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Armstrong.
Heron,
Hall.
Hennessy.
Doherty
Denise.
Steele.
Armstrong.
Hennessy.
Heron.
Doherty.
Denise.
Armstrong.
Hennessy.
Steele.

Rieve. Livingston. Minton. Beirne. Beirne. Minton.

Walker.
Livingston.
Beirne.

Steele.
Doherty.
Armstrong.
Hennessy.
Armstrong.
Hennessy
Doherty.

Beirne.
Brophy.
Livingstone.
Walker.

Mar. 12, 1952. Panel report.

Feinsinger. p. m.

Panel members: Shulman, Bullen.

Seward, Bane, Oliver, Mills, Aaron.
Campo.

Dunlop.
Mar. 13, 1952. General discussion.

Feinsinger. a. m.

Panel members: Shulman, Bullen.

Seward, Bane, Oliver, Mills, Ross.

Campo.
P. m.

Bullen.
Panel members: Shulman,

Seward, Bane, Oliver, Mills,

Campo.
Mar. 15, 1952 Discussion of matters which could Bullen.
8. m.
be returned to parties.

Dunlop.
Panel members: Shulman,

Seward, Bane, Oliver, Mills,

Campo.
P. m.

Feinsinger.
Panel members: Shulman, Aaron,

Seward, Bane, Oliver, Mills, Bullen,
Campo.

Dunlop.
Mar. 16, 1952 Various issues.

Feinsinger. 8. m. and Panel members: Shulman, Bullen. p. m.

Seward, Bane, Oliver, Mills, Dunlop.

Campo.
Mar. 19, 1952 | Discussion and voting...

Feinsinger. p. m.

1 Panel members: Shulman, Bullen.

Seward, Bane, Oliver, Mills, Aaron.
Campo.

Dunlop.
Ross.

Coman,
Mar. 20, 1952 Voting..

Feinsinger.
Bullen,
Aaron.
Dunlop.
Coman.
Ross.

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p. m,

Armstrong
Heron.
Olander.
Hennessy.
Denise.

1 During this session the Board was recessed and reconvened in executive session. were not present in the executive session.

Panel members

(Reference to the following will be found on p. 1990.)

WAGE STABILIZATION BOARD

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF BOARD MEMBERS AS OF APRIL 22, 1952 Public members

Nathan P. Feinsinger, Chairman, is a professor of law at the University of Wisconsin. He was in Washington with the National War Labor Board from 1942 until 1946, successively as associate general counsel, oirector of national disputes, and public member of tne Board. In 1946, he was Chairman of the

Presidential Fact-Finding Board in the steel dispute, and performed the same job in the meat-packing dispute in 1948. In 1947, he was the special representative of the Secretary of Labor in labor disputes in the longshore, public utilities, and Hawaiian sugar and pineapple industries.

Mr. Feinsinger has often served as arbitrator, umpire, or impartial chairman under collective-bargaining contracts, including those of General Motors and the United Auto Workers, CIO; Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co. and the UAW; Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co. and the UAW; and Consolidated-Vultee and the International Association of Machinists, AFL.

Mr. Feinsinger graduated from and received a doctorate of jurisprudence from the University of Michigan in 1928, after which he spent a year doing sociolegal research at Columbia Law School. He has been a member of the faculty at Wisconsin since 1929, and has also taught as a visiting professor at the University of Michigan and the University of Chicago. He is the author of three books in the field of law.

Frederick H. Bullen, Vice Chairman on leave from his job as Executive Secretary of the New York State Mediation Board, was chairman of the Cleveland Regional War Labor Board in 1944-45. He was appointed a special mediation officer of the National War Labor Board in early 1942, and during that summer operated as special mediation officer in the Cleveland area. He became the disputes director of the regional board before moving up as regional chairman. For a short time in 1950 he was impartial arbitrator for the Ford Motor Co. and the UAW.

He is a graduate of Cornell University. Studied at Graduate School of Public Administration, Harvard University. He is a lecturer at the Graduate School for Public Service, New York University.

