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OFFICIAL RECORDS OF THE UNITED STATES

17 vols.

1790-1854. B. R. Curtis, Reports of Decisions in the Supreme Court of the

United States ; with Notes and a Digest. 22 vols. Boston, 1881. — Con

densed reports. 1855-1862. Samuel F. Miller, Reports of Decisions in the Supreme Court of

the United States. 4 vols. Washington, 1874–1875. — Condensed reports,

in continuation of Curtis. 1863-1874. John William Wallace, Cases Argued and Adjudged. 23 vols.

Washington, 1870-1876. 1875-1882. William T. Otto, Cases Argued and Adjudged.

Boston, 1876-1883. — Also bears the title, United States Reports, Supreme

Court, Vols. 91-1071882–1899. J. C. Bancroft Davis, United States Reports. Vols. 108-178.

71 vols. New York, etc., 1884-1900. 1791-1897. Official Opinions of the Attorneys-General of the United States.

21 vols. Washington, 1852-1898. 1833-1873. United States, Congressional Globe : containing Sketches of the

Debates and Proceedings. 109 vols. Washington, 1835-1873. — Contains

the debates from 1833 on. 1789-1900. United States, Statutes at Large. 31 vols. Boston, etc., 1850– 1900.

The official text of statutes from 1789 to 1900. 1789-1897. United States, A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of

the Presidents. 10 vols. Washington, 1896-1899. A valuable official publication, poorly edited by James D. Richardson, containing all the presidents' messages and proclamations except nominations for office.

Sold by the government at cost. 1873-1900. United States, Congressional Record. 34 vols. Washington,

1873-1901. - Official reports of debates.

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In comparison with earlier times, the period after 1845 is very deficient in materials of this kind, except during the Civil War. [Thomas Hart Benton], Thirty Years' View ; or, A History of the Working

of the American Government for Thirty Years, from 1820 to 1850. 2 vols.

New York, etc., 1854-1856.
James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress (1861-1881). 2 vols. Norwich,

Conn., 1884–1886.

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(James Buchanan], Mr. Buchanan's Administration on the Eve of the

Rebellion. New York, 1866.
F[rancis] B[icknell] Carpenter, Sir Months at the Ilhite House with

Abraham Lincoln. New York, 1866.
L[ucius) E[ugene] Chittenden, Personal Reminiscences, 1840-1890, including

some not hitherto published of Lincoln and the War. New York, 1893.
James Freeman Clarke, Anti-Slavery Days. New York, 1884.
Reuben Davis, Recollections of Mississippi and Mississippians. Boston,

etc., 1891.
V [lysses] S. Grant, Personal Memoirs.

2 vols.

New York, 1885-1886.
Horace Greeley, Recollections of a Busy Life. New York, etc., 1868.
Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations during the Late War

between the States. New York, 1874.
George W. Julian, Political Recollections, 1840 to 1872. Chicago, 1884.
James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattor; Memoirs of the Civil

War in America. Philadelphia, 1896.
A. K. McClure, Abraham Lincoln and Men of War Times. Philadelphia,

1892.
Hugh McCulloch, Men and Measures of Half a Century ; Sketches and Com-

ments, New York, 1888. Samuel J [oseph] May, Some Recollections of our Antislavery Conflict. Boston,

1869. Frederick Law Olmsted, The Cotton Kingdom. 2 vols. New York, etc., 1861. William Howard Russell, My Diary North and South [1861]. 2 vols.

London, 1863 William H. Seward, Autobiography, from 1801 to 1834, with a Memoir of his

Life. (Edited by F. W. Seward.) New York, 1877. P[hilip] H. Sheridan, Personal Memoirs. 2 vols. New York, 1888. John Sherman, Recollections of Forty Years in the House, Senate, and Cabinet.

