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This flue constitutes the chief feature in the "Galloway Boiler," and in it are placed 33 conical water tubes, each 10in. diameter at the top or large end, and 54in. diameter at the lower end, fixed in an upright position, in such a way as to support the flue, and to intercept and break up the flame and heated gases, when passing from the fire-grate or furnaces to the chimney. Along the sides of the flues there are also placed several wrought iron stops or bafflers, which deflect the currents of heated air and cause them to impinge against the tubes, so as to absorb all the available heat possible.

The conical water pipes, or "Galloway Tubes" as they are now generally called, present a direct heating surface to the action of the flame, &c., this effects a great saving of fuel; they also promote rapid circulation of water, and thereby maintain that uniform temperature which is so essential to the durability and safety of all steam boilers. Unequal expansion or contraction is avoided, and its attendant evils; undue strains and eventual rupture.

An important improvement has just been effected in the construction of the original Galloway boiler, which the makers have patented, and which is introduced in the three boilers now exhibited.

This improvement consists in the arching of the bottom part of the oval back flue, by means of which greater facilities are furnished for cleaning and examining the lower part of boiler when required.

A further advantage is also obtained by having the conical tubes all radiating from one centre, they are consequently one uniform length, and are interchangeable.

The three boilers here shown are each 28ft. long by 7ft. diameter, and are made suitable for an ordinary working pressure of 75 lbs. to the square inch. The shell or casing is made of Bessemer steel plates -in thick, double riveted in the longitudinal seams. Each of these boilers is capable of supplying steam to drive a condensing engine indicating 300 horse-power.

The two furnaces are each 2ft. 9 in. diameter by 7ft. 6in. long, made of steel plates in three rings, flanged and riveted together so as to prevent any seam or rivet heads being exposed to the action of the fire. The mountings or boiler fittings include all the modern and most approved appliances for the safe and economical working of the boilers, as now worked in England, viz. :—

"GALLOWAY" TUBE.

Wrought iron furnace-frames and doors, fitted with slides and baffle plates, to regulate the admission of air to the combustion chamber, and to prevent smoke. Fusible plugs are also placed in the crown of each furnace as a safe-guard against overheating, in case the water within the boiler should be reduced below the safe line of working.

Wrought iron solid welded manhole, Water Gauges in duplicate, Steam Pressure Gauge, Check Feed Valve, Brass Blow-off Cock, Scum Apparatus, for collecting and discharging any impurities in the water within the boiler, Steam Junction Valve, Dead Weight Safety Valve, Lever Safety Valve, and low water and high steam Alarm Whistles, &c.

With these boilers the makers also exhibit three "Galloway" or Cone Tubes similar to those fixed in the oval flues, but which are now being very largely intro duced into both single and double flued boilers, a model of which is also exhibited.

These tubes are welded and flanged from one plate, and can be formed to suit any size of flue or combustion chamber.

When applied to single or double flued boilers they are generally fixed crosswise, s as to present as large and direct a heating surface as possible to the flame and heate gases passing through the boiler.

These tubes not only promote a saving of fuel ranging from 15 to 20 per cent

[graphic]

but they strengthen the flue in such a manner as to render hooping with angle or tee iron unnecessary, the circulation of water is also promoted, and unequal expansion prevented.

These tubes are made by special machinery, and can be supplied whenever necessary, at two or three days

notice.

The manufacture of these tubes and boilers by Messrs. Galloway and Sons has now been carried on for many years, and their establishments in Manchester bear testimony to the increasing demand which is made for this class of work. With their present appliances many thousand tubes, and from 300 to 400 boilers per year, are made and dispatched to all parts of the world.

Gardner & Sons, 453 & 454, Strand, 3 & 4, Duncannon Street, London.

