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he might have a stock in hand when he entered on the ministry. His title for orders was his Fellowship; and he was ordained Deacon in December 1729, and Priest in the February following, by Bishop Gibson.

At his first setting out in the world, he officiated as curate at St. George's, Hanover-square; and continued for several years affistant preacher to Dr. Trebeck. His first preferment was that of reader and afternoon-preacher at Grosvenor chapel, in South-Audley street.

This introduced him to the family of Lord Tyrconnel, to whore fon he became tutor. He continued in this situation for many years, very much at his ease, and on terms of great intimacy and friendship with Lord and Lady Tyrconnel, without so much (says he) as an unkind word or a cool look ever intervening.'

In the spring of 1744, he was, through the interest of the Earl of Bath (who was his great friend and patron, and whose friendship and patronage were returned by grateful acknowledgments and the warmest encomiums), presented to the rectory of St. Mary le Bow; so that he was forty years old before be obtained any living.

At the commencement in 1745, he took his Doctor's degree.

In the spring of 1747 he was chosen lecturer of St. George's, Hanover-square, by a most respectable veftry of noblemen and gentlemen of high diftinction,

In August following he married his first wife, the eldest daughter of Dr. Trebeck, ' an unaffected, modeft, decent, young woman, with whom he lived very happy, in mutual love and harmony, near seven years.'

In 1749 he published his edition of Milton's Paradise Lost, which (says he, very modestly), it is hoped hath not been ill received by the public, having, in 1775, gone through eight edicions. After the Paradise Loft, it was judged (says he) proper that Dr. Newton should also publish the Paradise Regained, and other poems of Milton; but these things he thought detained him from other more material studies, though he had the good fortune to gain by them more than Milton did by all his works put together. But his greatest gain (he says) was their first introducing him to the friendship and intimacy of two such men as Bishop Warburton and Dr. Jortin, whose works will speak for them better than any private commenda, tion.

In 1754 he loft his father, at the age of 83, and within a few days his wife, at the age of 38. This was the severest trial he ever underwent, and almost overwhelmed him. At that time he was engaged in writing his Dissertations on the

Prophecies; them on the scale of common life, and familiarize them by common incidents. It is from this principle (which is general to the human mind) that narratives, like that which we have before us, are so pleasing and agreeable. We see the great softened and mellowed by the easy and entertaining. Dignity throws off its restraints, and invites us to a nearer intercourse. We love to be pleased by that which hath awed us, and are fond of those stories which graft amusement on events which have excited admiration.

From this multifarious mass we will select a few anecdotes concerning some persons, and events of consequence and celebrity, which, we doubt not, will afford entertainment to readers who are not too nice and critical in their taste. It fometimes happens (says the Bishop's friend in the preface) that an old man's chit-chat is very agreeable.'

Of Bishop Smaldridge we have the following character :

. He was a truly worthy prelate, an excellent icholar, a sound di. ine, an eloquent preacher, a good writer, both in Latin and Englith, of great gravity and dignity in his whole deportment, and, at the same time, of as great complacency and sweetness of manners : a character at once both amiable and venerable. He was so noted for good temper, that succeeding Dr. Atterbury in the deaneries of Carlisle and Christ-church, he was said to carry the bucket wherewith to extinguish the fires which the other had kindled.... Mr. Whifton, in the memoirs of his life, would fain represent Bifhop Smaldridge as an Arian, and a friend to him and Dr. Clarke. He was, indeed, a friend to all mankind, and conversed with those two learned men in the spirit of meekness, and was for moderating the violent proceedings of the convocation against them : bur Whifton was always too fanguine and opinionative. Whatever he took into his head he firmly believed ; and because he wished the Bithop to be as himself, he fondly concluded him to be such an one. However, the report so far prevailed, that the Bishop thoughe proper to dis. claim it, and to affert his constant belief of the Trinity, in a letter addressed but a few days before his death, to Sir Jonathan Trelawny, Bishop of Winchester, and by him attefied and made pube lic.'

