Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

McKinnon, Naffziger, Parmelee, Parrish, Rathmann, Rhodes, Seybolt, Shook, Smith, Speice, Steinman, Stewart, Stout, Talbot, Tisdel, Tullis, Zimmerer and Mr. Speaker-39.

Mr. Horn having received the whole number of votes cast, was declared unanimously elected.

Mr. Tullis moved that the House proceed to the election of Pages ;
Which was agreed to.
Masters Townly and Merrill were put in nomination.

Those who voted for Masters Townly and Merrill were Messrs. Barnard, Blakely, Brewer, Brewster, Brush, Chase, Church, Crow, Evans, Fitchie, Fox, Furay, Gardner, Griffin, Hagood, Hoile, Hunt, Jones, Loveland, McCartney, McCaig, McKinnon, Naffziger, Parmelee, Parrish, Rathmann, Rhodes Seybolt, Shook, Smith, Speice, Steinman, Stewart, Stout, Talbot, Tisdel, Tullis, Zimmerer and Mr. Speaker-39.

Masters Townly and Merrill having received the whole number of votes cast, were declared unanimously elected.

Mr. McCartney moved that a committee of two be appointed to wait on the Secretary of State and request him to administer the oath of office to the officers of the House;

Which was agreed to.
Messrs. McCartney and Furay were appointed the committee.

The Secretary of State appeared and administered the oath of office to the Speaker and other officers of the House; which was signed by them as follows:

STATE OF NEBRASKA,

COUNTY OF LANCASTER. We, and each of us, do solemnly swear that we will support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of Nebraska, and faithfully discharge the duties of the office to which were severly chosen, to the best of our ability, so help us God.

Speaker-WM. McLANNAN,
Chief Clerk-John S. BOWEN.
Assistant Clerk-C. H. WALKER,
Enrolling Clerk-A. DEYO,
Engrossing Clerk-JESSE TURNER,
Sergeant-at-Arms—E. L. CLARK,
Doorkeeper-M. J. MUMFORD,
Fireman-C. C. COWLES,

R. H. TOWNLEY,
U. P. MERRILL.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Pages }E. F. MERRILL.

Mr. Seybolt moved that a committee os three be appointed to wait upon the Senate and inform them that the House is organized and ready to proceed to business;

Which was agreed to, and
Messrs. Seybolt, Griffin and Fitchie, were so appointed.

On motion of Mr. Stewart, at 4 o'clock and 30 minutes, P. M., the House adjourned till 10 o'clock to-morrow morning.

FRIDAY, January 8, 1869. Messrs. Reavis and Stephenson, a committee of the Senate appeared and informed the House that the Senate was duly organized and ready to proceed to business.

On motion of Mr. Parmelee, leave of absence was granted to Mr. Loveland till Tuesday afternoon next.

On motion of Mr. Shook, the members proceeded to select seats by delegations.

And, on motion of Mr. Hoile, a recess of ten minutes was taken for that purpose.

AFTER RECESS.

Mr. Griffin submitted the following resolution, which was read, considered and agreed to.

Resolved, That the rules of the House of Representatives as found on pages 89 to 96, inclusive of the journals of the third State session, be adopted as the rules of this House until otherwise ordered.

Mr. Gardner submitted the following resolution;
Which was read, considered and agreed to.

Resolved, That the Segeant-at-Arms be requested to procure a copy o the revised statutes for each member of the House.

Mr. Stewart moved that a committee of three be appointed to unite with a like committee of the Senate, and inform the Governor that the two

[ocr errors]

Houses are duly organized and ready to receive any communication which
he may be pleased to make;
Which was agreed to,

and
Messrs. Stewart, Fox and Gardner were appointed said committee.

Mr. Parmelee moved that the Sergeae-at-Arms be requested to furnish seats for the accommodation of the Senate when in joint convention; And it was so ordered. A message from the Senate by Mr. Chapman, their Secretary: MR. SPEAKER :-I am instructed to inform your honorable body that the Senate has appointed Messrs. Reavis, Goodwill and Barnum, a committee to confer with a like committee on the part of the House of Representatives, to inform his excellency, David Butler, Governor of the State of Nebraska, that both Houses of the Legislature have completed their organization, and that they are ready to receive any communication that he may be pleased to make to them.

The concurrence of your honorable body is earnestly desired.