2 vols. Chicago, etc., 1895. William Tecumseh] Sherman, Memoirs. By himself. 2 vols. New York,

1875. John Sherman and William Tecumseh Sherman, Letters. (Edited by

Rachel Sherman Thorndike.) New York, 1894. Alexander H. Stephens, A Constitutional View of the Late War between the

States. 2 vols. Philadelphia, etc. [1868-1870). Thurlow Weed, Autobiography. (Edited by Harriet A. Weed.) Boston,

etc., 1884.

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TRAVELS

Books of foreign travels are not so numerous or important as earlier in our history. A long list will be found in Channing and Hart's Guide, $ 24. The following are of special importance : Isabella Bird, The Englishwoman in America. London, 1856. Paul Bourget, Outre-Mer ; Impressions of America [1893-1894). New York,

1895 Fredrika Bremer, The Homes of the New World ; Impressions of America

[1849-1851). (Translated by Mary Howitt.) 2 vols. New York, 1853. William Chambers, Things as they are in America (1853). London, etc., 1854. Emily Faithfull, Three Visits to America (1872, 1882, 1884). Edinburgh,

1884.
George A. McCall, Letters from the Frontier. Written during a Period of

Thirty Years' Service in the United States Army. Philadelphia, 1868.
Anthony Trollope, North America (1861–1862]. New York, 1862.
Charles Dudley Warner, Studies in the South and Il'est, with Comments on

Canada. New York, 1889.

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WORKS OF STATESMEN

George S. Boutwell, Speeches and Papers relating to the Rebellion and the

Overthrow of Slavery. Boston, 1867.
Rufus Choate, Works. (Edited by S. G. Brown.) 2 vols. Boston, 1862.
George William Curtis, Orations and Addresses. (Edited by C. E. Norton.)

3 vols. New York, 1894.
John A. Dix, Speeches and Occasional Addresses. 2 vols. New York, 1864.
Joshua R. Giddings, Speeches in Congress. Boston, etc., 1853.
Abraham Lincoln, Complete Works. (Edited by John G. Nicolay and John

Hay.) 2 vols. New York, 1894.
William H. Seward, Works. (Edited by G. E. Baker.) 5 vols. New York,

etc., 1853–1884.
Charles Sumner, Works. 15 vols. Boston, 1875-1883.
Samuel J. Tilden, Writings and Speeches. (Edited by John Bigelow.) 2

vols. New York, 1885.

Sources

TRAVELS

PART II

EXPANSION AND SLAVERY

ks of foreign travels are not so numerous or important as earlier
history. A long list will be found in Channing and Hart's Guide

,
The following are of special importance :-
Ula Bird, The Englishwoman in America. London, 1856.
Bourget, Outre-ller ; Impressions of America (1893-1894). New York,

CHAPTER II - THE MEXICAN WAR

95.

rika Bremer, The Homes of the New World; Impressions of America 1849-1851). (Translated by Mary Howitt.) 2 vols. New York, 1853. Tiam Chambers, Things as they are in America (1853). London, etc., 1854 ily Faithfull, Three Visits to America (1872, 1882, 1884). Edinburgh, 884. orge A. McCall

, Letters from the Frontier. Written during a period of Thirty Years' Service in the United States Army. Philadelphia, 1868. thony Trollope, North America (1861-1862]. New York, 1862. irles Dudley Warner, Studies in the South and West, with Comments on Canada. New York, 1889.

WORKS OF STATESMEN

7. On the Coast of California (1835)

BY RICHARD HENRY DANA (1840) Dana, who afterward became prominent as a lawyer and as a writer on international law, sought to restore his health during his college days by taking a sea voyage as a common sailor. Most of the two years thus spent was employed in sailing up and down the coast of California. The book in which he describes the routine and incidents of this experience acquired great popularity as a vivid and truthful narrative of the life of the common sailor, and is one of the few accounts of Mexican California. -- For Dana, see C. F. Adams, Richard Henry Dana. -- Bibliography: H. H. Bancroft, History of the Pacific States, XV, chs. xi-xiv passim. "HE bay of Monterey is very wide at the entrance, being about

twenty-four miles between the two points, Año Nuevo at the north, and Pinos at the south, but narrows gradually as you approach the town. . . . We came to anchor within two cable lengths of the shore, and the town lay directly before us, making a very pretty appearance ; its houses being plastered, which gives a much better effect than those of Santa Barbara, which are of a mud-color. The red tiles, too, on the roofs, contrasted well with the white plastered sides, and with the extreme greenness of the lawn upon which the houses — about an hundred in number -- were dotted about, here and there, irregularly..

