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that the present map must be confidered rather as a monument of the delineator's malignity, than of his wit.-His personalities seem to indicate personal provocation ; though perhaps it may be all pure narionality. Art. 39. Remarks on Dr. Johnson's Life, and critical Obfervations on the Works of Mr. Gray. 8vo.

8vo. 15.6d Fielding. 1782. The partial and uncandid mode of criticism adopted by Dr. Johnfon in his Remarks on Gray, seems to have given general, and indeed, jutt offence to the numerous admirers of that exquisite poet. It is not long lince there appeared an ingenious vindication of the progress of poetry and the Bard, intitled, " A curfory Examination of Dr. Johnton's Stridtures on the lyric Performances of Gray.” The present Writer has taken a larger field : his critical Ægis extends its protection to every part of his admired Hero. And it is but justice to say that he has ably defended him. Art. 40. Remarks on Doctor Johnson's Lives of the most eminent

English Poets. By a Yorkshire Freeholder. 410. I s. 6d. Bald. win.

1782. Our Yorkshire Freeholder's Remarks are chiefly confined to the Doctor's political misrepresentations. He is a' ftrenuous affertor of the Whig principle, which he vindicates against the Tory Doctor, with that honell kind of fpirit which animates a combatant who is firmly perfuaded that he has tro:h on his fide. Art. 4i. Advice to the Officers of the British Army. Small 8vo.

Richardson. The Author discloses a rich vein of wit. His advice, though clothed in the lighter form of ironý, discovers a folid and penetrating judgment: and, while he holds a mirror up, that reflects the true features of vice and folly, he attempts to make ingenuous Mame accomplish the work of rational convidion.

Safe from the bar, the pulpit, and the throne,

Yet touch'd and mov'd by ridicule alone. For there are those who may be laughed out of vice and folly, when all che powers of argument, and all the sanctions of religion, prove ineffe&ual to reclaim them.

It appears to be the with of this truly ingenioos Writer, to contribute his part towards restoring the credit of the army, by checking the still farther progress of those abuses and irregularities that have of late so much fullied its honoar, and diminished its import. ance, in the view of other countries, as well as in the estimation of the wiser part of our own; and by inspiring every officer with less Innents worthy of the duty and character of British soldiers. Art. 42. Observations on the three first Volumes of the History of

Engiiß Poetry, in a familiar Letter to the Author." 410. 2s.6d. Stockdale. 1782.

Familiar enough with a witness! Because, traly, the history of Erglish Poetry contains, beside a few mistakes and inaccuracies, fome harmless' opinions in which ebis Wijter chuses not to affent, he chinks himreif privileged to pour upon its Author the groffelt

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• Rey, March 1782, Art, 27. of the Catalogue.

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it in the most offenfive, illiberal tyle. In brief, he raves in too outragecus a manner, for any fober reader to be infuenced by his coarse declamation. Parties will never be gainers by employing fuch intemperate agents. Art. 30. Consideration of Taxes : Submitted in a Series of Let

ters to Lord North, his Majesty's late First Lord of the Treasury, · and Chancellor of the Exchequer. To which are prefixed a Memorial to the Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's Treasury; and a Letter to Richard Burke, Esq. By J. R. Staub, Notary Public. 8vo. 1 s. 6d. Stockdale. 1782.

Mr. Staub having generously corresponded, during five years, with Lord North, on the subjects of taxation and public credit, without any notice being taken of his letters ; thought proper, on the change of the Ministry, to write also to Mr. Burke, Joint Secretary to the Treasury, inclosing copies of his letters to Lord North, for the confideration of the new commissioners at that board: but these also failing to recommend him to notice, he finished his correspondence by a memorial to the Lords of the Treasury, ftating his pretensions to fore reward, as the first proposer of the tax on bills of exchange and notes of hand, in the above-mentioned letters; and by this final appeal to the Public at large, we are left to infer, that he is equally diffatisfied with all bis ftate correspondents.

What Mr. Sraub'may expect from this publication, is difficult to guess; but from a review of its contents, and of the treatment he has received, we freely declare, that we think few could jutly blame him did his resentment, for the contempt shewn him by two Admini. ftrations, even provoke him to withhold his affillance from all minifters whatever, and leaving the State to take care of itself, to confine his future attention wholly to his own proper concerns, at No. 14, in Sweeting's Alley.