Mr. Stewart, from the joint committee to wait upon the Governor, reported that the Governor will communicate his message to the two Houses at 2 o'clock this afternoon.

Mr. Gardner moved that a committee be appointed to wait upon the Senate and invite them to meet the House in joint session in the Hall of the House, at 2 o'clock P. M.

Which was agreed to, and
Messrs. Gardner, Stewart and Stout, were appointed said committee.
Mr. Seybolt submitted the following resolution,
Which was read, considered and agreed to:

Resolved, That the Secretary of State be instructed to furnish stationery for the use of the officers and members of this House, during the session.

Mr. Blakely submitted the following resolution ;
Which was read, considered and agreed to.

Resolved, That the Sergeant-at-Arms be directed to wait upon the Secretary of State and request him to furnish the members of this House with copies of the House Journal of the twelfth session.

Mr. Griffen submitted the following resolution ;
Which was read, considered and agreed to:

Resolved, That two hundred copies of the journal of the House be printed daily for the use of the members.

Mr. McCartney moved that a committee of three be appointed to enquire of the Secretary of State what arrangement have been made in regard to mail for members of the House;

Which was agreed to, and
Messrs. McCartney, Hagood and Crow, were so appointed.

On motion of Mr. Griffen, at 11 o'clock and 35 minutes, A. M., the House took a recess until 2 o'clock, P. M.

AFTER RECESS.

The Senate appearing, the House resolved itself into joint convention therewith.

JOINT CONVENTION.

The convention was called to order by the President of the Senate.
Mr. Reavis moved that a committee of two be appointed to wait upon

the Governor and inform him that the general assembly in joint convention is ready to receive any communication he may be pleased to make;

Which was agreed to, and
Messrs. Reavis and Parmelee were appointed said committee.

The committee appeared, escorting the Governor, who delivered the following message :

GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. .

as

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives :
In the name of the honorable body of legislators that preceded you, and

one of the executors of the will of the Representatives of the people upon whom devolved the task of putting in motion the machinery of State, I cordially welcome you to the new seat of Government.

Removed from its former location in obedience to the voice of the majority, but in opposition to the strongly expressed preferences of certain localities, the site of the Capital was fixed here, under circumstances that for a time made the success of the enterprise appear doubtful to its most arden supporters. But the passions and prejudices engendered by the bitterness of local controvesy and the heat of earnest debate, having passed away, the opposition to the measure has appeared to subside, and the Commissioners

have been able to carry out to a great extent the spirit of the law under which the town of Lincoln commenced its existence.

Located but little more than a year ago, you will of necessity find this a type of all new Western towns, and not by any mens free from the inconveniences.

Though deprived for the present of many of the means of entertainment that are found in older towns, which have facilities for more rapid communication, you will find the citizens of Lincoln to be a hospitable and generous people, vieing with each other during your brief stay, to make your sojourn among them agreeable and fruitful pleasant recollections.

With devout sentiments, I would express my gratitude to God for the continued manifestations of his goodness and mercy to us as a people. The continued prosperity which pervades every department of industry, the general health, the peace and quiet prevailing throughout the State, the social progress, and the religious blessings, which have been vouchsafed us, call forth grateful expressions and are subjects of unceasing congratulation,

You are assembled at this time, under the provision of the Constitution, in regular session. Previous assemblies have been called together for such specific action as became necessary, in the transition from a Territorial to a State Government, but since the State's admission into the Union, in no instance have they met in regular session. They have been confined to the consideration of specific subjects. Their action, for the most part, has been required to meet the exigencies of the time. Your action will be comparatively free from such restraints. From the nature of its subjects, its influence will be traced through the future history of this portion of the country. It falls upon you to determine the policy of the State highly important questions. That policy will

, in its turn, contribute largely to fix the future social, moral, industrial, financial and political character and standing of the State.

As individuals you have personal interests, as representatives of localities, you have neighborhood interests, but in your assembled capacity, under your oaths you become officers of the State. The citizen becomes a law giver. Personal and local interests sink in relative importance and should be subordinated to the interests of the whole community.

However important our personal or local interests may seem, we cannot take advantage of official position to secure them at the expense of the public at large. To do this would be to pervert a delegated power and would justly subject us to the reprobation of the present generation of posterity. I believe that you gentlemen, feel no less deeply impressed, than does the Executive, with the importance of these considerations.

upon several

« AnteriorContinuar »