The next day we were “turned-to" early, and began taking off the hatches, overhauling the cargo, and getting everything ready for on board, and began overhauling the cargo, manifest, &c. The Mexican revenue laws are very strict, and require the whole cargo to be landed,

examined, and taken on board again ; but our agent, Mr. R—, had liam H. Seward, Works. (Edited by G. E. Baker.) 5 vols. New York, inspection. At eight, the officers of the customs, five in number, came

Writings and Speeches. (Edited by John Bigelow.)' succeeded in compounding with them for the two last vessels, and saving

orge S. Boutwell

, Speeches and Papers relating to the Rebellion and the verthrow of Slavery. Boston, 1867. us Choate, Works. (Edited by S. G. Brown.) 2 vols. Boston, 1862. orge William Curtis, Orations and Addresses. (Edited by C. E. Norton.) ; vols. New York, 1894. n A. Dix, Speeches and Occasional Addresses. 2 vols. New York, 1864 hua R. Giddings, Speeches in Congress. Boston, etc., 1853. aham Lincoln, Complete Works. (Edited by John G. Nicolay and Joha day.) 2 vols. New York, 1894.

II

tc., 1853-1884. irles Sumner, Works. 15 vols. Boston, 1875-1883.

This

the trouble of taking the cargo ashore. The officers were dressed in the costume which we found prevailed through the country. A broadbrimmed hat, usually of a black or dark-brown color, with a gilt or figured band round the crown, and lined inside with silk; a short jacket of silk or figured calico, (the European skirted body-coat is never worn ;) the shirt open in the neck; rich waistcoat, if any; pantaloons wide, straight, and long, usually of velvet, velveteen, or broadcloth ; or else short breeches and white stockings. They wear the deer-skin shoe, which is of a dark brown color, and, (being made by Indians,) usually a good deal ornamented. They have no suspenders, but always wear a sash round the waist, which is generally red, and varying in quality with the means of the wearer. Add to this the never-failing cloak, and you have the dress of the Californian. This last garment, the cloak, is always a mark of the rank and wealth of the owner. The “gente de razón," or aristocracy, wear cloaks of black or dark blue broadcloth, with as much velvet and trimmings as may be ; and from this they go down to the blanket of the Indian ; the middle classes wearing something like a large table-cloth, with a hole in the middle for the head to go through. is often as coarse as a blanket, but being beautifully woven with various colors, is quite showy at a distance. Among the Spaniards there is no working class ; (the Indians being slaves and doing all the hard work ;) and every rich man looks like a grandee, and every poor scamp like a broken-down gentleman. I have often seen a man with a fine figure, and courteous manners, dressed in broadcloth and velvet, with noble horse completely covered with trappings; without a real in his pockets, and absolutely suffering for something to eat. ..

The Californians are an idle, thriftless people, and can make nothing for themselves. The country abounds in grapes, yet they buy bad wine made in Boston and brought round by us, at an immense price, and retail it among themselves at a real (12} cents) by the small wine-glass. Their hides too, which they value at two dollars in money, they give for something which costs seventy-five cents in Boston; and buy shoes (as like as not, made of their own hides, which have been carried twice round Cape Horn) at three and four dollars, and “chicken-skin " boots at fifteen dollars apiece. Things sell, on an average, at an advance of nearly three hundred per cent upon the Boston prices. This is partly owing to the heavy duties which the government, in their wisdom, with the intent, no doubt, of keeping the silver in the country, has laid upon imports. These duties, and the enormous expenses of so long a voyage,

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