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Act of 1856, ch. Sec. 9. And be it further enacted, That the eighth section of the act 130, 6, 8, respect of the eighteenth of August, eighteen hundred and fifty-six, entitled “ An ing George H. Giddinos de - act making appropriations for the service of the Post-Office Department,” clared mandatory &c., be construed as mandatory; and that the Postmaster-General be Payment to him. and he hereby is required to pay to the said Giddings the sum of thirtyAnte, p. 95. three thousand and five hundred dollars per annum in lieu of the contract

pay, on mail route number twelve thousand nine hundred, as directed by

said section, deducting payments heretofore made. Contract au- Sec. 10. And be it further enacted, That the Postmaster-General be, thorized for car- and he is hereby authorize

and he is hereby, authorized to contract for the conveyance of the entire rying the mail from the Missis- letter mail from such point on the Mississippi River, as the contractors sippi to San Fran- may select, to San Francisco, in the State of California, for six years, at cisco by land.

a cost not exceeding three hundred thousand dollars per annum for semimonthly, four hundred and fifty thousand dollars for weekly, or six hundred thousand dollars for semi-weekly service; to be performed semimonthly, weekly, or semi-weekly, at the option of the Postmaster-Gen

eral. Same subject. Sec. 11. And be it further enacted, That the contract shall require the

service to be performed with good four-horse coaches, or spring wagons, suitable for the conveyance of passengers, as well as the safety and secu

rity of the mails. Preëmption Sec. 12. And be it further enacted, That the contractors shall have the right of such con- right of preëmption to three hundred and twenty acres of any land not tractors.

then disposed of or reserved, at each point necessary for a station, not to be nearer than ten miles from each other; and provided, that no mineral

land shall be thus preëmpted. Trip to be per- Sec. 13. And be it further enacted, That the said service shall be performed within 26 formed within twenty-five days for each trip; and that before entering days, and security to be given.

into such contract, the Postmaster-General shall be satisfied of the ability and disposition of the parties bona fide and in good faith to perform the said contract, and shall require good and sufficient security for the performance of the same; the service to commence within twelve months

after the signing of the contract. Mail service on Sec. 14. And be it further enacted, That the Postmaster-General of the

pund, United States be and he hereby is authorized and directed to accept the Lowest bid on record to be ac- lowest bid offered and now on record, (provided the same shall not exceed cepted.

twenty-three thousand dollars a year, for weekly services,) to convey the United States mails in good and sufficient steamer or steamers under the advertisement of the Postmaster-General of January nineteen, eighteen hundred and fifty-five, for “ proposals for conveying the United States mails on Puget's Sound, Washington Territory," and to contract with the bidders thereof to put into immediate operation the said service on Puget's Sound, Washington Territory, commencing at Olympia, and supplying Steilacoom, Seattle, Port Madison, Port Gamble, Port Ludlow,

Port Townsend, Penn's Cove, Bellingham Bay, (Whatcorn,) New Dun1845, ch. 69, $ 8.

geness, and such other places on said route as the Postmaster-General may direct; said service to be paid for out of any money in the treasury

not otherwise appropriated : Provided, That the said service shall be perVol. v. p. 750. formed in first class steamboats, under the eighth section of the act ap

proved March third, eighteen hundred and forty-five. Payment to Sec. 15. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Treasury

man be directed to pay to George Whitman the sum of ten thousand one hun

dred dollars, being the amount of a draft issued in his favor by the Postmaster-General on the eleventh of August, eighteen hundred and thirtyeight upon the postmaster at New Orleans in payment of services rendered by said Whitman as mail contractor, less two thousand dollars paid thereon, which draft was not satisfied by the drawer.

APPROVED, March 3, 1857.