John T. Dunlop, professor of economics at the Littauer School of Public Administration, Harvard University, was Vice Chairman of the Boston Regional War Labor Board, and later Chief of the Program Appraisal and Research Division of the National War Labor Board in Washington during World War II. He was later a public member of the Wage Adjustment Board for the building and construction industry. Since the end of the war, Mr. Dunlop has been a consultant to the Council of Economic Advisers and to Presidential Assistant, John R. Steelman, as well as impartial chairman of the National Joint Board for the Settlement of Jurisdictional Disputes in the Building and Construction Industry. He is a member of the Atomic Energy Labor Relations Panel,

He received both his A.B. degree and his Ph.D. from the University of California. He also studied at Stanford and at Cambridge Universit", in England.

Benjamin Aaron is on leave from the University of California at Los Angeles where he has served as lecturer in labor law and research associate in the Institute of Industrial Relations since 1946. During the war, Mr. Aaron held the post of mediation officer for the National War Labor Board until his appointment as chairman of the Detroit Area Tool and Die Commission in 1943. In 1944 he was appointed chairman of the National Airframe Panel, and in 1945 he was made Executive Director of the Board. He also served as a member of the War Department's Advisory Committee on Lahor for Japan in 1946.

From 1946 until his appointment to the Wage Stabilization Board, Mr. Aaron, in addition to his regular work at the University, served as umpire and member of Government fact-finding boards in numerous labor disputes. From July 1950 to July 1951, he served as impartial arbitrator for the B. È. Goodrich Co. and the United Rubber Workers (CIO).

Mr. Aaron received an A. B. from the University of Michigan, an LL. B. from the Harvard Law School, and did graduate research in labor law at the University of Chicago Law School.

Thomas F. Coman has been a labor relations analyst and reporter for the Bureau of National Affairs since 1941. Prior to that time he had been with the Associated Press in Detroit and Washington since 1934, also specializing in writing about various phases of labor relations.

Mr. Coman graduated with an A.B. in journalism from Notre Dame University in 1924, and worked for a South Bend newspaper for 10 years before joining the Associated Press.

Arthur M. Ross is on leave from the University of California at Berkeley where he is Associate Professor of Industrial Relations. He is an experienced arbitrator of management-labor disputes in the airframe, automobile, machinery, airline, electrical, and other industries. Among the companies where he has served as arbitrator are: Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corp., Pan-American World Airways, Dow Chemical Co., Kuhlman Electric Co., Master Electric Co., and California Cotton Mills. In 1949–50 he served as assistant umpire under the National

Agreement between the General Motors Corp. and the UAW-CIO. During World War II he was associated with the National War Labor Board as Chairman of the New Case Committee and Vice Chairman of the War Shipping Panel.

Mr. Ross has been consultant to the California State Employment Commission, the Institute of International Education, and other agencies. He is author of books and articles on wages, collective bargaining, and industrial disputes, and has taught at Michigan State College and George Washington University as well as the University of California. Industry members

Hiram S. Hall is vice president in charge of personnel functions of the BigelowSanford Carpet Co. of New York City, where he has been since 1944. Before coming to the Bigelow-Sanford Co., Mr. Hall was the director of industrial relations at Ranger Engine & Aircraft Co., Farmingsdale, N. Y. He previously had been manager of operations for Aircraft Radio Corp., and director and manager of the Queens Industrial Commission. He has been an instructor of labor law and collective bargaining techniques at New York University.

Mr. Hall served with the United States Navy from 1917 until 1919 and received a law degree from Southern Law School, Athens, Ga.

Milton M. Olander, a member of the labor relations committee of the United States Chamber of Commerce, has been director of industrial relations at the Owens-Illinois Glass Co., of Toledo, Ohio, since 1935. He has also been a member of United States delegations to International Labor Organization meetings in Paris, Mexico City, and Montreal. He also served as district representative for the training-within-industry program for the State of Michigan and the Toledo, Ohio, area from 1940–44. From 1922–24, Mr. Olander was football coach at Western Michigan College, in Kalamazoo, Mich., and from 1924 to 1935 he was assistant football coach and professor at the University of Illinois.

Mr. Olander graduated from the University of Illinois in 1922, and received a master's degree from Michigan in 1931.

