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Part of said sand dollars, the commencement of which is this day. But so much payment to be of the said eleven thousand dollars, as the said Cherokees may agree to agriculture, &c. accept in useful articles of, and machines for, agriculture and manufac

tures, shall be paid in those articles, at their option. Citizens of

Art. IV. The citizens of the United States shall have the free and U.S. to have unmolested use and enjoyment of the two following described roads, the use of cer in addition to those which are at present established through their tain described roads.

country; one to proceed from some convenient place near the head of Stone's river, and fall into the Georgia road at a suitable place towards the southern frontier of the Cherokees. The other to proceed from the neighbourhood of Franklin, on Big Harpath, and crossing the Tennessee at or near the Muscle Shoals, to pursue the nearest and best way to the settlements on the Tombigbee. These roads shall be viewed and marked out by men appointed on each side for that purpose, in order that they may be directed the nearest and best ways, and the time of

doing the business the Cherokees shall be duly notified. Treaty, when Art. V. This treaty shall take effect and be obligatory on the conto take effect. tracting parties, as soon as it is ratified by the President of the United

States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the same.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, the said commissioners, and the under-

signed chiefs and head men of the Cherokees have hereto set
their hands and seals. Done at Tellico the twenty-fifth day of

October, one thousand eight hundred and five.
A reserve being made in the margin of the first column, to Dick
Fields, for his improvement, and two interlineations being first made.

RETURN J. MEIGS,
DANL. SMITH.

Fox, or Em, no, lee,

John Jolly, or Eu, la, ta, kee,
Path-Kille or Ne, no, hut, ta, he,

Bark, or Eul, loo, ka,
Glass, or Tau, qua, tee, hee,

John McLemore, or John Eu, skee lacau
Double Head, or Chuqualutauge, Big Bear, or Yo, nahaqua,
Dick Justice,

Dreadfullwater, or Au, man, do, skaw, su,
Tounhull, or Too, nay, eh,

tee,
Turtle at Home, or Sul, li, coo, ahwa, la, Chal, lau, git, ti, hee,
Che, na, wee,

Calliliskee or Knife Sheat,
Slave Boy, or Oo, sau, na, bee,

Clo, se, nee,
Tal, lo ti, skee,

Challow, or Kingfisher,
Broom, or Cun, na, wee, so, skee,

John Watts, jun.
John Greenwood, or Sour Mush,

Sharp Arrow, or Co, star, auh,
Chu, li, o, ah,

John Dougherty, or Long John,
Kati, gi, skee,

Tuc, ka, see, or Tarreppin,
William Shawry, or Eskaculi, skee, Tu, ske, git, tihee, or Long Fellow,
Too, cha, lar,

Tochuwor, or Red Bird,
James Davis, or Coo, wu sa, li, skee, Ka, ti, hee, or Badgerson.

WITNESSES :-Robert Purdy, Secretary to the Commissioner. W. Yates, Lieu-
tenant Artillerists. Wm. L. Lovely, Assistant Agent. Nicholas Byers, United States'
Factor. Geo. W. Campbell. Will. Polk. James Blair. Jno. Smith, jun. Thomas
N. Clark. Chs. Hicks, Interpreter.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Between the United States of America, by their commissioners, Re- Oct. 27, 1805. turn J. Meigs and Daniel Smith, who are appointed to hold con

Proclamation, ferences with the Cherokees for the purpose of arranging certain June 10, 1806. interesting matters with the said Indians, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and head men of the Cherokees, of the

other part.

Art. 1st. Whereas it has been represented by the one party to the

Cession of cer. other, that the section of land on which the garrison of South West tain land to the Point stands, and which extends to Kingston, is likely to be a desirable place for the assembly of the state of Tennessee to convene at (a committee from that body now in session having viewed the situation) now the Cherokees being possessed of a spirit of conciliation, and seeing that this tract is desired for public purposes, and not for individual advantages, (reserving the ferries to themselves,) quit claim and cede to the United States the said section of land, understanding at the same time, that the buildings erected by the public are to belong to the public, as well as the occupation of the same, during the pleasure of the government; we also cede to the United States the first island in the Tennessee, above the mouth of Clinch.

Art. 2d. And whereas the mail of the United States is ordered to be Cherokees carried from Knoxville to New-Orleans, through the Cherokee, Creek grant the free and Choctaw countries; the Cherokees agree that the citizens of the through their United States shall have, so far as it goes through their country, the country for the free and unmolested use of a road leading from Tellico to Tombigbe, carriage of the to be laid out by viewers appointed on both sides, who shall direct it the nearest and best way; and the time of doing the business the Cherokees shall be notified of.