In August 1722, not many days after performing the last office at the magnificent funeral of the great Duke of Marlborough, Bishop Atterbury was taken into custody, and carried before a committee of the Privy Council, where, being under examination, he made use of those words of our Saviour, “ If I tell you, you will not believe; and if I ask you, you will not answer me, nor let me go :" and he was committed a prisoner to the Tower for treasonable practices. There is too much realon to fear that the Bishop had been dabbling in this kind of politics; but a full and clear detection of the conspijacy was never obtained. ....... After the Weilminter election was over (in 1723), some of the King's scholars thought it a very proper piece of respect to wait upon their late dean ( Atterbury) in the Tower, as every body had shen free admittance to see and take Night but necessary addition, in order to convey to the reader some information respecting the time and manner of his death. · The Bishop finished the whole of this work a very few days before it pleased God to release him. He might very juftly wonder how such a weak, infirm body was so long preserved ; for few men, perhaps, had more constant or severer infirmities to combat with than himlelf. On Saturday, the gth of February 1781, he began to find his breatn much affected by the frost.' His complaints grew worse and worse till the Thursday following. He got up at five o'clock, and was placed in a chair by the fire ; complained to his wife how much he had suffered in bed, and repeated to himself that portion of the Psalms, “ () my God, I cry unto thee in the day-time,” &c. &c. About fix o'clock he was left by his apothecary in a quiet sleep. Between seven and eight he awoke, and appeared rather more eaty, and took a little refreshment. He continued dozing till near nine, when he ordered his servant to come and dress him, and help him down stairs. As soon as he was dressed, he enquired the hour, and bid his servant open the shutter and look at the dial of St. Paul's. The servant answered, it was upon the stroke of nine. The Bishop made an effort to take out his watch, with an intent to set it; but funk down in his chair, and expired without a figh, or the least visible emotion, his countenance still retaining the same placid appearance which was so peculiar to him when alive.'

These leading outlines of the Bishop's life are selected from the scattered materials which die before us, and which are so blended and incorporated with anecdotes and relations of a foreign and sometimes heterogeneous nature, that a reader is apt to be confused by them, and, without particular attention, may not always readily perceive when the narration speaks of him. self, or of some other person. We have, however, received great entertainment, and no small degree of curious information from the perusal of the whole. Some of the anecdotes are trilling; and a faftidious critic would affect to be offended at the garrulity of an old man, every where too discernible in these theers : But to us, who with not to refine away our pleasures by a squeamish taste, the narrative hath all the charm of easy and familiar conversation. Events thai dignify the page of history are generally viewed on the large scale. Minute circumstances, with which they were connected, are always kept out of fight; but after we have received a strong impresion from the former, we are ever prepared to receive anirement from the latter. Is is the same with great and distinguished names. After we have been taught to think of them with reverence, we are fond of any anecdotes that relate to their persons, habits, or even accidental connections or adventures. We love to contemplate them on the scale of common life, and familiarize them by common incidents. It is from this principle (which is general to the human mind) that narratives, like that which we have before us, are so pleasing and agreeable. We see the great softened and mellowed by the easy and entertaining. Dignity throws off its restraints, and invites us to a nearer intercourse. We love to be pleased by that which hath awed us, and are fond of those stories which graft amusement on events which have excited admiration.

them

From this multifarious mass we will select a few anecdotes concerning some persons, and events of consequence and celebrity, which, we doubt not, will afford entertainment to readers who are not too nice and critical in their taste. - It sometimes happens (says the Bishop's friend in the preface) that an old man's chit-chat is very agreeable.'

Of Bishop Smaldridge we have the following character:

. He was a truly worthy prelate, an excellent icholar, a sound divine, an eloquent preacher, a good writer, both in Latin and Eng. lish, of great gravity and dignity in his whole deportment, and, at the same time, of as great complacency and sweetness of manners : a character at once both amiable and venerable. He was so noted for good temper, that succeeding Dr. Atterbury in the deaneries of Carlisle and Christ-church, he was said to carry the bucket wherewith to extinguish the fires which the other had kindled..... Mr. Whiffon, in the memoirs of his life, would fain represent Bishop Smaldridge as an Arian, and a friend to him and Dr. Clarke. He was, indeed, a friend to all mankind, and conversed with those two learned men in the spirit of meekness, and was for moderating the violent proceedings of the convocation against them : bur Whifton was always too sanguine and opinionative. Whatever he took into his head he firmly believed ; and because he wished the Bishop to be as himself, he fondly concluded him to be such an one. However, the report so far prevailed, that the Bishop thoughe proper to dis. claim it, and to assert his constant belief of the Trinity, in a letter addressed but a few days before his death, to Sir Jonathan Trelawny, Bishop of Winchester, and by him attefted and made public.'