George Whitma

Chap. XCVIL–An Act making ††. for Fortifications and other Works of March 8, 1857. Defence, and for Repairs of Barracks and Quarters, for the Year ending the thirtieth of T June, eighteen hundred and fifty-eight. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the following sums be and they are hereby appropriated, out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the construction, preservation, and repairs of certain fortifications, barracks, and quarters, for the year ending the thirtieth of June, eighteen hundred and fifty-eight. For Fort Montgomery, outlet of Lake Champlain, fifty thousand dollars. For Fort Knox, at the Narrows of the Penobscot River, Maine, fifty thousand dollars. For fortifications at the entrance of Kennebec River, Maine, one hundred thousand dollars. For the commencement of a fortification on Hog Island Ledge in Portland harbor, Maine, fifty thousand dollars. For Fort Warren, Boston harbor, and preservation of its site, ten thousand dollars. For Fort Winthrop, Governor's Island, Boston harbor, thirty thousand dollars. For fortifications at the entrance of New Bedford harbor, one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. For Fort Adams, protection of site, Newport harbor, Rhode Island, fifteen thousand dollars. For Fort Schuyler, East River, New York harbor, twenty thousand dollars. For Fort Richmond, Staten Island, New York harbor, one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. For fortifications at Sandy Hook, New Jersey, outlet of New York harbor, two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. For the commencement of a fort opposite Fort Schuyler, New York, one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. For the erection of a fort on the site of Fort Tompkins in the State of New York, one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. For Fort Delaware, on Delaware River, two hundred thousand dollars. For Fort Carroll, Sollers' Point flats, Baltimore harbor, Maryland, one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. For Fort Calhoun, Hampton Roads, Virginia, one hundred thousand dollars. For Fort Sumpter, Charleston harbor, South Carolina, one hundred thousand dollars. For Fort Pulaski, Savannah River, Georgia, twenty-six thousand dollars. For Fort Clinch, entrance to Cumberland Sound, Florida, seventy-five thousand dollars. For Fort Barrancas, Pensacola harbor, Florida, thirty-three thousand dollars. For Fort Gaines, Dauphin Island, entrance to Mobile Bay, Alabama, one hundred thousand dollars. For defences at Proctor's Landing, Lake Borgne, Louisiana, twentyfive thousand dollars. For Fort Livingston, Grandterre Island, Barrataria Bay, Louisiana, and preservation of its site, twenty thousand dollars. For Fort Taylor, Key West, Florida, two hundred thousand dollars. For Fort Jefferson, Garden Key, Florida, three hundred thousand dollars. For fortifications at Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Bay, California, two hundred thousand dollars.

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For fort at Fort Point, San Francisco Bay, California, three hundred and fifty thousand dollars. For repairs at Fort Hamilton, at the Narrows, New York harbor, ten thousand dollars. For repairs at Fort Lafayette, New York harbor, ten thousand dollars. For repairs of Fort Wood, Bedlow's Island, New York harbor, five thousand dollars. For barracks, quarters, and hospital at Fort Columbus, Governor's Island, New York harbor, fourteen thousand dollars. For purchase of additional land for site of Fort Tompkins, forty-two thousand three hundred dollars. For modification of Fort Madison, Annapolis harbor, Maryland, twenty thousand dollars. For artesian well at Fort Monroe, ten thousand dollars. For repairs of Fort Jackson, Savannah River, Georgia, eighteen thousand dollars. For the fortification of Ship Island, coast of Mississippi, one hundred thousand dollars. For fortifications for the defence of the inner passes into Mobile Bay, (known as Grant's Pass. and Pass au Heron,) one hundred thousand dollars. For repairs of Fort Pickens, Pensacola harbor, Florida, fifteen thousand dollars. For repairs and extension of Fort St. Phillip, Mississippi River, Louisiana, twenty-five thousand dollars. For repairs of Fort Macomb, and preservation of site, Chef Menteur Pass, Louisiana, seven thousand dollars. For repairs of Tower Dupre, Bayou Depre, Louisiana, and perfecting title of site, twelve thousand dollars. For fortifications for the defence of the entrance to Galveston harbor and bay, Texas, eighty thousand dollars. To purchase a site and construct additional defences for San Francisco, California, three hundred thousand dollars. For contingent expenses of fortifications for preservation of sites, protection of titles, and repairs of sudden damages, thirty thousand dollars. For repairs and alterations of barracks, quarters, hospitals, store rooms, and fences at permanent forts not occupied by troops, nineteen thousand dollars. For the construction of permanent platforms for modern cannon of large calibre in the existing fortifications of important harbors, one hundred thousand dollars. APPRoved, March 3, 1857.

