The Juvenile Plutarch:: Containing Accounts of the Lives of Celebrated Children, and of the Infancy of Persons who Have Been Illustrious for Their Virtues Or Talents. With Plates..

Portada
Tabart and Company at the Juvenile Library, 157, New Bond Street., 1806 - 204 páginas
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 89 - Mantua testified their esteem by a public mourning, the contemporary wits were profuse of their encomiums, and the palaces of Italy were adorned with pictures, representing him on horseback with a lance in one hand and a book in the other.
Página 177 - Of toys terrestrial, she can rove at large ; There, freely can respire, dilate, extend, In full proportion let loose all her powers ; And, undeluded, grasp at something great.
Página 111 - Begin, be bold, and venture to be wise: He, who defers this work from day to day, Does on a river's bank expecting stay Till the whole stream that stopp'd him shall be gone, Which runs, and as it runs, for ever shall run on.
Página 175 - Thus perished, at the age of twelve years and some months, this hopeful young sailor, who so well deserved a better fate. When we reflect on the generous action which he performed, in saving the life of his father, and of a girl who was a stranger to him, at the expense of his own, we are surely entitled to place his name in the very first rank of heroes. But the deed was not alone glorious from its immediate consequences. As an example, it survives to the most distant ages.
Página 107 - Queen ; in which he very early took delight to read, till by feeling the charms of verse, he became, as he relates, irrecoverably a poet. Such are the accidents which, sometimes remembered, and perhaps sometimes forgotten, produce that particular designation of mind, and propensity for some certain science or employment, which is commonly called Genius. The true Genius is a mind of large general powers, accidentally determined to some particular direction.
Página 106 - Fairy Queen; in which he very early took delight to read, till by feeling the charms of verse, he became, as he relates, irrecoverably a poet. Such are the accidents which, sometimes remembered, and perhaps sometimes forgotten, produce that particular designation of mind, and propensity for some certain science or employment, which is commonly called genius.
Página 172 - ... to his breast, Beckner perceived at a distance a shark advancing directly towards him. He called out for assistance. The danger was pressing. Every one ran on deck, but no one dared to go farther ; they contented themselves with firing off several muskets, with little effect ; and the animal, lashing the sea with his tail, and opening his frightful jaws, was just about to seize his prey. In this terrible extremity, what strong men would not venture to attempt, filial piety excited a child to...
Página 39 - He was the son of Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, under Elizabeth...
Página 113 - Baratier. 113 account of his being a protestatut, at the time of the revocation of the edict of Nantes. He was a man of great piety and learning, and undertook himself the education of his son, who made so...
Página 37 - Wisdom's ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace." He was also very assiduous and zealous to do good. Till his time, the condition of the poor in London was very deplorable ; and it was much worse after the dissolution of the monasteries, in many of which the sick, infirm, and destitute, found comfort and relief. Bishop Ridley, who was burnt in the succeeding reign, happening to preach before the king, dwelt very pathetically, in his sermon, upon the duty of charity, and recommended...

Información bibliográfica