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SEC. 4. The words "inland waters" used in this Act shall not be held to include the Great Lakes and their connecting and tributary waters as far east as Montreal; and this act shall not in any respect modify or affect the provisions of the Act entitled "An Act to regulate navigation on the Great Lakes and their connecting and tributary waters," approved February eighth, eighteen hundred and ninety-five.

A copy of this circular will be posted in a conspicuous place in the custom-house, and you will please advise, so far as practicable, private persons concerned of the suspension of the proclamation already issued. EUGENE TYLER CHAMBERLAIN,

Approved:

C. S. HAMLIN, Acting Secretary.

(15656.)

Commissioner.

Entry of Goods Imported by a Firm which afterwards went into Liquidation-Written Indorsement of Firm on Withdrawal Entry Necessary.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 25, 1895.

SIR: The Department is in receipt of your letter of the 18th instant, in which you state that an importing corporation at your port having goods in warehouse have made an assignment to a trustee for the benefit of its creditors, and that such assignment is a matter of record, imparting full legal notice under the laws of Missouri; that you have permitted the trustees as such to pay duties on and withdraw a portion of the goods, signing entry as trustee for said corporation, and you inquire if such action is proper, and whether additional evidence should be furnished in such case.

In reply, I have to state that said corporation should transfer its rights to the trustee by written indorsement on the withdrawal entry, and this being done, the trustee would be thenceforth recognized as the principal in the transaction.

Respectfully, yours,
(8023 g.)

CHARLES S. HAMLIN,

SURVEYOR OF CUSTOMS, Kansas City, Mo.

(15657.)

Acting Secretary.

Denying Refund of Duty on Tobacco Stolen from Warehouse.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 26, 1895.

SIR: The Department is in receipt of your letter of the 18th instant, submitting the application of Messrs. Litchenstein Bros., dated the 5th instant, for the refund of $2,382.20 paid as duties on certain bales of tobacco. They state that they imported per P. Caland on June 30, 1893, 13 bales of tobacco, Nos. 1843-55, and on August 12, 1893, 132

bales per Maasdam, Nos. 1911-2033, all of which were duly entered in the custom-house under bond, and stand in the warehouse of Messrs. Jarvis & Co., Nos. 4 and 6, Jones Lane, in your city; that the proprietor of the warehouse informed them that the warehouse had been broken into sometime between December 31, 1893, and January 2, 1894, and bales Nos. 1848 and 1854 out of the 13 bales, and bales Nos. 1911, 1914, 1932, 1935, 1956, and 2031 out of the 123 bales had been stolen, and that soon after the robbery a demand was made upon them by you for the duties due on the missing bales, viz: $2,382.20 on the 7 bales and $688.23 on the 2 bales; and as they desired to dispose of the larger importation they were obliged to pay the duties on the 7 missing bales before they could obtain a delivery of the remainder of the importation. They call attention to article 686 of the customs regulations, and request that the amount may be refunded.

You report, under date of the 18th instant, that you compelled the importer to pay the duties in accordance with the conditions of their warehouse bond, as no reason seemed to exist requiring the Government to resort to the bond of the warehousemen in preference to the bond of the importers, and that if the warehousemen have been guilty of negligence they are undoubtedly responsible for any damage accruing to their bailees.

Your views in this matter appear to be in harmony with paragraph 686 of the regulations to which the applicants refer, as it provides that "the proprietor, and not the collector, is responsible for the safe-keeping of the goods stored in any bonded warehouse, the Government being concerned solely for the security of the revenue." The application is therefore necessarily denied.

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Cotton Wearing Apparel-" Fascinators," under Act of 1890.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 26, 1895.

SIR: I have to inform you that the Department is in receipt of a letter dated the 16th instant from the United States attorney for the southern district of New York, reporting the trial on the 5th instant of the appraisers' suit No. 789, H. Oppenheimer, involving the dutiable classification of goods called "fascinators" under the act of 1890, which suit resulted in a verdict in favor of the Government, and sustained the decisions of the collector and your Board.

It appears that said goods were assessed for duty under paragraph 351 of the act of October 1, 1890, as manufactures of "cotton chenille”

at the rate of 60 per cent ad valorem, the importer claiming that the same was dutiable under paragraph 349 of said act as "cotton wearing apparel" at the rate of 50 per cent ad valorem, and the decision of the court is, in effect, that the paragraph for manufactures of chenille is more specific than the general provision for cotton wearing apparel. CHARLES S. HAMLIN,

Respectfully, yours,
(8004 g.)

Acting Secretary.

The PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF GENERAL APPRAISERS,

125 Bleecker street, New York.

(15659.)

Classification of Cotton and India-Rubber Dress Shields under the Act of 1890.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 26, 1895.

SIR: The Department is in receipt of a communication from the United States attorney for the southern district of New York dated the 11th instant, in which he reports the trial of the so-called appraisers' case, W. H. Riley & Co. v. The United States (A. 489), in the United States circuit court for that district, which case was decided adversely to the Government.

The merchandise in this case consisted of certain so-called "dress shields," item No. 230, composed of cotton and india rubber, which were classified by you as "cotton and india rubber wearing apparel,' dutiable at the rate of 50 cents per pound and 50 per cent ad valorem under paragraph 349 of the tariff act of October 1, 1890.

The importers protested, claiming that this particular merchandise was dutiable at 30 per cent ad valorem under paragraph 460 of that act as a manufacture of which india rubber was the component material of chief value, which claim was overruled by the Board of General Appraisers.

An application for review was duly filed by the importers under the provisions of section 15 of the act of June 10, 1890, and has resulted in a reversal of the decision of the Board of General Appraisers in this case as to item 230, the court holding that the provisions of paragraph 349 relate only to clothing and wearing apparel of which cotton is the component material of chief value.

