all full of ous Fellow of the College, are contrasted ing-men so old and demure that they might almost wine and mischief, had first rushed out and swell with those of its indolent and luxurious have been mistaken for so many pieces of grotesque ed a mere passing scuffle into something like a substantial row. Herds of town-boys, on the other Head, who had obtained his office by means statuary—the hall itself, with its high lancet winhand, had been rapidly assembled by the magic in- not altogether the most honourable.

dows of stained glass, and the brown obscurity of fluence of their accustomed war-cry. The row

its oaken roof—the yawning chimneys with their once formed into regular shape in the Corn-market,

“ He began writing eagerly, and continued to do blazing logs—the long narrow tables--the elevated the clamour had penetrated walls, and overleapt so for perhaps a quarter

of an hour, without taking dais, the array of gowned guests—the haughty battlements; from college to college the madness any further notice of Reginald's presence. The line of seniors seated in stall-like chairs, and sepahad spread and flown. Porters had been knocked boy, meanwhile, full of serious thoughts and high rated by an ascent of steps from the younger indown in one quarter, iron-bound gates forced in hermit round and round, as if he had expected the at one end of the hall, and slowly re-chanted from

resolutions, perused the chamber of the learned mates of the mansion--the Latin grace, chanted another, and the rope-ladder, and the sheet-ladder, and the headlong leap, had all been put into requi- inspiration of lore to be breathed from its walls

, the other—the deep silence maintained during the sition, with as much eager, frantic, desperate zeal, The room was part of a very ancient building, and repast-the bearded and mitred visages frowning as if every old monastic tower had been the scene every thing about it was stamped with antiquity. from every wall—there was something so antique,

The high roof of dark unvarnished oak--the one so venerable, and withal so novel in the scene, that of an unquenchable fire, every dim cloistered quad- | tall

, narrow window, sunk deep in the massy wall it was no wonder our youth felt enough of curiosirangle of a yearning earthquake. " A terrible conflict ensued--a conflict, the fury

-the venerable volumes with which the sides of ty, and withal, of a certain sort of awe, to prevent of which might have inspired lightness, vigour, and the apartment were every where clothed—the bare him for once from being able to handle his knife elasticity, even into the paragraphs of a Bentham, wainscot floor, accurately polished, but destitute of and fork quite a la Roxburgher. or the hexameters of a Southey-had either or carpeting, excepting one small fragment under the “These feelings, of course, were not partaken both of these eminent persons been there to wit-table--the want of furniture—for there were just by the rest of the company, least of all, by the ness—better still had they been there to partake in, ed, ere he himself could occupy one of them—the at • The High Table' of ** two chairs, and a heap of folios had been dislodg: senior and more elevated portion of it. The party

was as usual an acthe genial frenzy. It was now that. The Science,' chilliness of the place too, for, although the day was tive, and, as it happened on this day, it was by no (to use the language of Thalaba,) 'made itself to

means a small one. be felt.' It was now that in the words of Words frosty, there was no fire in the grate-all these, to

Red faces grew redder and worth,) 'the power of cudgels was a visible thing:'tenance of the solitary tenant, and the fire of necks were seen swelling in every vein, and ears

gether with the wom, emaciated, and pallid coun- redder as the welcome toil proceeded-short fat It was now that many a gown covered, as erst that learned zeal which glowed so bright in his fixed half-hid by luxuriant periwigs could not conccal of the Lady Christabel, • half a bosom and a side!

and steadfast, but nevertheless melancholy eye, their voluptuous twinklings; vigorously plied the A sight to dream of, not to see.'

impressed Reginald with a mingled feeling of sur elbows of those whose fronts were out of view;

prise, of admiration, of reverence, and of pity. * * the ceaseless crash of mastication waked the endIt was now that there was no need for that pathetic The apartments of the Head of the Society less echoes of the vaulted space over-head; and apostrophe of another living sonneteer

presented a very different sort of appearance from airy arches around mimicked and magnified every Away all specious pliancy of mind those of the recluse and laborious senior fellow of gurgle of every sauce-bottle. The stateliness of In men of low degree !

*** Reginald was conducted, in short, into a the ceremonial, and the profoundness of the generFor it was now that the strong bargeman of Isis, very handsome house, furnished in every part in a al silence all about, gave to what was, after all, vf and the strong bachelor of Brazen-noze, rushed style of profuse modern luxury, such as perhaps more than a dinner, something of the dignity.ra. together · like two clouds with thunder laden,' and the edifice to which it belonged, or with the form nity of a sacrifice. A sort of reverend z did not quite accord either with the character of festival—I had almost said something of the

ight, that the old reproach of Baculo potius,' &c. was and structure of the different apartments themed to be gratified in the clearing of ever

young forever done away with. It was now that the

selves. proctor, even the portly proctor, showed that he had After waiting for a considerable time in a and the purple stream of a bumper desco

remarks sat at the feet of other Jacksons besides Cyril;- large and lofty room, where chinez curtains and the majesty of a libation. * Fore that came to preach, remained to play.'

