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wife of the above-mentioned Jacobus Hamilton de Mulcaster was the first head master of Merchant Taylors' Dalzell. was granddaughter of her husband's School. He was in favour with Elizabeth, who accepted brother, Sir John Hamilton of Orbiestoun.

the dedication of his volume. He was the master of

Spenser, and was in “relations" with Sir Philip Sydney The Scots Magazine, vol. lxxxiv., contains the

and Shakspeare. It has even been suggested, though following obituary notice, " At Barachny, Nov. 13, Mr. Quick does not quite accept the view, that Shak. 1822, William Hamilton, Esq. He was the last spears had Mulcaster in view when he depicted Holorepresentative of the ancient family of Monkland." | feraes. When Armado says ('Love's Labour's Lost' V. ii.)

SIGMA.

“I protest the schoolmaster is exceeding fantastical; too, too vain; too, too vain," he uses a common expression of

Mulcaster. Our worthy is, indeed, as he confesses, not faiscellaneous

always very easy of comprehension. He speaks of his

own“ 80 careful, I will not say 80 curious, writing," and NOTES ON BOOKS, &o.

he adds, with a frankness of confession that is well justi. A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare. Edited by fied, and must have been good for the soul, “ Even some Horace Howard Furness, Ph.D., LL.D., L.H.D.-Vol. of reasonable study can hardly understand the couching VII. The Merchant of Venice.' (Philadelphia, J. B. of my sentence and the depth of my conceit.” Mr. Lippincott Company.)

Quick treats him as the equal of Ascham, points to the new The successive volumes of the American Variorum Shake- features he introduced into education and the general speare appear with what, under the conditions, must be breadth of his views, and likens him to Montaigne. He called exemplary punctuality. Regarded as the work

ality Regarded as the work should go further back, Rabelais alone among Renaispractically of one man, a portion of whose time is | sance thinkers excogitated a great scheme of education Decessarily occupied with professorial duties, these for the mind and the body, and there are few subsequent volumes strike us with amazement. None of the six teachers, from Montaigne to Mulcaster, and from him to plays for which Dr. Furness is responsible involves so Rousseau and Locke, who have not owed much to the much labour as the 'Hamlet,' which extended over two famous author of Pantagruel.' Mr, Quick bas done volumes. The present work, however, includes close good service in reprinting this curious and, in a sense, upon five hundred pages, and contains everything con- important work, the first edition of which appeared in Dected with The Merchant of Venice' that the student 1581. The work does not appeal to a large section of or the actor can seek to know. For the text the First readers, but those to whom it does appeal will give it a

which Dr. Furness is at some paing to show is warm welcome. practically the same as the second quarto, has been selected as the basis. The various readings of the other The Catharines of History. By Henry J. Swallow. three folios, the four quartos, and the subsequent editors (Stock.) are given beneath the text, and lower still, in footnotes, | John CAPGRAVE, the chronicler, wrote a book, which appear the suggestions and emendations of various was issued several years ago in the Rolls Series, called commentators, from Rowe to Dr. Furness. Equally | Liber de Illustribus Henricis.' The thread which consbrewd, sensible, and scholarly are the notes of the nects his biograpbies together is the fact that every one latest editor, and much interesting information, de- of the people concerning whom he discourses was called rived from various sources, is supplied. Let a reader Henry. Mr. Swallow has perhaps heard of this, and so who wishes to test this see the comments of a class of determined to do for women called Catharine what Cap. young women upon the speech of Portia to Bassanio be grave did for his Henries. He has produced a book fore he opens the casket (Act III. sc. ii.). In the ap- almost the opposite of that which we have suggested pendix, which constitutes little less than half the volume, may have been his model. The chronicler has preserved à mass of invaluable information is given. Those who for us many facts which, but for his zeal, would have bave followed the American Variorum Shakespeare know been forgotten, Mr. Swallow has recorded nothing how exhaustive such information is, and are also aware which was not to be found told much better elsewhere. how largely N. & Q.' has contributed to it. It can scarcely

