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ber, in the year one thousand eight hundred and four, and in the
twenty-ninth year of the independence and sovereignty of the
United States.

DANIEL SMITH,
RETURN J. MEIGS.

John McLamore,

Tolluntuskie,

Tagustiskee,
Tulio,

Sour Mush,
Quotequeskee,

Keatehee,
Path Killer,

James Vann.
WITNESSES.—Rob. Purdy, Secretary. John McKee. Jno. Campbell, Cap. 2d U
States' Regt. commanding. John Brahan, Lieut. 2d reg't Infantry. Thos. J. Van
Dyke, Surgeon's Mate. Wm. Charp. Hinchey Pettway. Wm. L. Lovely, Ass't.
Ag't
. Ch. Hicks, Interpreter.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

TREATY WITH THE SOCK AND FOX INDIANS.

Aug. 4, 1824.

Proclamation, To perpetuate peace and friendship between the United States and Jan. 18, 1825. the Sock and Fox tribes or nations of Indians, and to remove all future cause of dissensions which may arise from undefined territorial boundaries, the President of the United States of America, by William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, and sole Commissioner specially appointed for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs and Head Men of the Sock and Fox tribes or nations, fully deputised to act for and in behalf of their said nations, of the other part, have entered into the following articles and conditions, viz:

ARTICLE 1st. The Sock and Fox tribes or nations of Indians, by Agreements their deputations in council assembled, do hereby agree, in considera- entered into by

said tribes. tion of certain sums of money, &c. to be paid to the said Sock and Fox tribes, by the Government of the United States, as hereinafter stipulated, to cede and for ever quit claim, and do, in behalf of their said tribes or nations, hereby cede, relinquish, and forever quit claim, unto the United States, all right, title, interest, and claim, to the lands which the said Sock and Fox tribes have, or claim, within the limits of the state of Missouri, which are situated, lying, and being, between the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, and a line running from the Missouri, at the entrance of Kansas river, north one hundred miles to the Northwest corner of the state of Missouri, and from thence east to the Mississippi. It being understood, that the small tract of land lying between the rivers Desmoin and the Mississippi, and the section of the

1843, ch. 88. above line between the Mississippi and the Desmoin, is intended for

1844, ch. 54. the use of the half-breeds belonging to the Sock and Fox nations; they holding it, however, by the same title, and in the same manner, that other Indian titles are held.

ARTICLE 2d. The Chiefs and Head Men who sign this convention, Lands ceded, for themselves and in behalf of their tribes, do acknowledge the lands &c. east and south of the lines described in the first article, so far as the Indians claimed the same, to belong to the United States, and that none of their tribes shall be permitted to settle or hunt upon any part of it, after the first day of January, 1826, without special permission from the Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

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Annuities, &c. ARTICLE 3d. It is hereby stipulated and agreed, on the part of the

United States, as a full consideration for the claims and länds ceded by the Sock and Fox tribes in the first article, there shall be paid to the Sock and Fox nations, within the present year, one thousand dollars in

cash, or merchandize; and in addition to the annuities stipulated to be Ante, p. 84. paid to the Sock and Fox tribes by a former treaty, the United States

do

agree to pay to the said Sock tribe, five hundred dollars, and to the Fox tribe five hundred dollars, annually, for the term of ten succeeding years; and, at the request of the Chiefs of the said Sock and Fox nations, the Commissioner agrees to pay to Morice Blondeau, a half Indian of the Fox tribe, the sum of five hundred dollars, it being a debt due by the said nation to the aforesaid Blondeau, for property

taken from him during the late war. Assistance to

Article 4th. The United States engage to provide and support a be rendered Blacksmith for the Sock and Fox nations, so long as the President of them.

the United States may think proper, and to furnish the said nations with such farming utensils and cattle, and to employ such persons to

aid them in their agriculture, as the President may deem expedient. Payment of ARTICLE 5th. The annuities stipulated to be paid by the 3d article, the annuities. are to be paid either in money, merchandize, provisions, or domestic

animals, at the option of the aforesaid tribes, and when the said annuities or part thereof is paid in merchandize, it is to be delivered to them at the first cost of the goods at St. Louis, free from cost of transporta

tion. Treaty obliga. Article 6th. This treaty shall take effect and be obligatory on the tory when rati contracting parties so soon as the same shall be ratified by the Presi.

dent of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof.

In testimony whereof, the said William Clark, Commissioner as afore

said, and the Chiefs and Head Men of the Sock and Fox tribes of Indians as aforesaid, have hereunto set their hands, at Washington City, this fourth day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-four.

WM. CLARK.

Socks.