AMERICAN. Art. 31. 1 Reply to Sir Henry Clinton's Narrative. Wherein

his numerous Errors are pointed out, and the Conduct of Lord Cornwallis fully vindicated from all Aspersion: including the whole of the Public and Secret Correspondence between Lord George Germaine, Sir Henry Clinton, and his Lordship; as also intercepted Letters from General Washington. 8vo. 2s. Faulder, &c. 1783. Io this anonymous reply, Lord Cornwallis is vindicated from the misconception of orders, and discretionary conduct, ftated in Sir Henry Clinton's narrative; and Sir Henry is charged with holding out delofive promiles of succour to his Lordship. It is not always easy, after reading both sides, in such complicated transadions, clearly to determine where the blame rests; but it is easy to see who is beft acquainted with decency; and we cannot avoidremarking, that Sir H. C. relates his story in a plain modeft file, that gives dignity to his narrative : whereas, every page in this reply is débased with such illiberal epithets and sarcaltic turns of exo: prefson, as (whatever may be the concealed writer's incentions) are very far from doing any service to the cause he has undertaken.

Lord Ci's own defence of himself in our next.

For the Narrative, see our last Month's Catalogue.

N 4.

Arta

IS.

narrative of which must be supposed to be undertaken with the twofold view of supplying the deficiency of information occafioned by ftopping the daily publication of proceedings, and to expose S, W.D. to ridicule. In the second part, ihe Writer has furnished a key to his Inqueft, which every one will not know the full use of: and, upon the whole, we cannot but join in the proverbial opinion he causes Sancho to deliver, that there is no making a filk purse of a bow's Art. 46. A Letter from Cardinal Bathiani, Primate of Hun

gary, to the Emperor Jofeph II. Trandated from the Original. 8vo. Wilkie. 1782.

The Cardinal, with perfect modefty and respect, proposes to this truly great Emperor several objections to those alterations he was about to make in the ecclefiaftical affairs of his dominions. He writes as a zealous Roman Catholic, high in power, might be supposed to do; but he forgets, that the principles on which he founds the claims of the church have long been disputed, and fully proved to be unsatisfactory and delusive. Joseph 11. has, notwithftanding, proceeded in the changes and innovations here alluded to; and we hope, while guided by the spirit of moderation and wisdom, he will proceed farther. Protestants, though they never can favour the mere exertions of arbitrary power, do, if they are confiftent, behold with pleasure whatever is favourable to the cause of liberty, civil or religious: they may respect the accomplishments of Cardinal Bathiani, as a scholar and a gentleman, but they cannot approve his ecclefiaftical tenets.

SCHOOL-BOOKS. Art. 47. The new Latin and English Dictionary, containing all

the Words and Phrases proper for reading the Classics in both Lan. guages, accurately collected from the most approved Latin Authors. To which is prefixed, a new English Latin Dictionary, carefully compiled from the most celebrated English Writers, rendered in claffical Latin. Both paris comprising all that is most valuable in former Dictionaries. By John Enrick, M. A. A new Edition. Large 12mo. 55. bound. Dilly. 1783.

We mention this new edition of a useful School Book (useful too in private education, on account of the numerous improvements and corrections which the Editor professes to have made in it., particularly in the English Larin part. This part being by much the largest, and most generally useful, is sold separately, price 39. 60. From its portable lize, as well as on other accounts, it is peculiarly useful to boys who are learning Latin. Art. 48. Chambaud Improved ; or, French and English Exer

cises, with their respective Grammar Rules at the Head of each Chapter and Exercise. By James Nicholson, Maiter of Languages. 8vo. 25. 6d. Murray. 1782.

The reputation of Chambaud's Crammar and Exercises is fuffici. ently established : yet they will be allowed sometimes to be tedious in the Exceptions and Examples. The chief improvement in this

• This, indeed, is obvious from the greatly increased size of the volume.

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new edition, is the placing the Rules iumediately before the Exercises which relate to them, and shortening them as far as is confiftent with perspicuity. Our Author, who informs us, that he was educated at the university of Paris, from his infancy, and has taught the French and Latin languages many years past in some of the capital schools of this kingdom,' appears to have executed his talk with judgment and propriety. This improvement on Chambaud hath already received the recommendation of some eminent schoolmasters; and we have litile doubt but it will be very generally adopted. Art. 49. A Radical Vocabulary of the French Language. Printed

for John Murdoch, Teacher of French, &c. in Staples-inn Build. iogs. 12mo. 2s. 6d. 1782.

