Freedom and Organization, 1814-1914

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Psychology Press, 2001 - 528 páginas
'The purpose of this book is to trace the opposition and interaction of two main causes of change in the Nineteenth century: the belief in freedom which was common to Liberals and Radicals, and the necessity for organization which arose through industrial and scientific technique.' - Bertrand Russell
A revealing account by one of the twentieth century's greatest minds, charting the struggle between two determining forces in nineteenth century history: freedom and control.
Russell's text sweeps from the defeat of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna to the lead up to the First World War. It is full of lively portraits, including Malthus, Mill, Bentham and Marx. Russell examines the founding of democracy in America and the struggle with slavery, and brings to life the ideas of Jefferson, Jackson and Lincoln.

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Contenido

NAPOLEONS SUCCESSORS
13
THE CONGRESS OF VIENNA
27
THE HOLY ALLIANCE
43
THE TWILIGHT OF METTERNICH
56
The Social Background
65
THE ARISTOCRACY
67
COUNTRY LIFE
75
INDUSTRIAL LIFE
82
EARLY TRADE UNIONISM
196
MARX AND ENGELS
204
DIALECTICAL MATERIALISM
217
THE THEORY OF SURPLUS VALUE
231
THE POLITICS OF MARXISM
242
CHAPTER PAGE
259
THE SETTLEMENT OF THE WEST
274
COMPETITIVE CAPITALISM
341

The Philosophical Radicals
91
MALTHUS
93
BENTHAM
103
JAMES MILL
115
RICARDO
124
THE BENTHAMITE DOCTRINE
131
DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND
141
FREE TRADE
148
Socialism
171
OWEN AND EARLY BRITISH SOCIALISM
173
THE APPROACH TO MONOPOLY
357
THE PRINCIPLE OF NATIONALITY
389
BISMARCK AND GERMAN UNITY
417
GERMAN EMPIRE
434
IMPERIALISM
448
THE ARBITERS OF EUROPE
480
Conclusion
505
Bibliography
511
Index
517
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Bertrand Arthur William Russell (1872-1970) was a British philosopher, logician, essayist and social critic. He was best known for his work in mathematical logic and analytic philosophy. Together with G.E. Moore, Russell is generally recognized as one of the main founders of modern analytic philosophy. Together with Kurt Gödel, he is regularly credited with being one of the most important logicians of the twentieth century. Over the course of a long career, Russell also made contributions to a broad range of subjects, including the history of ideas, ethics, political and educational theory, and religious studies. General readers have benefited from his many popular writings on a wide variety of topics. After a life marked by controversy--including dismissals from both Trinity College, Cambridge, and City College, New York--Russell was awarded the Order of Merit in 1949 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. Noted also for his many spirited anti-nuclear protests and for his campaign against western involvement in the Vietnam War, Russell remained a prominent public figure until his death at the age of 97.

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