Art. 3d. In consideration of the above cession and relinquishment, Payment to the United States agree to pay to the said Cherokee Indians sixteen Cherokees. hundred dollars in money, or useful merchandize at their option, within ninety days after the ratification of this treaty.

Art. 4th. This treaty shall be obligatory between the contracting Treaty, when parties as soon as it is ratified by the President, by and with the advice to take effect. and consent of the Senate of the United States.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, the said commissioners, and the undersigned

chiefs and head men of the Cherokees have hereto set their hands
and seals.

Done at Te lico, this twenty-seventh day of October, in the year of

our Lord one thousand eight hundred and five.

RETURN J. MEIGS,
DANL. SMITH.

Black Fox, or Eunone,

Broom, or Can, nar, we, so, ske,
The Glass, or Tuu, qua, ti, hee,

Bald Hunter, or Too, wa, yul, lan,
Kutiyeskee,

John McLemore, or Eu squal looka,
Toochalar,

Closenie, or Creeping,
Turtle at Home, or Sullicoo, kie, walar, Double Head, or Chu, qua, cuttague,
Dick Justice,

Chickasaw-tihee, or Chickasaw tihee
John Greenwood, or Eukosettas,

killer. Chulevah, or Gentleman Tom,

WITNESSES:-(Signed,) Robert Purdy, Secretary to the Commissioners. W. Yates, B. Com'g. Nicholas Byers, U. S. Factor. Wm. L. Lovely, Assistant Agent. B. McGhee. Saml Love. James Blair. Hopkins Lacy. Chs. Hicks, Interpreter.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and scal.

A CONVENTION

Nov. 14, 1805. Between the United States and the Creek Nation of Indians, conProclamation,

cluded at the City of Washington, on the fourteenth day of June 2, 1806. November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred

and five.

Articles of a Convention made between Henry Dearborn, secretary of war, being specially authorised therefor by the President of the United States, and Oche Haujo, William M'Intosh, Tuskenehau Chapce, Tuskenehau, Enehau Thlucco, Checopeheke, Emantlau, chiefs and head men of the Creek nation of Indians, duly authorised and em

powered by said nation. Cession by the Art. I. The aforesaid chiefs and head men do hereby agree, in conCreek Indians. sideration of certain sums of money and goods to be paid to the said

Creek nation by the government of the United States as hereafter stipulated, to cede and forever quit claim, and do, in behalf of their nation, hereby cede, relinquish, and forever quit claim unto the United States all right, title, and interest, which the said nation have or claim, in or unto a certain tract of land, situate between the rivers Oconee and Oc

mulgee (except as hereinafter excepted) and bounded as follows, viz: Boundaries. Beginning at the high shoals of Apalacha, where the line of the treaty

of fort Wilkinson touches the same, thence running in a straight line, to the mouth of Ulcofauhatche, it being the first large branch or fork of the Ocmulgee, above the Seven Islands: Provided, however, That if the said line should strike the Ulcofauhatche, at any place above its mouth, that it shall continue round with that stream so as to leave the whole of it on the Indian side; then the boundary to continue from the mouth of the Ulcofauhatche, by the water's edge of the Ocmulgee river, down to its junction with the Oconee; thence up the Oconee to the present boundary at Tauloohatche creek; thence up said creek and following the present boundary line to the first-mentioned bounds, at the high shoals of Apalacha, excepting and reserving to the Creek nation, the title and possession of a tract of land, five miles in length and three in breadth, and bounded as follows, viz: Beginning on the eastern shore of the Ocmulgee river, at a point three miles on a straight line above the mouth of a creek called Oakchoncoolgau, which empties into the Ocmulgee, near the lower part of what is called the old Ocmulgee fields—thence running three miles eastwardly, on a course at right angles with the general course of the river for five miles below the point of beginning;-thence, from the end of the three miles, to run five miles parallel with the said course of the river; thence westwardly, at right angles with the last-mentioned line to the river; thence by the river to the first-mentioned bounds.

And it is hereby agreed, that the President of the United States, for A military the time being, shall have a right to establish and continue a military post, &c. to be

established. post, and a factory or trading house on said reserved tract; and to make such other use of the said tract as may be found convenient for the United States, as long as the government thereof shall think proper to continue the said military post or trading house. And it is also agreed on the part of the Creek nation, that the navigation and fishery of the Ocmulgee, from its junction with the Oconee to the mouth of the Ulcofauhatchee, shall be free to the white people; provided they use no traps for taking fish; but nets and seines may be used, which shall be drawn to the eastern shore only.