LAMPS FOR DOMESTIC PURPOSES.-These lamps are all arranged to burn petroleum on Messrs. Gardner's improved duplex [doubled wick] principle, which improves their illuminating power and makes it possible to get rid of the old unsightly globe. In the offices of the British Commission are patterns based on mediæval models, reproduced in brass repoussé and polished, with twisted serpentine columns, crystal and ruby glass, which are combinations not attempted before. There are also hanging lamps on the same principle, some of which are especially constructed for office use.

The barracks and other buildings belonging to the British Commission are lighted by lamps on the same principle adapted to their various purposes.

In Messrs. Gardner's cases are lamps of this description in designs executed in silver and gilt plate, which are reproductions of classic, renaissance, and Indian styles. In these cases also are reproductions of old English candlesticks.

READING OR STUDY LAMPS.-In electro plate, but made also in brass or bronze. Burn colza or any vegetable oil, and are especially recommended on account of their convenient form and soft light. They are also made to burn paraffin and the heavy mineral oils known as mineral sperm.

SURGICAL LAMPS.-Used in the Franco-Prussian War.

SHIP CABIN LAMPS.-New designs of cabin wall lamps on the duplex principle in electro-plate and in brass, &c. A section of one of the lamps supplied to H.M.S." Alert" and "Discovery" forming the Arctic Expedition of 1875. This is a strong lamp, riveted together, and fitted with a double case of copper, the Intervening space being filled with felt to prevent the coagulation of oil and to permit the consumption of fat er tallow if needed. The flame is three inches high and equals 26 candles. Silver Medal awarded, Paris Maritime Exhibition, 1875.

THE SOLDIERS LAMP.-Designed for and exhibited by permission of H.M.'s Indian Government. Can be ad as a hand lantern, or suspended or fastened to a tent pole. Will burn steadily under a heavy wind, and the ventilation is not liable to become clogged as in out-door lamps where gauze is used as a protector. The lazing is common window glass, which in case of breakage can be easily replaced.

THE TRAVELLING LAMP.-Burns mineral or colza oil and contains one week supply, will keep steady in --y draught; is arranged as a suspending or table lamp and fits in a small and very light tin case, without acking.

PATENT STIRRUP LAMP.-For use by exploring parties, or on rough bridle paths.

TRAVELLING READING LAMP.-For use in private cabins, railway compartments, &c. Made with patent -acting fastenings. Pocket size.

SHIP OF MILITARY BAND LAMP.-Adapted for the circular band stands and constructed to light two music ands at once.

This flue constitutes the chief feature in the "Galloway Boiler," and in it are placed 33 conical water tubes, each 10in. diameter at the top or large end, and 54in. diameter at the lower end, fixed in an upright position, in such a way as to support the flue, and to intercept and break up the flame and heated gases, when passing from the fire-grate or furnaces to the chimney. Along the sides of the flues there are also placed several wrought iron stops or bafflers, which deflect the currents of heated air and cause them to impinge against the tubes, so as to absorb all the available heat possible.

The conical water pipes, or "Galloway Tubes" as they are now generally called, present a direct heating surface to the action of the flame, &c., this effects a great saving of fuel; they also promote rapid circulation of water, and thereby maintain that uniform temperature which is so essential to the durability and safety of all steam boilers. Unequal expansion or contraction is avoided, and its attendant evils; undue strains and eventual rupture.

An important improvement has just been effected in the construction of the original Galloway boiler, which the makers have patented, and which is introduced in the three boilers now exhibited.

This improvement consists in the arching of the bottom part of the oval back flue, by means of which greater facilities are furnished for cleaning and examining the lower part of boiler when required.

A further advantage is also obtained by having the conical tubes all radiating from one centre, they are consequently one uniform length, and are interchangeable.

The three boilers here shown are each 28ft. long by 7ft. diameter, and are made suitable for an ordinary working pressure of 75 lbs. to the square inch. The shell or casing is made of Bessemer steel plates -in. thick, double riveted in the longitudinal seams. Each of these boilers is capable of supplying steam to drive a condensing engine indicating 300 horse-power.