. In August 1722, not many days after performing the last office at the magnificent funeral of the great Duke of Marlborough, Bishop Atterbury was taken into custody, and carried before a committee of the Privy Council, where, being under examination, he made use of those words of our Saviour, “ If I tell you, you will not believe; and if I ask you, you will not answer me, nor let me go :" and he was committed a prisoner to the Tower for treasonable practices. There is too much reason to fear that the Bishop had been dabbling in this kind of politics; but a full and clear detection of the conspiracy was never obtained. . . . . ... After the Weliminfter election was over (in 1723), some of the King's scholars thought it a very proper piece of respect to wait upon their late dean (Atterbury) in the Tower, as every body had then free admittance to see and take their leave of him; and among other things which he said to them, he applied to himself those lines of Milton :

The world is all before me, where to chuse

My place of rest, and Providence my guide.' Of Dr. Bentley, and his antagonift Dr. Middleton, we have the following account:

• Dr. Bentley was indeed an arbitrary master; attended little to the duties of his ftation ; very rarely was seen in the chapel ; and fet no good example, but that of hard study. In his latter days he loved bis bottle of old Port; and used to say, that Claret would be Port if it could. However, he must be allowed to have been an excellent scholar, a most acute and able critic, and had withal a great deal of wit and pleasantry. His edition of Paradise Loft may be said to be his most puny child; and his edition of the Greek Teftament (to the regret of the learned world) proved an abortion. It was said, that a design was formed of bringing over Le Clerc from Holland, and for constituting him the Royal Librarian, which place was then poffeffed by Dr. Bentley, wbo, for this reason, was supposed to publith his edition of the fragments of Menander and Philemon, which Le Clerc bad published before, in order to expose the fatility of Le Clerc's criticisms, and thereby to disconcert the scheme for his intended promotion. His edition of Terence engaged bim in a controversy with Dr. Hare, another editor of Terence, which was the more extraordinary, as they had been good friends before, and drew a severe reflection upon them from Sir Tsaac Newton, that two such divines, instead of minding the duties of their fun&ion, should be squabbling about an old play-book. His English writings are not so Dumerous as his Latin. His sermons at Boyle's Lectures, being the first that were preached upon that foundation ; his Dissertations on the Epifles of Themiftocles, Socrates, Euripides, and Æsop's Fables, annexed ro Worron's Reflections on Ancient and Modern Learning; his Remarks on Collins's Discourse on Free thinking, for which he received the thanks of the clergy; and his chief work, his Differtations on the Epiftles of Phalaris, with his Answer to the Objections of Mr. Boyle, afterwards Earl of Orrery. This work passed under the name of Mr. Boyle; but it is generally known that he was afifted in it by Alterbory, who had been his cutor, and by other learned and ingenions men of Christ Church ; in somuch that Swift, in the Battle of the Books, says, that Boyle's suit of armour was given him by all the Gods. The wits at that time generally gave the preference to Mr. Boyle, as Swift did in the Barile of the Books ; for Dr. Bentley's Differtation having been first published at the end of Wotton's Reflections, &c. Swift represented Boyle with a lance, thrusting them through both together, and spitting them like a couple of woodcocks. Dr. Garth, likewise, has these memorable lines in his Dispensary :

So diamonds take a luftre from their foil,

And to a Bentley 'tis we owe a Boyle. • Bat all men of letters are now agreed, that Dr. Bentley has greatly the advantage in point of argument, as well as learning. It is a controversy very well worth reading, for she uncommon erudition

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