Ottomans, elegant paper-hangings, and splendid "In the under-graduates' part of thok would

pier-glasses, contrasted strangely cnough with a feast was, of course, less magnificent; the subIn a word, there was an elegant tussle which last-great Gothic window; of the richest monastic them the use of wine is altogether pro it, may ed for five minutes, opposite to the side porch of painted glass, a roof of solid stone, carved all over distinction, on this occasion sufficient, All-Souls. There the townsmen gave way; but with flowers, mitres, shields of arms, and heads of considering how incessantly they were

"ledge of being pursued with horrible oaths and blows as far martyrs, and a fire-place, whose form and dimen- the manciple bearing decanters to the su

nactical as Carfas, they rallied again under the shadow of sions spoke it at least three centuries old—they gion. But the dinner itself w. is seen between that sacred edifice, and received there a welcome were at last admitted into the presence of the pro- than the fellows rose from thand a knowledge ctul fereinforcement from the purlieus of the Staffordshire vost. He received them in his library-what a Latin thanksgiving having relations which eatesman canal, and the ingenuous youth of Penny-farthing different kind of library from that which Reginald scended in solemn progu street. Once more the tide of war was turned, had just left! New and finely bound books, arrang- place, and followed i

our own. We by an act of the gowned phalanx gave back-surly and slow, ed in magnificent cases of glass and mahogany who, strutting like against

this ignor, a fortunate indeed, but still they did give back. Ŭn rolled the the Courier, a number of the Quarterly, and a nov. shalled the line puld show them, iced a public adverse and swelling tide with their few plael of Miss Edgeworth, reposing on a rose-wood Thither no nori, that' this sciences to fifty milinstincts and their few plain rules.' At every co. table covered with a small Persian carpet--some of learned phalarıted to effect importe-three or four Jege gate sounded, as the retreating band passed its Bunbury's caricatures, coloured and in gilt frames catch the echo venerable precincts, the loud, the shirilly summons

he people, di-a massive silver standish, without a drop of ink “The mom of— Gown! Gown!'- while down each murkly npon its brilliant surface-deep soft chairs in red reach of ear-s

not open too wide a the appropriaplebeian alley, the snoring mechanic doffed his morocco-a parrot cage by the window and a lif publicans p not to show how

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study of Astronomy involves of the most more pretension, have given the world power, which constitute a poet, would be useiul principles in Natural Philosophy ; abundant proof, that political and economic impatient of deformity. He could not sufbut every one at all acquainted with the wisdom came across the waters with our fer a false and gaudy glitter to mingle its science, has remarked upon its tendency to fathers and are no way stinted in their ray with purer light, nor be satisfied, while elevate and ennoble the mind. What does growth in this new soil; but how many beautiful conceptions were clothed with this mean? That it fills the imagination books have we, which exhibit, like every inadequate and clumsy expressions. He with sublime and exalted views of Him, page of Mr Bryant's poetry, an union of must, by the very condition of his poetical who built and rules these countless worlds? fine taste well taught and disciplined, with existence, do as Mr Bryant has done ; This it surely does, but it stops not here; an imagination, prompt, original and splend- labour on that, which he has written; its tendency to purify the heart, by correct- id, and resolute, patient labour ?

scrutinize and meditate upon, not only his ing our seltishness, is no less to be valued Mr Bryant does not seem to be wanting thoughts but the forms they assume, until than its power of enlarging the understand- in ambition, or in the disposition to attempt it would not be easy to improve a single ing. In our early years we regard this lit- arduous things; but he sustains himself at page, by striking out one idea or changing tle globe as the greatest and most import- his loftiest height with so strong a wing, one expression. ant in the universe, and consider the sun we cannot but think he might have gone Most of the pieces are very short, and all and moon and stars as merely its servants. higher. We hope he is not lazy; we hope are upon subjects sufficiently trite; yet there Just so, we regard ourselves as the centre he is willing to do what no American has is very little of commonplace in any of them. of living beings, and consider all others as done; what no one but himself has given This is a striking characteristic of Mr more or less useful and important in the presumptive proof, that he can do. We Bryant's poetry, and seems to arise, not system of life, as they promote our objects trust he will attempt, with earnestness and from a determination to be eccentric, when and are subservient to our wills. Some- determination, to make one poem, long he can be nothing better, but because his thing of this utter self-conceit necessarily enough to task all his powers, and good mind has its own character, and will imleaves us as we advance in life, and more enough to reward his severest toil. Parts of press it upon all its works. He is a good of it becomes concealed, even from our this volume are truly admirable, and have thinker, and never uses fine words to selves; but much, far too much remains. already won for their author an exalted adorn or conceal thoughts, which have no

