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Rovusement, but candour was much hurt, and offended at the male volence which predominaces in every part. Some passages, it must be allowed, are judicious and well-written, but make not fufficiens compensacion for so much spleen and ill-humour.

Never was any biographer more sparing of his praises, or more abundant in his censures. He seemingly delights more in exposing blemishes, than in recommending beauties; slightly pasies over excellencies, enlarges upon im pesfections, and, not content with his own severe reflections, revives old scandal, and produces large quotations from the long forgotten works of former critics. His reputation was so high in the republic of letters, that it wanted not to be raised opon the rein of others. But these essays, instead of raising a higher idea inan was before entertained of bis understanding, have certainly given the world a worse opinion of his temper. The Bishop was, iberefore, the more surprised and concerned for his townsman, for he selpected him ant only for his genius and learning, but valued him much more for the wore amiable part of his character, bis bumanity and charily, his morality and religion. Lenit albescens ani. mos capillus, as Horace says. Old age should lenify, should soften men's manners, and make them more mild and gentle; but often has the contrary effect, hardens their hearts, and renders them more four and crabbed. The panegyrit of Savage in his youth, nay in bis old age, become the fauirit of the most favourite authors ; in both cases alike to be blamed, his encomium as unjust and undeserved as his censuses.'

At the end of the Bishop's life, we have three appendixes. The first is a speech intended to have been spoken in the House of Lords, on the second reading of the difTenter's bill, May 19, 1772. The second is entitled, “ Sentiments of a moderate Man concerning Toleration, 1779. The third, is ' a Letter to the New Parliament, with Hints of some Regulations which the Nation hopes and expects from them.' For tbe credit of the Bishop's head and heart, the speech that was unspoken should have been unpublished, especially as he professed to have adopted more liberal principles afterwards. But the cold leaven' had so diffused itself through the whole lump,' that it favoured of it too strongly to the last. Servabit odorem tefta diu!--His reflections on the diffenters are so acrimonious, and on the whole so unjust, that our veneration for his memory, and real esteem of the many excellencies of his character, make us forely lament their publication; and we wish it were porsible to consign them to the darkness from whence they sprung, that not a cloud might arise from them to shade the milder Justre of the Dishop's name.

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an inexhaufible fand of wit and learning. As a friend he was in. genuous and communicative, would answer any questions, would refolve any doubts, delivered his sentiments upon all subje&ts freely and without reserve, laid open his very heart; and the character which he was pleased to give Mr. Pope, of being the foul of friend fhin, was more juftly applicable to him, and more properly bis owo. The same warmth of temper which animated his friendlhip, fharpened likewise his resentment: but even to his enemies, if he was easily provoked, he was as easily reconciled, especially after the leaft acknowledgment and submisiion; so that his friend cruly applied to him the saying,

Irasci facilis, tamen ut placabilis effet. He was rather a tall, robust, large boned man, of a frame that seemed to require a good supply of provisions to support it : but he was fenfible, if he had lived as other people do, he must bave used a good deal of exercise ; and if he had, it would have interrupted the course of his studies, to which he was so devoted as to deny himself any other indulgence; and so became a fingular example, not only of temperance, but even of abllinence in eating and drinking ; and yet his spirits were not lowered or exhausted, but were rather raised and encreased by bis low living. . . . His capital work, the Divine Legation of Moses, is left unfinished, to the loss and regret of all who have any regard for religion and learning: It is indeed a loss much to be lamented, whatever was the cause, whether he was disgusted at the ill receprior which was given to the work by several of the clergy, for whose use and service it was principally in. tended, or whether he was diverted from it by the numerous controversies, wherein he was engaged in the defence of it. But he ihculd have cared for none of those things, and should have proceeded directly and steadily to the end. The viper might have faliened upon his band, but, like St. Paul, he should have thaken off the beast into the fire, and, like bim too, would certainly have felç no harm.'

Bishop Newton informs us, that some books were publined in 1981, which employed some of his leisure hours in his rural retreat (viz. Kew Green), and during his illness.'The following is his opinion of the respective merits of those which engaged the most general attention of the public; how juft that opinion is we leave to the decision of our readers.

• Mr. Gibbon's History of the Decline and Fall of tbe Roman Expire, he read throughour, but it by no means answered bis expecta. tions : for he found it rather a prolix and tedious performance, his manner uninteresting, and his file affected : his teftimonies pot to be depended upon, and his frequent scoffs at religion offensive to every fober mind. . . The Bishop's reading the whole was a greater compliment to the work than was paid to ic by two of the most eminent of his brethren for their learning and itation. The one entered upon it, but was soon wearied, and laid it aside in disgust. The ocher returned it upon the bookseller's hands; and it is said that Mr. Gibbon himseli happened unluckily to be in the shop at the same time.--Dr. Johnson's Lives of the Poets afforded more aan usement, but candour was much hurt, and offended at the male volence which predominates in every part. Some passages, it must be allowed, are judicious and well-written, but make not fufficient compensation for fo much spleen and ill-humour. Never was any biographer more sparing of his praises, or more abundant in his censures. He seemingly delights more in exposing blemishes, than in recommending beauties; Nightly passes over excellencies, enlarges upon imperfections, and, not content with his own severe reflections, sevives old scandal, and produces large quotations from the long forgotten works of former critics. His reputation was so high in the republic of letters, that it wanted not to be raised upon the ruin of others. But these eff'ays, instead of raising a higher idea than was before entertained of bis understanding, have certainly given the world a worse opinion of his temper. The Bishop was, Therefore, ihe more surprised and concerned for his townsman, for he respected him dot only for his genius and learning, but valued him much more for the inore amiable part of his character, his bumanity and charity, his morality and religion. Lenit albescens ania mos capillus, as Horace says. Old age should lenify, should soften men's manners, and make them more mild and gentle; but often has the contrary effect, hardens their hearts, and renders them more four and crabbed. The panegyrist of Savage in his youth, nay in bis old age, become the faciriit of the moit favourite authors ; in both cases alike to be blamed, his encomium as unjult and undeserved as his censures.'