Art. II. It is hereby stipulated and agreed, on the part of the Creek U.S. to have nation, that the government of the United States shall forever hereafter a right to the have a right to a horse path, through the Creek country, from the Oc- use of a road to

the Mobile. mulgee to the Mobile, in such direction as shall, by the President of the United States, be considered most convenient, and to clear out the same, and lay logs orer the creeks: And the citizens of said States, shall at all tiines have a right to pass peaceably on said path, under such rego lations and restrictions, as the government of the United States shan from time to time direct; and the Creek chiefs will have boats kept at the several rivers for the conveyance of men and horses, and houses of entertainment established at suitable places on said path for the accommodation of travellers; and the respective ferriages and prices of entertainment for men and horses, shall be regulated by the present agent, Col. Hawkins, or by his successor in office, or as is usual among white people.

Art. III. It is hereby stipulated and agreed, on the part of the United An annuity to States, as a full consideration for the land ceded by the Creek nation in be paid to the

Creek aation. the first article, as well as by permission granted for a horse path through their country, and the occupancy of the reserved tract, at the old Ocmulgee fields, that there shall be paid annually to the Creek nation, by the United States for the term of eight years, twelve thousand dollars in money or goods, and implements of husbandry, at the option of the Creek nation, seasonably signified from time to time, through the agent of the United States, residing with said nation, to the department of war; and eleven thousand dollars shall be paid in like manner, annually, for the term of the ten succeeding years, making in the whole, eighteen payments in the course of eighteen years, without interest : The first payment is to be made as soon as practicable after the ratification of this convention by the government of the United States, and each payment shall be made at the reserved tract, on the old Ocmulgee fields.

Art. IV. And it is hereby further agreed, on the part of the United Blacksmiths to States, that in lieu of all former stipulations relating to blacksmiths, be provided at

the expense of they will furnish the Creek nation for eight years, with two blacksmiths

U.S. and two strikers.

Art. V. The President of the United States may cause the line to Line to be run be run from the high shoals of Apalacha, to the mouth of Ulcosau- at the time, &c. hatche, at such time, and in such manner, as he may deem proper, and

prescribed by

ihe President. this convention shall be obligatory on the contracting parties as soon as the same shall have been ratified by the government of the United States.

Done at the place, and on the day and year above written.

H. DEARBORN.

I

VOL. VII.

13

Oche Haujo,

Tuskenehau,
William McIntosh,

Enehau Thlucco,
Tuskenehau Chapco,

Chekopeheke Emantlau.
Signed and sealed in the presence of, James Madison, Rt. Smith, Benjamin Haw.
kins, Timothy Barnard, Jno. Smith, Andrew McClary.
The foregoing articles have been faithfully interpreted.

TIMOTHY BARNARD, Interpreter.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

A TREATY OF LIMITS

Nov. 16, 1805. Between the United States of America and the Chaktaw Nation Proclamation,

of Indians. Feb. 25, 1808.

Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States of America, by James Robertson, of Tennessee, and Silas Dinsmoor, of New Hampshire, agent of the United States to the Chaktaws, commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States, on the one part, and the Mingoes, Chiefs and warriors of the Chaktaw nation of Indians, in council assembled, on the other part, have entered into the following agree

ment, viz: Cession to the

Article I. The Mingoes, chiefs, and warriors of the Chaktaw nation United States. of Indians in behalf of themselves, and the said nation, do by these pre

sents cede to the United States of America, all the lands to which they now have or ever had claim, lying to the right of the following lines, to say. Beginning at a branch of the Humacheeto where the same is intersected by the present Chaktaw boundary, and also by the path leading from Natchez to the county of Washington, usually called M'Clarey's path, thence eastwardly along M'Clarey's path, to the east or left bank of Pearl river, thence on such a direct line as would touch the lower end of a bluff on the left bank of Chickasawhay river the first above the Hiyoowannee towns, called Broken Bluff, to a point within four miles of the Broken Bluff, thence in a direct line nearly parallel with the river to a point whence an east line of four miles in length will intersect the river below the lowest settlement at present occupied and improved in the Hiyoowannee town, thence still east four miles, thence in a direct line nearly parallel with the river to a point on a line to be run from the lower end of the Broken Bluff to Faluktabunnee on the Tombigbee river four miles from the Broken Bluff, thence along the said line to Faluktabunnee, thence east to the boundary between the Creeks and Chaktaws on the ridge dividing the waters running into the Alabama from those running into Tombigbee, thence southwardly along

the said ridge and boundary to the southern point of the Chaktaw claim. Reservation. Reserving a tract of two miles square run on meridians and parallels so

as to include the houses and improvements in the town of Fuketcheepoonta, and reserving also a tract of five thousand one hundred and twenty acres, beginning at a post on the left bank of Tombigbee river opposite the lower end of Hatchatigbee Bluff, thence ascending the river four miles front and two back one half, for the of Alzira, the other half for the use of Sophia, daughters of Samuel Mitchell, by Molly, a Chaktaw woman. The latter reserve to be subject to the same

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