d to it. It can scarcely of what service it can be to jumble together in one book be given to one man to finish a task such as that on ill-considered lives of St. Catherine of Sienna, Catherine which Dr. Furness is occupied, and juvenile indeed must von Bora, the wife of Martin Luther, Catherine of be the reader of N. & Q.' who hopes to see the perfected Russia, and Cutherine Howard, we cannot imagine. To work. It is, however, to be hoped that many more criticize such a book seriously would be a waste of time, volumes will receive Dr. Furness's scholarly and intelli. space, and temper. As a specimen of Mr. Swallow's gent supervision. Scholarship is necessarily the chief qualifications to give instruction, we may mention that cbaracteristic in these works. With so much that is he tells us that the letter K “only came from Germany graceful, genial, and human is it accompanied, that the with the printing press.” If our readers will consult notes signed by the editor can in a moment be distin. the index to Domesday, or, for the matter of that, any guished. That this is the edition of Sbakspeare is con- mediæval book of a later date than the Norman Confessed. It is pleasant to see the row of goodly volumes quest that has been properly printed, they will know extending upon the shelves, and to know that one more what to think of this statement. Mr. Morris's Speci. play is in the hands of the student in the best obtainable mens of Early English' is not an uncommon or a costly shape. There is something to be said in favour of a volume. It would have been well for Mr. Swallow to Shakspeare without note or comment of any kind. If have looked at the glossary appended thereto ere he notes are, however, necessary-and most find the need of made history after this fashion out of his own inner them-they are here in excelsis.

consciousness. It seems even still necessary to tell some

people that knowledge of the older forms of English Positions. By Richard Mulcaster. With some Account does not come by the light of nature, and that if people of his Life and Writings by Robert Herbert Quick. who are quite ignorant of it will force themselves into (Longmans & Co.)

the position of instructors, they must be content with Ix the very interesting account of this forgotten worthy, being told that they render themselves ridiculous. Aninterest in whom he has sought to revive, Mr. Quick other of Mr. Swallow's blunders has a personal interest gives Mulcaster strong claims upon our appreciation. to us, as it briugs back to our memory one of the most

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comical mistakes ever made in our hearing. In the given us in full. They would have borne more annotajuttings about poor Catherine Howard Henry VIII, istion than Sir John Maclean has felt justified in giving quoted as gpeaking of the “many strange accidents that them. The banner cloths of “Satten Abridges" at Beghave befallen my marriages," and Mr. Swallow prints worth were made of satin from Bruges. The supple"accidents" in italics, conceiving, as we surmise, that mentary documents in the appendix are all of value. the king used the term in its modern sense as we meet | We have a list of the plundered chantries in Gloucester, with it in the newspapers. Had he done so, considering and of the lead taken from several of the religious the circumstances connected with his previous marriages, houses. For these we are grateful. Every collection of the effect would certainly have been irresistibly comic. facts of this kind is an additional stone to the pyramid, Henry was, however, a man who knew the meaning of Until we get together all these details it will be imwords, and gave those about him credit for an equal possible for us to see the great changes of the sixteenth amount of penetration. He meant by accidents not century as they affected the men who lived through that mischances, but properties or attributes not of the long period of revolution, essence of the thing in itself. No one at the time could

In the Universal Review Mr. Ford Madox Brown possibly mistake his meaning, for the air was heavy with theological strife regarding the nature of the holy

writes on Historic Art,' and complains of the persistent Eucharist, and the words "accident” and “substance"

* refusal of England-alone, perhaps, among European were bandied to and fro as “boycott" and "plan of cam

nations-of" recognition and aid to the fine arts." Mrs. paign" are now. We really should not have thought it

Lynn Linton writes boldly on The Philosophy of Marworth while to mention this had it not given us an

riage,' Mr. W. L. Courtney supplies 'The Agnostic in

Fiction, and Mr. W. L. Thomas a good account of The opportunity of relating bow the misunderstanding of a

Making of the Graphic.' The very numerous illustrawell-known term may lead to strange mistakes. Our readers must go back more than five-and-thirty years.

tions include reproductions from Messrs. Herkomer,

Luke Fildes, and Sir James Linton. They must picture for themselves a woodside on a raw December morning. Hounds are drawing the covert with little hope of finding a fox, and men of all ranks and conditions are cbatting “de omnibus rebus." It was in

