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(Prom a Printing by Charles Edward Armand Dumaresa, exhibited in the Paris Salon of 1873.)

OF

THE UNITED STATES

FOR SCHOOLS;

INCLUDING A CONCISE ACCOUNT OF THE DISCOVERY OP
AMERICA, THE COLONIZATION OF THE LAND,

AND THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR.

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With Maps, Hllustrations, Analyses, and Bibliographies.

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E178

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.M9

STANDARD TEXT-BOOKS ON CIVICS.

By WILLIAM A. MOWRY, Ph.D.

STUDIES IN CIVIL GOVERNMENT. Introductory price, 96 cents.
ELEMENTS OF Civil GOVERNMENT. Introductory price, 72 cents.
ELEMENTS OF Civil GOVERNMENT. In State Editions, with a Treatise on

the particular State. Introductory price, 90 cents.

INVALUABLE AIDS IN TEACHING HISTORY.

By WILLIAM A. MOWRY, Ph.D., and ARTHUR MAY MOWRY, A.M.

FIRST STEPS IN THE HISTORY OF OUR COUNTRY. Introductory price, 60 cents.
A History OF THE UNITED STATES FOR SCHOOLS. Introductory price, $1.00.

By TOWNSEND MacCOUN.

HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES, with Text. Introductory

price, 90 cents.

HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY CHARTS:

UNITED STATES. With patent Supporter. $15.00.
EUROPE, — ANCIENT AND CLASSICAL. With Supporter. $15.00.
EUROPE, — MEDIÆVAL AND MODERN. With Supporter. $15.00.

Copyright, 1896,

By SILVER, BURDETT AND COMPANY.

PREFACE.

Α'

MERICAN history should be studied in all American schools.

This is evident not only because it is the history of our own country, but because it is the most marvellous history of the world. It is, moreover, the most fascinating of all history, especially to young minds. Furthermore, it is the most useful history that the youth can study.

History is of value only so far as it relates to the development of mankind, the elevation of the race. The history of our country unfolds the surest, strongest, and most rapid development to be found in all countries and in all ages.

This book is a school-book, especially designed for class use in the schools, both public and private, of the United States. The authors, at the outset, laid down certain principles in the preparation of its pages. These principles may be stated as follows:

1. Accuracy. — An American humorist has embodied an important truth in the following statement: “It is better not to know so many things than to know so many things that are not so.” Our histories and biographies have too often been filled with anecdotes and incidents which have no more foundation in fact than the stories of Baron Munchausen or Sinbad the sailor. From W. L. Weems and Peter Parley down to the latest history-writer and story-teller, the children have had placed before them the graphic outlines of cherry-tree stories and Lincoln anecdotes, until the boys and girls can scarcely discriminate as to truthfulness between history and Grimm's Fairy Tales. In studying history the learner should be taught that which is true, and the facts should be told with due relation and in their proper connection.

2. Clearness. — The next requisite for a good school history is clearness of statement. This implies sufficient detail to make the narration lucid and interesting. Dry facts and dates strung together in a chronological narrative will not appear to the child's mind connected or interesting. Enough must be told to convey to his imagination a related story.

3. A Topical Arrangement. - While many teachers say that their pupils regard history as dull and uninviting, others glow with enthusiasm in relating how charming and fascinating the children find the study. Much of this charm comes from a logical sequence of the related events. Children everywhere are delighted to find natural results flowing from previously considered causes.

It is, therefore, important that the subjects be treated topically, and hence that the chronological order be not followed too rigidly.

4. Mental Development. — This study, like all others, should be so carried on as to stimulate mental growth. It is not sufficient to present to the child's mind a great number and variety of facts to be memorized, but rather the sequence of fruitful and suggestive events should be apprehended and appreciated.

5. Well-balanced Periods. Some books are very full upon the Colonial period, followed by a too brief account of the War of the Revolution; others pass lightly over the development of the country during the first half of this century, only to dwell with unnecessary detail upon the battles of the Mexican and Civil Wars. This book has 115 pages of the Colonial period, — that is, down to 1763 ; 76 pages relating to the Revolutionary period; 92 pages showing the development of the young republic between 1781 and 1860; 50 pages upon the War of the Rebellion; and 47 pages concerning the history since 1865.

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