A new attempt to teach the French language, by making the scholar learn the radical words. In this Vocabulary we have above 3,005 words which will require a long time to learn, and an uncommon memory to retain : in their detached, or, if we may so express it, infulated fate. All this while too, the understanding is not farpened, or improved ; and memory acts, as it were, by itself. It is certain that these words must be known before the scholar can be said to have acquired the language, in whatever way a master may teach it. But, independent of the knowledge of idiom, infection, &c. &c. which he acquires by the authors he reads, he is amused, and, perhaps, instructed too. He sees the words in their proper connection, which inprints their fignification more strongly than by learning their meaning in their primitive and unconnected state. They coalesce with others; and the association of ideas makes the impression of them deeper and more lasting.

Mr. Murdoch is, however, confident of the soccess of his plan onder bis own superintendence. We cannot dispute this point with him, because we are not acquainted with his papils, nor have we feen the result of his experiment. If any have a better opinion of it than we have, they are ac liberty to make the trial; and we wilh it

may answer.

RELIGIOU S. Art. 5o. An Entrance into the Sacred Language; containing the

neceffary Rules of Hebrew Grammar in English: with the ori. ginal Text of several Chapters, select Verses, and useful Hittories, translated Verbatim, and analysed. Likewise some select Pieces of Hebrew Poetry. By the Rev. C. Bayley, of Trin. Coil. Camb. 8vo. 59. Jewed. Longman. 1782.

We think the Author promises too much, when he says, that the whole is digested in so easy a manner, that a child of seven years old may arrive at a competene knowledge of the Hebrew scriptures, with very little aslittance.'-The admission of the Majoratic points will necessarily create some degree of perplexity to the Audent in Hebrew, even though he may be passed the days of childhood. Mr. Bayley is, however, a very zealous advocate for the utility, and even the necessity of the points. He thinks they are an esential part of the facred language : they determine the pronunciation, and not only so, but they define the exact meaning of the words.Wicbout then there will be coo much left to wild conjecture, and how bazardous it would be to leave any part of the sacred records that the present map must be considered rather as a monument of the delineator's malignity, than of his wit.-His personalities feem to indicate personal provocation; though perhaps it may be all pure nationality. Art. 39. Remarks on Dr. Johnson's Life, and critical Obferva.

tions on the Works of Mr. Gray. 8vo. 15. 6d Fielding. 1782.

The partial and uncandid mode of criticism adopted by Dr. Johnfon in his Remarks on Gray, feems to have given general, and indeed, jutt offence to the numerous admirers of that exquisite poet. It is not long since there appeared an ingenious vindication of the progress of poetry and tbe Bard, intitled, "A corfory Examination of Dr. Johnson's Suridures on the lyric Performances of Gray.” The present Writer has taken a larger field : his critical Ægis extends its prote&tion to every part of his admired Hero. And it is but justice to say that he has ably defended him. Art. 40. Remarks on Doctor Johnson's Lives of the most eminent

English Poets. By a Yorkshire Freeholder. 410. 1 s. 6ď. Bald. win. 1782.

Our Yorkshire Freeholder's Remarks are chiefly confined to the Doctor's political misrepresentations. He is a' ftrenuous affertor of the Whig principle, which he vindicates against the Tory Doctor, with that honest kind of fpirit which animates a combatant who is firmly perfuaded that he has trash on his fide. Art. 4i. Advice to the Officers of the British Army. Small 8vo.

Richardson. The Author discloses a rich vein of wit. His advice, though clothed in the lighter form of irony, discovers a solid and penetrating judgment: and, while he holds a mirror up, that reflects th true features of vice and folly, he attempis to make ingenuous fame atcomplish the work of rational conviction.

Safe from the bar, the pulpit, and the throne,

Yec touch'd and mov'd by ridicule alone. For there are those who' may be laughed out of vice and folly, whea all the powers of argument, and all the sanctions of religion, prove ineffeétual to reclaim them.

It appears to be the with of this truly ingenioos Writer, to contribute his part towards restoring the credit of the army, by checking the still farsher progress of those abuses and irregularities that have of late so much fullied its honour, and diminished its import- ance, in the view of other countries, as well as in the estimation of the wiser part of our own; and by inspiring every officer with fena thinenis worthy of the duty and character of British soldiers. Art. 42. Observations on the three first Volumes of the History of

English Poetry, in a familiar Letter to che Author. 410. 25.6d. Stockdale. 1782.

Familiar enough with a witness ! Because, troly, the history of English Poetry contains, beside a few mistakes and inaccuracies, fome harmless opinions to which this Weiter choses not to affent, he chinks himself privileged to pour upon its Author the grosselt

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• Rey, March 1782, Art, 27. of the Catalogue.

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