George W. Armstrong, Jr. is president of the Texas Steel Co., whose employ he entered in 1923. He is also president of Trinity Oxygen Co., director of the Wichita Falls & Wellington Railroad, a subsidiary of the M. K. T. Railroad, and is in the cattle business in Montague County, Tex. In 1922 and 1923, before going to Texas Steel, he was employed at Donner Steel Co., Universal Atlas Steel Co., and the Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp. During World War II, he served as one of the vice chairmen of Industry Members of the Eighth Regional War Labor Board, in Dallas.

Mr. Armstrong was educated in the public schools at Fort Worth, Tex. He attended Carnegie Institute of Technology.

Richard P. Doherty has been director of the employee-employer relations department of the National Association of Broadcasters since September 1946. Before that he spent 5 years as executive director of the Industrial Relations Council of Metropolitan Boston, which he helped to organize in 1941. In addition, Mr. Doherty had been head of the economics department of the Boston University College of Business Administration, the faculty of which he had joined in 1927. He has had widespread experience in labor-management mediation, conciliation, and arbitration matters since NRA days.

Mr. Doherty graduated from Clark University in 1925 and received a master's degree from Brown University in 1926.

Malcolm L. Denise joined the office of the general counsel of the Ford Motor Co. on June 3, 1946, and is now an associate counsel for the company specializing in labor law and related matters. Before going to Ford, he practiced general civil law in Detroit, concentrating on labor law beginning in 1942.

Mr. Denise attended college and received his law degree at the University of Michigan.

Dwight Steele is president of the Hawaii Employer's Council. Previously, he had been employed by the Distributors Association of Northern California since 1942, as a labor relations specialist and, beginning in 1944, as executive vice president. Before that, he had practiced law in California, having been admitted to the bar in 1939.

He studied law at Bolt Hall at the University of California.

Alternate industry member

Hoey A. Hennessey is an industry member of the Review and Appeals Committee of the Board. He held the same position during World War II and was also an alternate industry member of the WLB. He is assistant to the managing director of the National Association of Manufacturers in New York City. From 1945 until 1950 he was employed by the National Industrial Council in New York City. For many years prior to that he was manager of the Carteret Industrial Association of Carteret, N. J. Labor members

Harry C. Bates has been president of the Bricklayers, Masons, and Plasterers International Union (AFL) since 1936. He has also been a member of the executive council of the AFL since 1934. During the war, he was a labor member of the Wage Adjustment Board for the Building and Construction Industry, both under the National War Labor Board and the National Wage Stabilization Board. He entered the trade as a bricklayer in Waco, Tex., in 1900, became a vice president of the international union in 1920, and was the treasurer from 1924 to 1928.

Elmer E. Walker, a general vice president of the International Association of Machinists since 1945, was appointed a substitute 'A. F. of L. member of the National War Labor Board in 1944. He has been a machinist since 1918, and, until 1933, was a working tool and die maker in various places in the Midwest. He has been a union official since that time. During the war, Mr. Walker served in various posts with the Government, including periods as national field representative of the apprenticeship service in the tool and die industry, special assistant to WPB Assistant Director Joseph D. Keenan, Director of the Office of Labor Consultants of the Smaller War Plants Corporation, and held memberships on various commissions. He is now resident vice president of the IAM.

William C. Birthright is president of the Journeyman Barbers, Hairdressers, and Cosmetologists International Union of America, and sixth ranking vice president of the A. F. of L. He has been a member of the A. F. of L. since 1908 and lives in Indianapolis, Ind. During the war, Mr. Birthright was chairman of the Marion County, Ind., County Draft Board, and he also served as a member and chairman of the Indiana State Personnel Board for 4 years. Earlier, he was secretary of the Tennessee Federation of Labor for 15 years.

Emil Rieve, who has been president of the Textile Workers Union of America since 1939, was an alternate labor member of the National War Labor Board during World War II and also a labor delegate to the President's Labor-Management Conference in 1945. He was president of the American Federation of Hosiery Workers from 1929 to 1939 and labor representative to the Code Authority for the Hosiery Industry in 1933 to 1935. He was also a member of Governor Lehman's special committee on the State Defense Council, and a labor advisory committeeman to the Council on National Defense. He has also been an alternate member of the National Mediation Board and a member of the United States Government Wage and Hour Commission. He as a United States Labor Representative to the International Labor Office in Geneva in 1936.