Foxes.
Pah-sha-pa-ha (Stabber)

Fai-mah (The Bear)
Kah-kee-kai-maik (All Fish)

Ka-pol-e-qua (White Nosed Fox)
Wah-kee-chai (Crouching Eagle) Peea-mash-ka (The Fox winding his
Kee-o-kuck (Watchful Fox)

horn)
Kah-kee-kai-maik (All Fish)

Kee-sheswa (The Sun)
Sah-col-o-quoit (Rising Cloud)
WITNESSES AT SIGNING.—'

-Thomas L. McKenney. Law. Taliaferro, Indian Agent
at St. Peter's. G. W. Kennerly, Indian Agent. A. Baronet Vesques, Acting S. I.
A. and Int. Maurice Blondeau. J. T. Honore. Jno. W. Johnson. Meriwether
Lewis Clark. Noal Dashnay, Interpreter.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and scal.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Made and concluded at the City of Washington, on the fourth Aug. 4, 1824. day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-four, Proclamation, between William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Jan. 18, 1825. being specially authorized by the President of the United States thereto, and the undersigned Chiefs and Head men, of the loway Tribe or Nation, duly authorized and empowered by the said Nation.

ARTICLE 1st. The Ioway Tribe or Nation of Indians, by their depu- Lands ceded ties, Ma-hos-kah, (or White Cloud,) and Mah-ne-hah-nah, (or Great to the U.S. Walker,) in Council assembled, do hereby agree, in consideration of a certain sum of money, &c. to be paid to the said Ioway Tribe, by the government of the United States, as hereinafter stipulated, to cede and forever, quit claim, and do, in behalf of their said Tribe, hereby cede, relinquish, and forever quit claim, unto the United States, all right, title, interest, and claim, to the lands which the said Ioway Tribe have, or claim, within the State of Missouri, and situated between the Mississippi and Missouri rivers and a line running from the Missouri, at the mouth or entrance of Kanzas river, north one hundred miles, to the northwest corner of the limits of the state of Missouri, and, from thence, east to the Mississippi.

ARTICLE 2d. It is hereby stipulated and agreed, on the part of the Payment for United States, as a full compensation for the claims and lands ceded by said cession. the Ioway Tribe in the preceding article, there shall be paid to the said loway tribe, within the present year, in cash or merchandise, the amount of five hundred dollars, and the United States do further agree to pay to the Ioway Tribe, five hundred dollars, annually, for the term of ten succeeding years.

ARTICLE 3d. The Chiefs and Head Men who sign this Treaty, for Acknowledg. themselves, and in behalf of their Tribe, do acknowledge that the landsment of Indians. east and south of the lines described in the first article, (which has been run and marked by Colonel Sullivan,) so far as the Indians claimed the same, to belong to the United States, and that none of their tribe shall be permitted to settle or hunt upon any part of it, after 1st day of January, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six, without special permission from the Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

Article 4th. The undersigned Chiefs, for themselves, and all parts Protcction of of the Ioway tribe, do acknowledge themselves and the said Ioway U.S. acknow. Tribe, to be under the protection of the United States of America, and ledged. of no other sovereign whatsoever; and they also stipulate, that the said loway tribe will not hold any treaty with any foreign powers, individual. state, or with individuals of any state.

ARTICLE 5th. The United States engage to provide and support a Assistance to blacksmith for the Ioway Tribe, so long as the President of the United be rendered In.

dians States may think proper, and to furnish the said Tribe with such farming utensils and cattle, and to employ such persons to aid them in their agriculture, as the President may deem expedient. ARTICLE 6th. The annuities stipulated to be paid by the second

Payment of article, to be paid either in money, merchandise, provisions, or domestic annuities. animals, at the option of the aforesaid Tribe; and when the said an

nuities, or any part thereof, is paid in merchandise, it is to be delivered to them at the first cost of the goods at St. Louis, free from cost of

transportation. Treaty obliga.

ARTICLE 7th. This Treaty shall take effect, and be obligatory on the tory when ratio contracting parties, so soon as the same shall be ratified by the President fied.

of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof.

In testimony whereof, the said William Clark, Commissioner as afore

said, and the Chiefs and Head Men of the Ioway Tribe of Indians, as aforesaid, have hereunto set their hands this day and year first before written.

WM. CLARK. Ma-hos-kah, (White Cloud,)

Mah-ne-hah-nah, (Great Walker.) WITNESSES PRESENT, Thos. L. McKenney. G. W. Kennerley, Indian Agent. Law. Taliaferro, Indian Agent at St. Peter's A. Baronet Vasques, Act. sub. Agt. and Interpreter. Meriwether Lewis Clark. Jno. W. Johnson. William P. Clark. William Radford.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Between the United States of America and the Quapaw Nation

of Indians. Nov. 15, 1824.

Article 1. The Quapaw Nation of Indians cede to the United States Proclamation, Feb. 19, 1825.

of America, in consideration of the promises and stipulations hereinLands ceded after made, all claim or title which they may have to lands in the Terby the Qua

ritory of Arkansas, comprised in the following boundaries, to wit: paws.