The Attorney-General having advised this Department, under date of the 21st instant, that no appeal will be directed in this case, you are hereby authorized to take the usual course for refunding the duties exacted in excess on the merchandise covered thereby.

Respectfully, yours,
(7975 g.)

COLLECTOR OF CUSTOMS, New York.

CHARLES S. HAMLIN,

Acting Secretary.

(15660.)

Quarantine of Cattle Imported into the United States.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 26, 1895. SIR: I inclose herewith for your information and guidance a copy of the regulations issued by the Department of Agriculture on the 7th instant for the inspection and quarantine of neat cattle, sheep, and other ruminants, and swine imported into the United States, which meet the approval of this Department.

The Secretary of Agriculture, in transmitting copies of these regulations, states that they supersede all former regulations issued by his Department, and that the cooperation of this Department is requested in the enforcement thereof. Live stock now in transit will be admitted into the United States under the former regulations. (See Synopses 10639, 10717, 11260, 11262, 11477, 11662, 11820, 12187, and 13717.) CHARLES S. HAMLIN,

Respectfully, yours,
(8031 g.)

COLLECTOR OF CUSTOMS, Buffalo, N. Y.

Acting Secretary.

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, Washington, D. C., February 7, 1895.

REGULATIONS FOR THE INSPECTION AND QUARANTINE OF NEAT CATTLE, SHEEP, AND OTHER RUMINANTS, AND SWINE IMPORTED INTO THE UNITED STATES.

In pursuance of sections 7, 8, and 10, of the act of Congress, entitled "An act providing for the inspection of meats for exportation, and prohibiting the importation of adulterated articles of food or drink, and authorizing the President to make proclamation in certain cases, and for other purposes," approved August 30, 1890, the following regulations are hereby prescribed for the inspection and quarantine of neat cattle, sheep, and other ruminants, and swine imported into the United States, and all previous regulations prescribed for such inspection and quarantine are hereby rescinded:

1. With the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, the followingnamed ports are hereby designated as quarantine stations, and all cattle, sheep, and other ruminants, and swine imported into the United States, must be entered through said ports, viz: On the Atlantic seaboard, the ports of Boston, New York, and Baltimore; on the Pacific seaboard, San Diego; along the boundary between the United States and Mexico, Nogales, El Paso, Eagle Pass, and Laredo; and along the border or boundary line between the United States and British Columbia and Canada, through the customs ports in the collection districts of Aroostook and Bangor, Me.; Vermont, Vt.; Buffalo Creek, Niagara, and Oswegatchie, N. Y.; Detroit and Huron, Mich.; Minnesota, Minn., and Puget Sound. Washington.

2. The word "animals," when used in these regulations, refers to and includes all or any of the following kinds: Neat cattle, sheep, and other

ruminants, and swine. The words "contagious diseases," when used in these regulations, includes and applies to all or any of the following diseases: Anthrax in cattle, sheep, goats, or swine; contagious pleuropneumonia in cattle; Texas or splenetic fever in cattle; tuberculosis in cattle; foot-and-mouth diseases in cattle, sheep, goats, and swine; rinderpest in cattle and sheep; sheep-pox, foot-rot, and scab in sheep; hog cholera, swine plague, and erysipelas in swine.

3. All cattle, sheep, and other ruminants imported into the United States from any part of the world shall be accompanied with a certificate from the local authority of the district in which said animals have been for one year next preceding the date of shipment, stating that no contagious pleuro-pneumonia, foot-and-mouth disease, or rinderpest has existed in said district for the past year. And all swine imported into the United States from any part of the world shall be accompanied with a similar certificate relating to the existence of foot-and-mouth disease, hog cholera, and erysipelas. All such animals shall also be accompanied with an affidavit by the owner from whom the importer has purchased them, stating that said animals have been in the district where purchased for one year next preceding the date of sale, and that none of the above-mentioned diseases have existed among them, nor among any animals of the kind with which they have come in contact, for one year last past, and that no inoculation has been practiced among said animals for the past two years. Also by an affidavit from the importer or his agent supervising the shipment, stating that they have not passed through any district infected with contagious diseases affecting said kind of animals; that they have not been exposed in any possible manner to the contagion of any of said contagious diseases, and that the animals, when not driven, have been shipped in clean and disinfected cars and vessels direct from the farm where purchased.

4. The foregoing certificate and affidavits must accompany said animals and be presented to the collector of customs at the port of entry, and by him be delivered to the inspector of the Bureau of Animal Industry stationed at said port, to allow them to be imported into the United States.

5. All neat cattle imported into the United States from any part of the world except Mexico, Central and South America, shall be subject to a quarantine of ninety days, counting from date of arrival at the quarantine station. All sheep and other ruminants, and swine, from any part of the world except North, Central, and South America, shall be subject to a quarantine of fifteen days, counting from date of arrival at the quarantine station.

6. Any person contemplating the importation of animals from any part of the world except North, Central, and South America, or of cattle from the Dominion of Canada, must first obtain from the Secretary of Agriculture two permits, one stating the number and kind of animals to be imported, the port and probable date of shipment, which will entitle them to clearance papers on presentation to the American consul at said port of shipment; the other, stating the port at which said animals are to be landed and quarantined, and the approximate date of their arrival, and this will assure the reception of the number and kind specified therein at the port and quarantine station named, at the date prescribed for their arrival, or at any time during three weeks immediately following, after which the permit will be void. These permits shall in no case be available at any port other than the one mentioned therein. Permits must be in the name of the owner of, or agent for, any one lot of animals. When more persons than one own a lot of

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