Notices to Correspondents. the days when the dispute between Mr, Gorham and the We must call special attention to the following notices : Bishop of Exeter filled the popular mind, and when On all communications must be written the name and minute points of theology were not only discussed by the address of the sender, not necessarily for publication, but religious newspapers, but overflowed into the secular

the secular as a guarantee of good faith. press, and when discussions on the most sacred matters

We cannot undertake to answer queries privately. of religion came in odd juxtaposition with the price of

To secure insertion of communications correspondents horned cattle, accounts of prize fights, and the last new

must observe the following rule. Let each note, query, thingin swindling. A young man of great intellectualattain. ments and no little vanity had been for some time talk.

l or reply be written on a separate elip of paper, with the

signature of the writer and such address as he wishes to ing to a friend on some of the deepest questions included

appear. Correspondents who repeat queries are requested in the cause then before the Privy Council, when a man wbose tastes were merely for sport came up to him, and

ad to head the second communication "Duplicate." poured out a string of observations concerning hounds, WESTMINSTER LIBRARY (7th S. ii. 447).-MR. J. DYKES horses, foxes, and the prospective state of the weather. | CAMPBELL is anxious to direct attention to his unangwered The vain young man gave only half attention, and at last query at this reference as to how long this library lasted irritated his companion so much that he said in a pet, and what became of its collection. It is mentioned in “I see, Tom, you don't care a d— for the hunting the 'Picture for London,' 1815. now." "Yes I do, Jack," was the reply. “Hunting

Rexus.-1. (“Pightle"). Phillips, in his New World would be all very well if it were not for its accidents

of Words,' has “ Pigle or Pightel, a small Parcel of -the "accidents” meant in this case being intrusive folk | Land enclosed with a Hedge, which in some parts of of the mental calibre of Jack. Jack did not see this. Engl

see this. England is commonly called a Pingle," See 1st S. üi. 391. He was a dull person, whose intellectual horizon was A

as A long note on the subject, signed J. A. Pn., appears 2nd bounded by his family, his game, and his hunters. He s. ix. 490. 2. (“Springs as applied to Fields and went his way, and told the field that Tom bad on a sud

Woods"). Does not this refer to the fact that there was den turned a coward, and was afraid of breaking his

at some time a spring, or springs, of water? neck. As a matter of course, he was covered with ridicule, for Tom had the well-earned reputation of

UNCERTAIN (* Pronunciation of Valet ").—Like many being the most reckless rider after hounds ever seen in other words of French origin (e.g., piquet), valet has been the two hunting countries which he favoured by his incorporated into the English language, and it is a matter presence.

of taste, or perhaps of sentiment, whether the French or We have received from Sir John Maclean The Manor

English pronunciation is accepted. of Tockington and the Roman Villa, and Inventories of

M. H, R. ("Spiflicate ").-Anticipated. See p. 115. and Receipts for Church Goods in the County of Gloucester Very many similar replies were received. and Cities of Gloucester and Bristol, reprinted from the DRAWOH ("A Queer Inscription").-Anticipated. See Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archæo. 17th S. v. 472. logical Society. Nothing written by the editor of Smyth's

CORRIGENDUM.-P. 190, col. i. 1. 36, for “os” read æs. Lives of the Berkeleys can be in need of praise from us. We may, however, be permitted to say briefly tbat

NOTICE. the manorial

n is worked out in a Editorial Communications should be addregsed to “The careful manner that leaves nothing to be desired. The Editor of Notes and Queries'"-Advertisements and pedigrees of the families of Poyntz of Cory Malet and Business Letters to “ The Publisher"-at the Office, 22, Iron Acton are very elaborate, and, so far as we are able Took's Court, Cursitor Street, Chancery Lane, E.C. to test them, singularly accurate. The inventories of We beg leave to state that we decline to return com. Gloucestershire church goods taken in the reign of Ed-munications which, for any reason, we do not print; and word VI. are valuable. We are very glad to have them to this rule we can make no exception,

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