CHAP. XCVIII.-An Act reducing the Duty on Imports, and for other Purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That on and after the first day of July, eighteen hundred and fifty-seven, ad valorem duties shall be imposed, in lieu of those now imposed upon goods wares and merchandize imported from abroad into the United States, as follows, viz:

Upon the articles enumerated in schedules A, and B, of the tariff act of eighteen hundred and forty-six, a duty of thirty per centum, and upon those enumerated in schedules C, D, E, F, G, and H, of said act, the duties of twenty-four per centum, nineteen per centum, fifteen per centum, twelve per centum, eight per centum, and four per centum, respectively, with such exceptions as are hereinafter made; and all articles so imported as aforesaid and not enumerated in the said schedules, nor in schedule, I, shall pay a duty of fifteen per centum.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That all manufactures composed wholly of cotton, which are bleached, printed, painted, or dyed, and de laines, shall be transferred to schedule C. Japanned leather or skins of all . *::: kinds, shall be transferred to schedule D. Ginger, green, ripe, dried, . o. preserved or pickled; ochers, and ochrey earths; medicinal roots, leaves, another. gums, and resins in a crude state not otherwise provided for; wares, chemical, earthen or pottery of a capacity exceeding ten gallons, shall be transferred to schedule E. Borate of lime and codilla, or tow of hemp or flax, shall be transferred to schedule F. Antimony, crude or regulus of; Barks of all kinds not otherwise provided for; camphor, crude; cantharides; carbonate of soda; Emery, in lump or pulverized; Fruits, green, ripe, or dried; gums, Arabic, Barbary, copal, East India, Jeddo, Senegal, substitute, tragacanth, and all other gums and resins, in a crude state; machinery exclusively designed and expressly imported for the manufacture of flax and linen goods; sponges; tin in plates or sheets, galvanized or ungalvanized; woods, namely, cedar, lignumvitae, ebony, box, granadilla, mahogany, rose wood, satin wood, and all cabinet woods, shall be transferred to schedule G. Acids, acetic, benzoic, boracic, citric, muriatic, white and yellow, oxalic, pyroligenous and tartaric, and all other acids of every description used for chemical or manufacturing purposes not otherwise provided for; aloes; amber; ambergris; anniseed; annatto, roucon or Orleans; arsenic; articles not in a crude state used in dyeing or tanning not otherwise provided for; assafoetida; asphaltum; barilla; bleaching powder, or chloride of lime; borax crude; boucho leaves; brimstone crude in bulk; cameos, mosaics, diamonds, gems, pearls, rubies, and other precious stones (not set 3) chalk; clay; cochineal; cocoa, cocoanuts, and cocoa shells; cork tree bark; cream of tartar; extract of indigo, extracts and decoctions of logwood and other dyewoods not otherwise provided for; extract of madder; flint, ground; grindstones; gutta percha unmanufactured; india rubber in bottles, slabs or sheets, unmanufactured; India rubber, milk of; indigo; lac spirits; lac sulphur; lastings cut in strips or patterns of the size and shape for shoes, slippers, boots, bootees, gaiters or buttons exclusively, not combined with india rubber; manufactures of mohair cloth, silk twist, or other manufactures of cloth, suitable for the manufacture of shoes, cut in slips or patterns of the size and shape for shoes, slippers, boots, bootees, gaiters or buttons exclusively, not combined with india rubber; music printed with lines, bound or unbound; oils, palm, teal and cocoanut; prussian blue; soda ash; spices of all kinds; watch materials and unfinished parts of watches; and woad, or pastel, shall be transferred to schedule H.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That on and after the first day of Schedule of free July, eighteen hundred and fifty-seven, the goods, wares, and merchan- dize mentioned in schedule I, made part hereof, shall be exempt from duty; and entitled to free entry:

scHEDULE I.

