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THE ROMAN CALENDAR. (See Adam's Rom. Antiq. pp. 330, 331.)

Days of the Month

April, June,

March, May, July, October

Sepi. Nov.

February.

iv. {nco adje ante

Kalendæ. vi. V. iv.

Kalenda.
iv.

iii. Pridie Non.

Nonæ.
viii.
vii.
vi.

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viii.kid.)

Pridie Non.

None.
viii.
vii.

iv.

vin

iv. iii. Pridie Id. Idus.

.

(se, die

1 Kalendæ.
2

)
3 iii.
4 Pridie Non.
5

Nona.
6

Ssc. die ante 7

vii. 8 vi. 9 V. 10 Iljii. 121 Pridie Id.. 13 Idus. 14 xviii: ante ka. 15 xvii. 16 xvi. 17 XV, 18 xiv. 19 xiii. 20 xii. 21 xi. 22

X.

mens.scq)

23

Ixxiy

Jan. August,
December 1

V
iv.

Kalenda.
iv.
iii.
Pridie Non.
Nonæ.
viii.
vii. 9
vi.
V : :
iv., .,
iii.
Pridie Id.
Idus.
xix.

ik
xviii.
xvii.
xvi.
XV.
xiy.
xili,
xii.
xi.
X.
ix.
viii.

ix. 24 viii. 25

vii. 26

vi. 27 v. 28

iv. 29

iii.
30 Pridie Kal. niens.seq.
31

Pridie Id.
Idus.
xvii.
xvi.
XV.
xiv.
xiii.
xii.
xi.
X.
ix.
viii.
vii.
vi.

XV.
xiv.
xili.
xii.
xi.
X.
ix.
viii.
vii.
vi.

vii.

iv.
iii.
Pridic Kal.

vi.
V.
iv.
iii.
Pridie Kal.

iv.
iii.
Pridie Kal.

* This was reduplicated in a leap-year, both the 24th and 25th days of February being denominated sexto Kalendas Martias, whence the name • Bissextile.'

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The Values and Proportions of GRECIAN COINS.

s. d. q.
0 0 0

1.

Lepton

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. The values of the diobolus, tetrobolus, didrachmon (which, as well as the drachma, was generally of silver) tetradrachmon, &c. are easily ascertained from their etymology. See Harwood's Grecian Antiquities, pp. 459-461; and fer the Roman modes of computation of money, and of interest (as also of weights, and measures) see Adam's Roman Antiquities, pp. 495--500, where are given many curious particulars of individual opulence; and the accurate Tables annexed to Ainsworth's Latin dictionary.

The Values and Proportions of ROMAN COINS,

1. s. d. q. Teruncius, or Quadrans

0 0 0 24

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1000

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+ The smallest of the brass coins after the reduction of the as, as the sestertius was of the silver ones. The as, at first lilralis (or a pound weight) after it's such cessive reductions to 2 oz., 1 oz., and ļoz., was still called libelia. It was applied to any thing divided into twelve parts; an inheritance, an acre, liquid measure, interest of money, &c. Hence probably our word 'ace' or unit. The quinarius was called victoriutus, from the image of Victory sometimes impressed upon it. # Meaning libella, libella, et semis, and often marked HS.

The comparative values of gold and silver have in all states occasionally varied. As the stater (of gold) weighed generally double the denarius, they are here stated, below the present proportion, gold : silver :: 25:2. The stater aureus of the Greeks is estimated at the same value. The stater Daricus and the stater Cresi were double.

1

1xxvi

Grecian and Roman Weights reduced to English Troy Weight.

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Originally an as. The mina Attica conimunis exceeds this, according to Dr. Arbuthnot, only by t, and weighs

0 11 16 The Talentum Atticum commune,

60 Minæ, 56 11 0 171 Ainsworth, indeed, states the Attic weights as I heavier than the corresponding Roman ones.

N. B. Between the obolus and the drachnia was interposed the scriptulum double the former ; between the drachma and the sicilicus the sextula = 4 scriptula; and between the sicilicus and the uncia the duella, = one third of the latter. There were also other subdivisions of weights, the senuncia, hemisescla, i.e. senisextuln, &c. But they are omitted in the Table, for the sake of brevity. The weights of the Grecian coins are computed,

The Drachma at

0 0
The Mina (100dr.) i 0 4
The Talent (60m) 65.0 12

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1

Grecian Measures of Length. 1

ods. ft. ittch, dec.
0 0 0.7554 1

Dactylus

Doron

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* Between the doron and the spithane was interposed the lichas ten, and the orthodoron = eleven dactyli. Between the pes likewise and the inxus, or larger cubit, occurred the surrean = three-fourths, and the nvybuy five-sixths of the

The Greeks and Persians called thirty stadia a parasanga, and two parasange a schenos.

πηχυς.

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80,000 60,000 20,000 5,000 3,333 1,000 8 Milliare 1611 %

Grecian Measures of Capacity for things Liquid, reduced to English

Wine-Measure.

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* Between the cochlearion and the mystron was interposed the cheme, equal to two cochlearia; and between the eyathus and cotyle (the former of which Dr. Langhorne, by mistake, represents as nearly triple, instead of one-sixth of the latter) the oxybaphon, which was equal to four cotyla. Dr. L. likewise, in his mingled Table of Greek and Roman measures of length, has stated the English pace there used at five feet; whereas, in what relates to the Grecian part, it must be estimated at six,

Roman Measures of Capacity for things Liquid, reduced to English

Wine-Measure.

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* Between thc cyathus and the hemina were interposed the acetabulum = onefourth, and the quartarius = one half the latter : so called, because . sexturius; as sextarius, because { congius. Cadus, congiarius, and dolium denote no certain

The Romans divided the sextarius, as well as the libra, into twelve equal parts, called: cyathi. Hence their calices were denominated sextantes, quadrantes, or trientes, according to the number of cyathi which they contained.

measure.

Grecian Measures of Capacity for things Dry, reduced to English

Corn Measure.

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8,640

8,64

576

144

72

48 Medimnus

DO 6 3.501

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