The two furnaces are each 2ft. 9 in. diameter by 7ft. 6in. long, made of steel plates in three rings, flanged and riveted together so as to prevent any seam or rivet heads being exposed to the action of the fire. The mountings or boiler fittings include all the modern and most approved appliances for the safe and economical working of the boilers, as now worked in England, viz. :

"GALLOWAY" TUBE.

Wrought iron furnace-frames and doors, fitted with slides and baffle plates, to re-, gulate the admission of air to the combustion chamber, and to prevent smoke. Fusible plugs are also placed in the crown of each furnace as a safe-guard against overheating, in case the water within the boiler should be reduced below the safe line of working.

Wrought iron solid welded manhole, Water Gauges in duplicate, Steam Pressure Gauge, Check Feed Valve, Brass Blow-off Cock, Scum Apparatus, for collecting and discharging any impurities in the water within the boiler, Steam Junction Valve, Dead Weight Safety Valve, Lever Safety Valve, and low water and high steam Alarm Whistles, &c.

With these boilers the makers also exhibit three " Galloway" or Cone Tubes similar to those fixed in the oval flues, but which are now being very largely intro duced into both single and double flued boilers, a model of which is also exhibited.

These tubes are welded and flanged from one plate, and can be formed to suit any size of flue or combustion chamber.

When applied to single or double flued boilers they are generally fixed crosswise, s as to present as large and direct a heating surface as possible to the flame and he gases passing through the boiler.

These tubes not only promote a saving of fuel ranging f

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angle or see ira unnecessary,

but they strengthen the fae in such a muzzer 18 3. når baging
circulation of water is also promet-i voi me na opassion prevented.
These tubes are made by speel zweizery, wi na te stelei whenever necessary, at two or thr
notice.

The manufacture of these tubes and burrs Kees Gray and Sons has now been carri
many years, and their estabüstment in Kobeter bear testinocy to the increasing demand wh
for this class of work. With their present anglabres many dosud tubes, and from 300 to 40C:
year, are made and dispatched to all parts of the world

Gardner & Sons, 453 & 454, Stran 3 & 4. Dusen Street, London. LAMPS FOR DOMESTIC PURPOSE-Tarse lamps are all arranged to burn petroleum o X improved duplex [doubled wick] principle, which improves their illuminating power and Iget rid of the old unsightly glibe. In the fes of the British Commission are patter models, reproduced in brass repcassé and polished, with twisted serpentine column, e which are combinations not attempted before. There are also hanging lamps on the same t which are especially constructed for ore use.

The barracks and other buildings belonging to the British Commission are light in
principle adapted to their various purposes.

In Messrs. Gardner's cases are lamps of this description in designs execu
which are reproductions of classic, renaissance, and Indian styles. In these casse, 2′′
English candlesticks.

READING OR STUDY LAMPS.-In electro plate, but made also in brass or 1.
vegetable oil, and are especially recommended on account of their convenient for
also made to burn paraffin and the heavy mineral oils known as mineral sperm.
SURGICAL LAMPS.-Used in the Franco-Prussian War.

SHIP CABIN LAMPS.-New designs of cabin wall lamps on the duplex brass, &c. A section of one of the lamps supplied to H.M.S. "Alert" and " Expedition of 1875. This is a strong lamp, riveted together, and fitte: w intervening space being filled with felt to prevent the coagulation of oil a or tallow if needed. The flame is three inches high and equals 26 cauda Maritime Exhibition, 1875.

THE SOLDIERS LAMP.-Designed for and exhibited by permission of. used as a hand lantern, or suspended or fastened to a tent pole. Will snor the ventilation is not liable to become clogged as in out-door lamps where glazing is common window glass, which in case of breakage can be

y 2-
THE TRAVELLING LAMP.-Burns mineral or colza oil and couŠANÉLA
any draught; is arranged as a suspending or table lamp and fits is -
packing.

PATENT STIRRUP LAMP.-For use by exploring parties, or o
TRAVELLING READING LAMP.-For use in private o

self-acting fastenings. Pocket size.