Benjamin Sigal has practiced labor law in Washington since 1946. He is general counsel to several CIO unions, including the International Union of Electrical Workers, and the United Gas, Coke, and Chemical Workers. During World War II, he served as executive assistant to the CIO members of the National War Labor Board and held the same position with the National Wage Stabilization Board through May of 1946. Until this time, Mr. Sigal had been engaged in a private law practice in Pittsburgh.

He graduated from the University of Pittsburgh and received his law degree from Harvard

Joseph Childs is vice president of the United Rubber Workers of America (CIO) and also a member of the CIO executive board. He is a member of the city finance committee of Akron, Ohio, and is active in civic affairs in Akron. He was formerly a labor member of the Cleveland regional WSB. He also served during World War II as an alternate labor member of the National War Labor Board.

Alternate labor members.

Lee W. Minton is president of the Glass Bottle Blowers Association, AFL. He is chairman of the shorter work day committee, and serves on a number of other AFL committees. In addition, he has represented the AFL in various capacities; he was a delegate to the International Trade Conference in 1947 and 1948, a member of the Anglo-American Council on Produetivity in 1948, and is a member of the board of directors of the Community Chest Councils. In 1951, he was elected vice-president of the American Federation of the Physically Handicapped.

John Brophy was for many years district officer of the United Mine Workers of America. From 1938 until 1950, he was director of Industrial Union Councils of the national CIO. During this time, he also held the following positions: member of tne National War Labor Board, member of the President's Committee on Fair Employment Practices, United States adviser to the Paris meeting of the International Labor Organization, and a consultant to the State Department at the Habana conference on international relations. In 1950 and 1951 he was s CIO meinber of the International Committee for Trade Unionism, which serves in an advisory capacity to the United Nations.

(Reference to the following will be found on p. 2037.)

I. DEFINITIONS

A. CLOSED SHOP

Under the “closed shop" form of union security, the company obligates itself to hire and retain in its employ union members only. “Closed shop' has been defined to include recruitment by or through the union or the requirement that all new employees be members at the time of employment. The agreement may provide that the employer may reject a worker, referred to him by the union, who does not meet the specific standards set by the employer or the contract. Under an absolute union-hiring clause or a preferential union-hiring clause, if the union fails to furnish the necessary workers, agreements usually permit the employer to hire non union workers provided they make application for membership or secure a temporary work card prior to or at the commencement of employment. When an agreement establishes the closed shop for the first time, employees are required to become members of the union within a short time after the signing of the agreement. In rare instances an exception is made of workers already in the employ of the company at the time the closed-shop agreement is signed, who need not become union members.

B. UNION SHOP The union shop differs from the closed shop in that the employer is free to hire nonunion workers and is the sole judge of the qualifications of the applicants. Unlike the closed shop also, union membership need not be acquired until immediately following employment or within a stipulated period thereafter. The union shop is similar to the closed shop in that membership in the union is a condition of continued employment. Prior to the Taft-Hartley Act, suspension from the union for any reason entailed dismissal from the job. Under the Taft-Hartley Act, suspension from the union entails aismissal from the shop only if membership in the union is denied or terminated for the failure of the employee to tender the periodic dues and the initiation fees uniformly required as a condition of acquiring or retaining membership.

"Union shop" also contemplates a number of alternatives other than the "full" union shop. An example is the modified form of union shop agreed upon by the General Motors Corp. and the United Auto Workers, CIO. The essential provisions of this agreement are as follows:

1. Employees who are members of the union on the effective date of the agreemert must maintain membership.

2. Employees who are not union members on the effective date of the agreement need not join. Any such employee who joins during the life of the agreement must maintain membership.

3. Employees who are hired after the effective date of the agreement must join when they acquire seniority. (Employees may acquire senioritv hy working 90 days during a period of 6 continuous months.)

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