Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

when twenty-five good crops of wheat can be raised from the same land
except by rotation and skilful husbandry. The amazing heritage of
wealth in the rich soil must be hoarded. ...
Pork, corn, wheat, cotton, sugar, steel rails, reapers, wagons,

shelf hardware, and shingles will take care of themselves in the West. But will the Mississippi Valley take its place among the great intellectual communities of the world? ...

... if popular education, intelligence, and natural keenness make up civilization, the West is a highly civilized community; and there are many reasons for supposing that it has the conditions for a broader intellectual growth. First of all, it is freer than any other great area of the earth's surface from the trammels of an official religion ; several of the coast colonies had established churches, but not one community in the Mississippi Valley, except Louisiana.

the district schools in the West are probably as good as those in the remote parts of New England; and the great city systems are, upon the whole, superior to those of the East. ..

... When it comes to universities, the average provision in the llest is excellent, and most of the newer States have a general system of complete government education, for the State universities have direct relations with the public schools, and are superior in equipment and prestige to the denominational colleges.

The difficulty about intellectual life in the Mississippi Valley is not so much a lack of interest in the things of the mind as a lack of local traditions. . How can there be traditions in a city like Minneapolis, where not one adult in twenty was born in the place or perhaps in the State? The North and Northwest are now undergoing a tremendous social change through the renting of great farms to new-comers, while the owners live in villages or towns. This means that the children will not know “ the old place," and the grandchildren will have not so much as a myth of the old oaken bucket. Even in old cities like Albany and Baltimore it is hard to build up a civic sentiment a sense of gratitude to ancestors and responsibility to posterity. Perhaps as population becomes more stable this feeling will grow up in the West, but it is hard to realize the effect upon a community of such rapid changes of life that not one child in twenty will live in the house of his grandfather.

Of the continued material wealth of the Mississippi Valley there is no reason to doubt, and a political structure designed for smalí agricultural communities has somehow proved at least moderately successful for large States containing great cities. But for ages to come the principal output and wealth of the Mississippi Valley must be agricultural; and the greatest danger is a separation of interest between the tiller of the soil (allied, perhaps, with the workman at the forge) on the one side, and the capitalist and the professional and business man on the other side. At present the social forces are well balanced, and immigration has not brought the great dangers usually ascribed to it; but if the farms are to fall into the hands of a rent-paying peasantry, and the owners are not to live in the midst of that peasantry and to share their interests, as do the land-owners in European countries, then the Mississippi Valley may yet see social contests which will make the French Revolution seem mild. The two bases of the present happiness and prosperity of that great region are — first, the intelligence, honesty, and orderliness of the average man, and secondly, the belief that the farmer and the wage-earner get a fair share of the output. Albert Bushnell Hart, The Future of the Mississippi l'alley, in Harper's

New Monthly Magazine, February, 1900 (New York, etc.), C, 418-424 passim.

GENERAL INDEX

TO THE FOUR VOLUMES

(The names of the authors of extracts are in Boldface. The titles of the pieces are in

SMALL CAPITALS. The titles of books cited are in Italics.]

ABERDEEN, LORD, on slavery in Texas,

iii, 650.
Abolitionists, arguments of a New Eng.

lander, ii, 293-297; arguments of a
Quaker, 302-308; Garrison's principles,
iii, 595-597; anti-slavery meeting, 602-
608; political, 608-612; denounced, 619-
622, iv, 160-161, 194; Calhoun on, iv, 48-
51; Webster on, 53-54; on Webster,
55-56; on the Civil War, 306-309, 395-

397. - See also Anti-slavery, Slavery.
Acadians, deportation of, ii, 360-365.
Adair, James, value of personal experi-

ence, ii, 3; THE LIFE OF AN INDIAN
TRADER, 326-330; History of the Ameri.

can Indians, 330.
Adams, Abigail, Letters, ii, 20, 554, iii, 333;

A WOMAN AT THE FRONT, ii, 550-554 ;

THE NATIONAL CAPITAL, iii, 331-333.
Adams, Amos, Planting of New England,

A SELECTMAN, 220–223; THE FIRST
CONTINENTAL CONGRESS, 434-439; life
in Philadelphia, 437-439; DIFFICULTIES
IN FRAMING ARTICLES OF CONFEDER-
ATION, 539-543; EXPLANATION OF THE
PEACE OF 1782, 623-625; negotiations
with Holland, ii, 162; PRESENTATION
OF THE FIRST AMERICAN MINISTER
TO GEORGE THIRD), 172-176; president
of the Senate, 258; ORIGIN OF PARTIES,
282-283; ELECTION OF 1796. 300-301 ;

Anti-Federalist comment on, 337.
Adams, John Quincy, Memoirs, iii, 10, 429.

483; DISCUSSION OF PEACE, 426-429;
THE SPANISH TREATY OF 1819, 481-
483 ; l'Amistad case, 626, 629; DEFENCE

OF FREE SPEECH, 633-636.
Adams, Nehemiah, A NORTHERN APOI ()-

GIST, iv, 65-68; South-Side View of Slav-

ery, 68,

ii, 15.