amusement,

At the end of the Bishop's life, we have three appendixes. The first is a speech intended to have been spoken in the House of Lords, on the second reading of the diffenter's bill, May 19, 1772. The second is entitled, “ Sentiments of a moderate Man concerning Toleration, 1779. The third, is ' a Letter to the New Parliament, with Hints of some Regulations which the Nation hopes and expects from them.' for the credit of the Bishop's head and heart, the speech that was unspoken should have been unpublithed, especially as he professed to have adopted more liberal principles afterwards. But the cold haven' had so diffused itself through the whole lump,' that it savoured of it too strongly to the last. Servabit odorem tefta diu !-His reflections on the disenters are so acrimonious, and on the whole so unjust, that our veneration for his memory, and real esteem of the many excellencies of his character, make us forely lament their publication ; and we wish it were por fible to confign them to the darkness from whence they sprung, that not a cloud might arise from them to Thade the milder luftre of the Bishop's name.

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If we have any objection to this fair commentator, it is with respect to her sometimes indulging, perhaps, a little too much in conjecture.

In the foregoing observations, which are, in general, very judicious and proper, we apprehend that she has supposed a degree of criminality in Jephthah, beyond what the scripture hath warranted. It is no where intimated that he intended to facrifice an human victim ; nor could he possibly have entertained a design so totally incompatible with his lituation as a public man (a chief, a judge of Israel), from whom the strictest regard to the Mosaic law was indispensably requisite; and of that. Jaw a groffer violation could not have been offered.-In truth, we have not a doubt, but that a human facrifice was entirely out of the question, unless the unfortunate virgin's being devoted to celibacy may be termed a sacrifice. And in this opinion we are countenanced by the best critics upon the passage. ART. XII. POEMATA VARIA quorum nonnulla nunc primion in Lacem eduntur.

8vo. boards. T. Payne. 1781. HESE poems, which, to the admirers of Latin verse, will

furnith an agreeable repast, are partly original, and partly feleded. The mode of selection is, however, a peculiar one : the poems are not taken verbatim from the authors of whom they are borrowed, but are new-modelled and embelliflaed, according to the taste and fancy of the felector. In some initances the passages that are thought defective, or inelegant, are omitted, and the omiffions supplied. In others, the poetical architect takes down the whole of the building, and puts the materials together again afresh, as in the following:

AD CICADAM,
Oh comis que populeis, Cicada,
Intides, roremg; bibis cadeniem
Calitus, foles nimiùm fugaces

Voce laceflens,
Imbrolâ, ne tu tenois querelæ
Definas, r xæq; lovis, volatu,
Nempe quam fas eft properantio i

Piæterit affas.
Jamg; brumalis grave frigus auræ
Gutturis claudens iter obilrepentis
Franget exiles tibi delicati

Corporis artus. As it came from the hands of the original designer, CASIMIRE, it itands thus :

O que populei fumma fedens coma,
Cæl roreferis ebria lacrymis,

Erie voce, Cicada,

Et mutum recreas Nemus,

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Port longas biemes, dum nimium brevis
Æfas le levibus præcipitat rotis,

Feftinos, age, lento

Soles excipe jurgio,
Ut fe quæque dies attulit optima,
Sic fe quæque rapit : nulla fuit fatis,

Unquam longa voluptas,

Longus fæpius est dolor. The following elegant little ode, though on a subject on which scarcely any thing new can be said, is probably the Author's own: we say probably, because as there are no references to the original poems, which he tells us ex obfcuris et rarioribus fcriptis desumpta funt, it is very possible some of them may be Taken from authors we have never seen, or if seen, have forgotten.

AD SOMNUM.
SOMNE, curarum requies, veneno
Efficax dulci reparare vires
Quas dies fenfim minuit, laborum

Anxia nutrix.
Cur meo cur ab! procul e cubili,
Avolas verlis, fugitive, pennis,
Integras damnans vigilare masum,

Te fine noctes?
Lupa ter, cælo revoluta, clarum,
Extulit cornu tua dum per umbras,
Dona nequicquàm videt inquietis

Poscere votis.
En tibi preffo filet ore lucis,
Nuncius, Arati filuere venti,
Ipse fons dormit placidè refufis,

Margine lymphis.
Si venis tum me referente grates
Audies vitæ pater atq; cuftos,
Pallide nec jam metuas vocari

Mortis imago. Belides two books of odes, there is a third, consisting chiefly of epigrams, among which are many very excellent ones. The book is elegantly printed, though not very correctly.

Art. XIV. A Discourse, delivered to the Students of the Royal

Academy on the Diflribution of the Prizes, Dec. 10, 1782. By the President. 4to. 35. Cadell. HIS Discourse does great honour to the taste and judgment

of its Author. He introduces it with observing, that the highest ambition of every artist is to be thought a man of. genius; that as long as this flattering quality is joined to his name, he can bear with patience the imputation of carelessness, incorreness, or defects of whatever kind ; that so far is the presence of

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