SHIP or MILITARY BAND LAMP.-Adapted f

stands at once.

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on being more commodious ngers, and their luggage; this he colour of the panels of the

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a the lightest principle consistent ollinge's patent axles, painted in the amily generally, the best lamps and pile carpet. The head is fitted with to open and close it instantly and with s, which prevent the doors being opened

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ess and lightness, very quiet in its colours of colours, the interior Rembrandt or (

REGISTERED TRAVELLING, READING, SHIP, OR TENT LAMP.-Gives a powerful light and is extremely portable and easy to manage. Contains 18 hours' consumption.

PATENT SAFETY POWDER MAGAZINE LAMP.-Designed by request of the Home Office to burn in gunpowder magazines and other dangerous places in perfect safety, and to exclude the powder which is found floating in magazines and stores in the form of fine dust, which in other lamps collects inside, and is sure, when much is collected, to explode. This explosion passes through the gauze, and is almost certain to convey incandescent particles of powder to the magazine store. The supply and exit air passages are under and over a series of screens, that is to say, air to support combustion enters the lamp under an inverted outer ledge and then passes through the holes made in the casing to a narrow space formed by an inner lining, so that the air must first pass up to reach the holes in the casing, then down the inner space, and finally up a narrow space between. The top part of the lamp is constructed on substantially the same principle, that is, the exit air passages are made zig-zag; but in case they should ever become clogged with soot, two out of three parts which form the passages are hinged to the casing, and are secured by a spring lock, so that when these parts are unbolted they can be turned back on their hinges and easily cleared of any soot that may have become deposited therein. The bottom and sides of the lamp are immoveable, and the burner is dropped in through the top of the lamp, which is secured with a spring lock as already mentioned.

Every detail of the outer casing has been carefully considered, and there are no projecting parts where dust can settle and accumulate. The lamp has a bull's eye lens in front; the side lights are glazed with glass oneeighth of an inch thick, protected by strong copper wire. The handle moves on a pivot. The burner is a 2-inch flat wick and a reflector is added to increase the brilliancy. The lamp and lantern is made of copper, bright tin, or tin japanned. The highest temperature ever observed on the outside of the lantern has been 126°, the exploding temperature of gunpowder being 600°. Adopted by the Government, Thames Conservancy, &c.

Silver Medal, Paris, 1875.

MILITARY OR TRAVELLING CANTEENS.-Each canteen contains every table requisite in full size for four persons, including plates, knives, forks, spoons, cups, cruet and flask, made of nickel silver or electro-plate and packing in a small leather case.

Lewis, John, 78, Watling Street, London, has supplied all the carpets laid down in the British Staff Quarters. These have been manufactured by him at Halifax. The style of the carpets is "Illuminated Indian" intended to be rich and at the same time in retirement and in correspondence with the subdued furniture for these buildings which has been selected by the British Commission.

Mr. Lewis received the Medal for Progress at the Vienna Exhibition, in addition to which the Emperor of Austria honoured him with an Order of Knighthood. And at the Paris Maritime Exhibition, 1875, Mr. Lewis had a Gold Medal awarded for beauty of design and colouring and for excellence of manufacture.

Minton, Hollins, & Co., Patent Tile Works, Stoke-upon-Trent; London House and Show Rooms, 50, Conduit Street, Regent Street, W.; Manchester, Bridgewater Club Chambers, 110, King Street. Encaustic Tiles for Hall and Verandah of British Staff Quarters.

For excellence in the production of Tiles, and for variety in design, the following Awards have been obtained, viz.:-London, 1852, Council Medal; Paris, 1855, Gold Medal; London, 1862, First Class Medal: Paris, 1867, Gold Medal; Moscow, 1872, Gold Medal; Vienna, 1873, Medal for "Progress."

This firm was established by the late Herbert Minton and his Nephew, Michael Daintry Hollins (now sole proprietor).

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