Beginning at a point on the Arkansas river, opposite to the Post of Arkansas, and running thence a due south-west course to the Ouachita river; and thence, up the same, to the Saline Fork; and up the Saline Fork, to a point from whence a due north-east course will strike the Arkansas river at Little Rock: and thence down the right (or south bank) of the Arkansas river to the place of beginning.

ART. 2. In consideration of the cession made in the first article

of this Treaty, by the aforesaid Chiefs and Warriors, the United States. $500 to be engage to pay to the four head Chiefs of the Quapaw Nation, the sum paid to the head of five hundred dollars each, in consideration of the losses they will suschiefs, &c.

tain by removing from their farms and improvements. The payment to be made at the time they receive their annuity for the year 1825. And, also, to the said nation, the sum of four thousand dollars, to be paid in goods, at the signing of this Treaty. And the United States also engage to pay to the Quapaw Nation, one thousand dollars in specie, annually, for the term of eleven years, in addition to their present annuity

ART. 3. The United States hereby guaranty to the said Nation of

Indians, the same right to hunt on the lands by them hereby ceded, as Rights guaran

was guarantied to them by a Treaty, concluded at St. Louis, on the tied them. 24th of August, 1818, between the said Quapaw Nation of Indians and Ante, p. 176.

William Clark and AugustE CHOTEAU, Commissioners on the part of the United States.

ART. 4. The Quapaw Tribe of Indians will hereafter be concentrated and confined to the district of country inhabited by the Caddo Indians, and form a part of said Tribe. The said nation of Indians are to com

To be confined mence removing to the district allotted them, before the twentieth day to the district of of January, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six.

country occu

pied by the Art. 5. For the purpose of facilitating the removal of the said Tribe, Caddo Indians. to the district of country allotted them, and as a compensation for the losses sustained, and the inconveniences to which they may be exposed by said removal, the United States will furnish them with corn, meat, be rendered to

Assistance to and salt, for six months, from the first day of January, one thousand Quapaws. eight hundred and twenty-six. The United States further agree to furnish a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars, to be expended by their agent, to facilitate the transportation of the said Tribe to the district of country herein assigned them. An Agent, Sub Agent, or Interpreter, shall be appointed to accompany said Tribe, and to reside

among them.

Art. 6. From the cession aforesaid, there shall be reserved to James Scull, in consideration of a debt of seven thousand five hundred dollars, due to him from the Quapaw Nation, and recognised in open Council, two sections of land commencing on the Arkansas river, opposite to reserved to

$7500 to be Mrs. Embree's, and running up and back from said river for quantity. James Scull. And the United States guaranty to the Quapaw Nation the payment of the said debt of seven thousand five hundred dollars, either by the ratification of the grant made in this article, or by the payment of said amount in money, exclusive of the amount stipulated to be paid to the said nation by this Treaty.

Art. 7. There shall be granted by the United States, to the following persons, being Indians by descent, the following tracts of Land: To Francois Imbeau, one quarter section of land, commencing at a point on the Arkansas river, opposite the upper end of Wright Daniel's farm,

Tracts of land and thence, up and back from said river, for quantity. To Joseph Du

tain persons, chassien, one quarter section of land, commencing at the lower corner Indians by de of the quarter section granted to Francois Imbeau, and running down scent. and back from said river for quantity. To Saracen, a half breed Quapaw, eighty acres of land, to be laid off so as to include his improvement, where he now resides, opposite Vaugine's. To Batiste Socie, eighty acres of land, laying above and adjoining Saracen's grant. To Joseph Bonne, eighty acres of land, lying above and adjoining Socie's grant. To Baptiste Bonne, eighty acres of land, lying above and adjoining Joseph Bonne's grant. To Lewis Bartelmi, eighty acres of Jand, lying above and adjoining Baptiste Bonne's grant. To Antoine Duchassin, eighty acres of land, lying above and adjoining Bartelmi's grant. To Baptiste Imbeau, eighty acres of land, lying above and adjoining A. Duchassin's grant. To Francois Coupot, eighty acres of land, lying above and adjoining Baptiste Imbeau's grant. To Joseph Valliere, eighty acres of land, lying above and adjoining Francois Coupot's grant. All the said tracts of land shall be laid off, so as to con. form to the lines of the United States' surveys, and binding on the Arkansas river, Art. 8. This treaty shall take effect, and be obligatory on the con

When to take

effect. tracting parties, so soon as the same shall be ratified by the Senate of the United States.

In testimony whereof, the Commissioner on the part of the United

States, ROBERT CRITTENDEN, and the undersigned Chiefs and
Warriors of the said Nation, have hereunto subscribed their names

and affixed their Seals. VOL. VII. 30

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