History of the Conquest of Peru

Portada
Cosimo, Inc., 2007 M11 1 - 556 páginas
First published in 1847, The History of the Conquest of Peru was a companion piece to The History of the Conquest of Mexico. Readers will follow along with famous explorers like Francisco Pizarro and Pedro de la Gasca as they wage war against the native tribes and establish cities that have lasted to this day. In order to orient the reader, Prescott begins with a description of the Incas and their society. The main action of the invasion proceeds quickly, and the natives are easily overtaken. But unlike the conquest of Mexico, which ended in a valiant struggle for the capital, the conquest of Peru became a series of battles between the victorious Spaniards themselves. Peru could not rightly be said to be conquered until the Spanish crown put an end to the internal bickering. Students of history will enjoy this extensive account of the history of Peru. American historian, writer, and scholar WILLIAM HICKLING PRESCOTT (1796-1859) was a regular contributor to the prestigious Boston literary journal North American Review. Among his many books are 1837's The History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella the Catholic, a critical and popular success in both America and Europe.
 

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Página 58 - It consisted of a principal building and several chapels and inferior edifices, covering a large extent of ground in the heart of the city, and completely encompassed by a wall, which, with the edifices, was all constructed of stone. The work...
Página 60 - All the plate, the ornaments, the utensils of every description, appropriated to the uses of religion, were of gold or silver. Twelve immense vases of the latter metal stood on the floor of the great saloon, filled with grain of the Indian corn: the censers for the perfumes, the ewers which held the water for sacrifice, the pipes which conducted it through subterraneous channels into the buildings, the...
Página 59 - Gold, in the figurative language of the people, was "the tears wept by the sun," and every part of the interior of the temple glowed with burnished plates and studs of the precious metal. The cornices which surrounded the walls of the sanctuary were of the same costly material ; and a broad belt or frieze of gold, let into the stonework, encompassed the whole exterior of the edifice.
Página 42 - ... while the motion given to it by the passenger occasioned an oscillation still more frightful, as his eye wandered over the dark abyss of waters that foamed and tumbled many a fathom beneath. Yet these light and fragile fabrics were crossed without fear by the Peruvians, and are still retained by the Spaniards over those streams which, from the depth or impetuosity of the current, would seem impracticable for the usual modes of conveyance. The wider and more tranquil waters were crossed on balsas...

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