All books, maps, charts, mathematical nauticle instruments, philosophical apparatus and all other articles whatever imported for the use of the United States; all philosophical apparatus, instruments, books, maps and charts, statues, statuary, busts and casts of marble, bronze, alabaster or plaster of paris, paintings and drawings, etchings, specimens of sculpture, cabinets of coins, medals, gems and all collections of antiquities; Provided, the same be specially imported in good faith for the use of any society incorporated or established for philosophical or literary purposes, or for the encouragement of the fine arts, or for the use or by the order of an college, academy, school, or seminary of learning in the United States; animal carbon (bone black); animals living of all kinds; argol, or crude tartar; articles in a crude state used in dyeing or tanning not otherwise provided for; bark, Peruvian ; bells, old, and bell metal; berries, nuts, flowers, plants and vegetables used exclusively in dyeing or in composing

vol. x1. PUB.—25

dyes, but no article shall be classed as such that has undergone any manufacture; bismuth ; bitter apples; bolting cloths; bones, burnt, and bone dust; books, maps and charts imported by authority of the joint library committee of Congress, for the use of the library of Congress; Provided, That if, in any case, a contract shall have been made with any bookseller, importer, or other person, for books, maps or charts, in which contract the bookseller, importer, or other person aforesaid, shall have paid the duty, or included the duty in said contract, in such case the duty shall not be remitted; brass, in bars and pigs, or when old and fit only to be remanufactured; brazil wood, braziletto, and all other dye woods in stuffs; bullion, gold and silver; burr stones, wrought or unwrought, but unmanufactured; cabinets of coins, medals, and all other collections of antiquities; coffee and tea when imported direct from the place of their growth or production in American vessels, or in foreign vessels entitled by reciprocal treaties to be exempt from discriminating duties, tonnage and other charges; coffee the growth or production of the possessions of the Netherlands, imported from the Netherlands in the same manner; coins, gold, silver and copper; copper ore; copper when imported for the United States mint; copper in pigs or bars, or when old and fit only to be remanufactured; cotton; cutch; dragon's blood; felt, adhesive for sheathing vessels; flax unmanufactured; garden seeds and all other seeds for agricultural, horticultural, medicinal and manufacturering purposes not otherwise provided for; glass, when old and fit only to be remanufactured; goods, wares and merchandize the growth, produce or manufacture of the United States, exported to a foreign country and brought back to the United States in the same condition as when exported upon which no drawback or bounty has been allowed: Provided, That all regulations to ascertain the identity thereof, prescribed by existing laws, or which may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury shall be complied with ; guano; household effects, old, and in use, of persons or families from foreign countries, if used abroad by them and not intended for any other person or persons, or for sale; Ioe; Ivory unmanufactured; junk, old; linseed—but not embracing flax seed; madder root; madder ground or prepared; maps and charts; models of inventions and other improvements in the arts; Provided, That no other article or articles shall be deemed a model or improvement which can be fitted for use; oakum; oil spermaceti, whale and other fish of American fisheries and all other articles the produce of such fisheries; paintings and statuary; palm leaf unmanufactured; personal and household effects, (not merchandize,) of citizens of the United States dying abroad; plaster of Paris or sulphate of lime unground; platina unmanufactured; rags of whatever material except wool; rattans and reads unmanufactured; sheathing copper, but no copper to be considered such, and admitted free, except in sheets of forty eight inches long and fourteen inches wide, and weighing from fourteen to thirty-four ounces the square foot; sheathing metal, not wholly, or in part of iron ungalvanized; shingle bolts and stave bolts; silk, raw, or as reeled from the cocoon, not being doubled, twisted, or advanced in manufacture in any way; specimens of natural history, mineralogy, or botany; substances expressly used for manures; tin in pigs, bars or blocks; trees, shrubs, bulbs, plants, and roots not otherwise provided for; wearing apparel in actual use and other personal effects, (not merchandize ;) professional books, implements, instruments, and tools of trade, occupation or employment, of persons arriving in the United States; Provided, That this exemption shall not be construed to include machinery, or other articles imported for use in any manufacturing establishment, or for sale; sheep's wool, unmanufactured of the value of twenty cents per pound or less at the port of exportation, and hair of the alpacca, the goat, and other like animals, unmanufactured; Provided, That any wool of the sheep, or hair of the alpacca, the goat, and other like animals,

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