There are, however, few men and certainly and extended reputation; but he must intrinsic value or beauty. no children, whose selfishness is so obdu- know, that it is regarded as a promise In this country there is no lack of poetrate as not to yield in some degree to the rather than a performance; as indicating ; ical talent or of poetical aspirants; and it influence of a science, which at once car- rather the possession of extraordinary pow- grieves us to see the powers that ar ries their thoughts away from themselves ers, than their exertion. Though the Eng-wasted in imitation of Goldsmith, of Scott, and the narrow world about them, and lish critics say of him, that their poets must of Byron, and, worst of all, of Moore. This places them in other centres and surrounds look to their laurels now that such a com- will not do; a mere imitator cannot be a them with other spheres, and discloses to petitor has entered the lists, yet let him poet; indeed, so much had we been sick. them a universe expanding into infinity, and remember, that a few jousts in the ring, ened by the “crambe recocta” of most of shows them how assuming and profane is never established the reputation of a knight. our versifiers

, that we had begun to despair that self-love, which says, “ I, and none If he adds not to the talents he has already of seeing an original poet formed on this else beside me.”

exhibited, a capacity for more sustained side of the Atlantic ; our pleasure was Another moral use to be derived from and persevering effort, than so small a equalled by our surprise, when we took up this study results from the fact, that some work-elaborate as it is,-could require, Bryant's poems, listened to the uncommon sort of analogy between the material and he may make more odes and songs, beau- melody of the versification, wondered at the spiritual heavens is perceived by every per- tiful as such things well can be, but will writer's perfect command of language, and son, and is recognised in the Sacred Scrip- never build up a lasting monument of found that they were American poems. tures, and in the languages of all nations. mighty power, strenuously, resolutely, and we were not pleased with all alike, for the This analogy is naturally and almost neces- successfully put forth.

construction of some lines in “The Ages," sarily kept in view, while surveying the We are very far from complaining, that and in “Thanatopsis” reminded us rather marks of wisdom and beneficence, dis- the poetry now published by Mr Bryant, is too strongly of the Lake School; but the played in the material heavens; and it is not sufficiently laboured; its defects, if any ode “To a Waterfowl,” is a beautiful and this which gives to the science that teaches it has, arise only from excessive fondness harmonious blending of various beauties into by this stupendous scaffolding,

for certain models or styles of poetry. Our one. We have been awed with the boldCreation's golden steps, to climb to Him,"

national fashion of doing every thing, is, to ness and sublimity of the metaphoric lana dignity which illustrates no other sci- despatch the matter in hand, rather rapidly guage of Wordsworth, have been soothed ence, and almost invests it with the sanc- than thoroughly. A young man, therefore, by the deep and quiet tone of moral sentitity and the influence of religion.

toiling with persevering care upon a few ment, which pervades many of the works pieces of poetry written in the intervals of of Southey, and delighted with the skilful

professional exertion, is quite a strange adaptation of epithets in the odes of ColPoems, by William Cullen Bryant. Cam- sight. The poetry in this volume, is strongly lins; but we do not remember any poem,

bridge, 1821. 12mo. 44 pages. marked with every characteristic which in which these high excellencies are more We are not afraid of praising Mr Bryant could be impressed upon it, by the most happily united, than in the short ode mentoo much, but of praising him injudiciously. watchful, laborious, and repeated revision. tioned above. We are in little danger of giving the pub- We may have readers, who will think this, “ The Ages" is the first and longest lic too exalted an opinion of his poetic nothing in its favour; but we differ from poem, and was delivered before the & B K powers and works; but we feel that there them altogether. No valuable result can Society, at Cambridge. It is in the Spen

is much in this little volume, which it is repay slight efforts, for every great serian stanza; the following extract may survive

vilicult to measure by any usual criterion, thing must “ be born of great endeav- serve as a specimen. seen ar! class with other works of kindred ours;"—and this is as true of poetry as of Lucius Junir. We have no hesitation in say- all other things.

“ Has Nature, in her calm majestic march, A fortunate accident

Faltered with age at last ? does the bright sun poet, whose po American, whose productions may throw into a poet's head, or upon his Grow dim in heaven? or, in their far blue arch, lected; but our knowledge, has written so paper, some bright thoughts or happy lines; Sparkle the crowd of stars, when day is done, and he is alntry as Mr Bryant; and we con- but it is not thus those things are written, Less brightly? when the dew-lipped Spring comes We shall ¡in our opinion, no volume can be over which time has no power.

Breathes she with airs less soft, or scents the sky examine som more honorable to the literature

Indeed, a true poet cannot be satisfied

With flowers less fair than when her reigo begun? acter and usestry than this thin duodecimo. with imperfection; that exquisite percep- Does prodigal Autumn, to our age, deny have prefixed prks of greater magnitude and tion of beauty, and the sensibility to its pe plenty that once swelled beneath his sobereye?

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