Adams, Charles Francis, Familiar Letters

of John Adams and his Wife, ii, 20, 64;
Letters of Mrs. Adams, 554, iii, 333;

Geneva arbitration, iv, 556.
Adams, C. F. Jr., Richard Henry Dana, iv,

91.
Adams, Charles Kendall, Manual of His-

torical Literature, i, 26, ii, 32.
Adams, Henry, Life of Gallatin, iii, 12.
Adams, John, value of journal, ii, 2;

Let-
ters, 20, 64; Works, 20, 223, 378, 439, 543.
625. iii, 10, II, 163, 176, 283, 301; OVER-
WEENING PREJUDICE IN FAVOR OF NEW
ENGLAND, ii, 63-64; THE DIGNITY OF

Adams, Samuel, WHAT IS POPULAR
GOVERNMENT ? ii, 93-96; OBSERVA-
TIONS ON THE TREATY OF PEACE, 161-

163.
Adams, William, British envoy, iii, 426-429.
Admiralty, court of, in the colonies, ii, 396-

397.— See also Smuggling.
Advertisements, for runawavs, ii, 298-302.
Agents, colonial, in England, ii, 184-187.
“Agreement," of Massachusetts, 1629, 1, 371.
Agriculture, and protective tariff, iii, 434-

436; for negroes, iv, 664; dangers, 668-669.
Alabama, AN ORDINANCE OF SECESSION,

iv, 188-189; Democrats regain control in,
501-504.

[ocr errors]

Alabama, Confederate cruiser, combat with

the Kearsarge, iv, 416-418; Geneva award

on depredations of, 552-553.
Alamo, the, in Mexico, iii, 638.
Alaska, ukase on the waters of, iii, 487-489;

Sumner on, iv, 547-550 ; Bering Sea arbi-

tration, 564-567.
Albany, town of, 1, 542; RECORDS OF A City

GOVERNMENT, ii, 208-211; clearing of
streets, 208; keeping of Sabbath, 208;
constables, 208–209; taxes, 209-210; min-
ister's salary, 210; selling of liquor, 210;
care of chimneys and fire-places, 211;
center for Indian trade, 322-324; Plan of

Union formed at, 357-360.
Albany Evening Journal, iv, 195.
Aleutian Islands, iii, 488.
Alexander I, Czar, THE RUSSIAN UKASE

ON ALASKAN WATERS, ii, 487-489.
Alexander VI, Pope, PAPAL BULL DIVID-

ING THE NEW WORLD, 1, 2, 24, 40-43.
Algiers, demand for subsidies, iii, 351-355.
Allbright, Jacob, BURR'S MUSTER AT

BLENNERHASSET ISLAND, 111, 356-359.
Allen, Ethan, sent to England, ii, 529-530.
Alliance. - See Treaty.
Allibone, S. Austin, Critical Dictionary, i,

24, ii, 30.
Allied Sovereigns, THE HOLY ALLIANCE,

wi, 479-480.
Almanac, Poor Richard's, extract, ii, 263-

266, title-page, 264; Ames's, 266-272.
Almon, John, Collection of Papers, ii, II;

Remembrancer, II, 451; Anecdotes of the

Life of Pitt, 19, 407.
Alsop, George, Province of Maryland, i, 14,

271; A CHARACTER OF THE PROVINCE

OF MARY-LAND, 267-271.
Amadas, Philip, voyage to Virginia, i, 89.
Amazons, in South America, i, 97.
Amendments. - See Constitution.
America, discovered, i, 35; first use of the

name, 49; Cabot's voyage, 70-72; first
printed account in English, 72; archives
on, in Europe, ii, 10; pride, 411; distin-
guishing characteristic, 423; Lafayette's
opinion, 485-488; reconciliation or inde-
pendence ? 530-534; foundation of state
constitutions, 534-537; character of Con-
gress, 543-545; during the Revolution.
560-562; Steuben's opinion, 584-585; 1

financial state in 1781, 594-603; people
discontented, 597; Articles of Confedera-
tion, 604; bank, 605; attitude of George
Ill toward, 619-620; peace with England,
623-625; results of the Revolution, 629-
632; conditions in 1784. iii, 22-27. -
See also Civil War, Colonies, Congress,
Revolution, United States, and Tables of

Contents.
American Annual Cyclopædia, iv, 6.
American Antiquarian Society, library, 1, 8,

ii, 10; Proceedings, i, 178.
American Anti-Slavery Society, iii, 608.
American Historical Association, Annual

Report, ii, ii, 23, iv, 1; favors study of
sources, ii, 26; Report on History is

Schools, ii, 1, iv, I.
American Historical Review, ii, 32, 530, 582,

iii, 52, 211, 276, 336, 351.
American History Leaflets, i, 5, 14, 11, 5, 12,

20, iii, 8, iv, 6.
American Museum, ii, 37, 239.
American Philosophical Society, Transac-

tions, iii, 471.
American State Papers, iii, 10; Foreign Re-

lations, 171, 312, 314, 326, 355, 400, 403,

501.
American War Ballads and Lyrics, iv, 263.
Americans, characteristics of, iii, 77.
Ames, Fisher, DEFENCE OF THE JAY

TREATY, 11, 315-319; Speech on the Jay

Treaty, 319.
Ames, Nathaniel, A YEAR OF A COLLEGE

STUDENT'S LIFE, ii, 266-272; Duary, 272,
iji, 339; POLITICAL COMMENTS, 111, 339-

339.
Amistad case, iii, 626-629.
Anburey, Thomas, Travels, ii, 18, 20.
Anderson, Robert, BREAKING OF THE

STORM, iv, 213-216; SURRENDER OF

FORT SUMTER, 220.
Andover (Mass.), life at, iii, 509-512.
André, John, THE EXPERIENCES OF A

BRITISH SPY, ii, 515-518,
Andrews, John, THE BOSTON TEA-PARTY,

ii, 431-433; Letters, 433.
Andros, Sir Edmund, revolution against, i,

463-466; diligence, ji, 91-92. - See also

Connecticut, Massachusetts.
Annals of Congress, i, 8, 9, 264, 272, 376.

380, 420, 436, 440. — See also Congres-

[ocr errors][ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »