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England : written by the fame, Feb. 13. A. 1600.' A dircourse touching the unlawfulness of private combats : written by Sir Edward Cook, Lord Chief Justice of England, at the request of the Lord Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton.' Of a lie, how it may be satisfied, or at least how it ought to be dealt in by an Earl Marthal; as also what laws are necessary to be establihed to prevent the many barbarous mischiefs that daily do happen, for default of some such course to be taken. Anonymous.' This last is the best of the tracts on the subject, inculcating true principles of honour and magnanimity of soul, in opposition to duels and private encounters,

• No. 5. Of the first establishment of English laws, and parliaments in the kingdom of Ireland, OA. 11. 1611. Written by James Ulher, afterwards Archbishop of Armagh.' • No. 6. A discourse Thewing when, and how far, the Impeperial laws were received by the old Irish, and the several in. habitants of Great Britain. By the same.' The firit of these articles may be somewhat entertaining at the present juncture. It appears very clearly, that early care was taken, and continued, that the laws of England should be observed in Ireland. As to the parliaments of that country, it appears also, that the first order out of England which the Archbishop could obtain concerning them, is the constitution of King Edward II. in the 12th year of his reign, directing that parliaments should be held yearly in the land of Ireland. By other means it is found that they had been held much earlier, even in the 48th of Henry III. As to the Imperial law, we are told, that the precise time of the first profession of the civil law in England was about the year 1149 : It is more a matter of curiosity than of importance. The principles of good sense, of truth and equity, of justice and humanity, are now too well understood to render it necessary for us to look back to directions of barbarous, or far less enlightened ages, and rules prescribed in times of conquest or arbitrary power. We may infert here a fort fentence from the next article ;' herein appeareth fome of the glory and riches of the Common law above the Civil or Feudal laws; for these laws hammer out plenty of legal or chymical diftinctions,—by reason whereof ihe poor clients in their courts roll the stone of Silyphus.' Happy, then, are the people who are emancipated from these shackles, wbich, under the notion of superior learning and abilities, serve only to enrich and aggrandize, at their expence, a few individuals !

* No. of ancient tenures. Written by Sir Walter Raleigh.' This is a long and curious article. No. 8. is an orie ginal letter to the Marquis of Buckingham from Queen Anne, wife to James I. copied by Abp. Sancroft,'-This, if we mire

take

Mr. Fuller's observations of the shires is a humorous article, representing the counties as complaining of Madam London, who devours them all, and snatching her crown from her ; but at length in comes Mother England, a grave matron, who foon settles the dispute.

• No. 24. An abstract of the plate presented to the King's Majesty by the several colleges of Oxford, and the gentry of the county, 20th Jan. 1642.'

The next number might have been spared, not that it is void of sense, or ill written, but it is produced by a prejudiced party-man on party-affairs, and the subject treated accordingly. Of the origin and progress of the revolutions in England. Written by Mr. M. Wren.' It relates to the times of Charles the First. The Author finds out many causes for this calamity, but he neglects, or paffes slightly over the chief, viz. the arbitrary and oppreffive principles and practices of government. No doubt there were faults on all sides, as there ever are in such contentions ; but every man who loves his country, his friends, himself, will surely rejoice in the downfal of flavish and tyrannical maxims and usurpations.

No. 26. A letter of Dr. Lloyd, bishop of St. Asaph, to Mr. Thomas Price of Llanvyllen, concerning Jeffrey of Monmouth's history, &c.' This will afford fome entertainment to the exact antiquary.

Nos. 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, relate to the affair of printing in the two universities. The last of these papers is dated 12th September 1634.

No. 33. Reasons why the judicature or expulfion of a scholar or fellow of a college, doth not belong to the determination of the judges of the common law.'

We now arrive at the most interesting and important part of the volume, consisting of a number of papers relative to the conduct of King James II, and the consequent happy revolution in the English state and government. We can do little more than lay before our readers the titles of these papers.

• The dockett of King James the Second's license, dispensation, and pardon for Obadiah Walker, Nath. Boyfe, Thomas Dean, and John Bernard, May 1686.' These persons were Papifts, members of the university of Oxford, in whole favour the lawless King exerted his supposed dispensing power, as he did in many other instances. • List of books which Obadiah Walker was permitted to print, by a license from King James II. May 1686.' Our readers will easily judge of what kind there books were.

• King James the Second's license, dispensation, and pardon for Edward Sclater of Putney, Surry, clerk.' • License dispensation, and pardon for John Malley, M. A. Fe low of

Merton

Merton College, late appointed Dean of Chrift-Chorch, Oxford.'

« Princess of Orange's letter to Archbishop Sancroft. Copy of Abp. Sancroft's answer. Probably never fent.' Two letters to the Archbishop from Dr. Stanley, in Holland, relating to the measures employed by the King, to gain over the Princess of Orange to the church of Rome, and her firmness to the Proteftant cause, with other particulars. • Matter of fact : by the E. of CI

Concerning the King's dispensing power and the Test act.' « Audacious. attempts of Popish seducers in King James's reign.'

A number of short letters to and from the Archbishop and Bishops, followed by the petition against distributing and read. ing his declaration for liberty of conscience; conferences with the King thereupon, and the warrant committing them to the Tower : Several other letters on this subject; instructions for the Bishops relative to their trial ; speeches prepared by some of them, and proceedings at Westminster Hall on the 29th and 30th of June, 1688, when they were, on a unanimous verdict, honourably and joyfully released.

• No. 59. Articles recommended by the Archbishop of Canterbury to all the Bishops within his Metropolitan jurisdiction, the 16th July, 1668.' This contains a number of pious, judicious, candid, and useful directions. • Inttructions to the Judges itinerant in summer 1668, together with Justice Allibon's charge at the aflizes at Croydon,' No. 60, 61, are of a different kind, and, under a specious appearance, labour to reconcile people's minds to those methods which the King wished to employ, and those principles he would have establish ed.

• Copy of an address to King James II. from the Bishops,' presenting several articles of complaint worthy their station and character. An account of some of the Bishops presencing an address to the King, with ten advices.'

The last number we shall particularly specify is the 71st, • A journal of what passed between the King and some of the Bishops, concerning an abhorrence of the designs of the Prince of Orange, 1668. With some original letters.' This is a va. luable part of the Collection, but will not admit of extracts. Befide the general account, we have particular relations of the conferences given by the Bishops of Rochester and of Peterborough. The volume concludes with a vote of thanks from the House of Commons' to the clergy who have preached and written against Popery, and refused to read the King's declas ration for toleration, in opposition to the pretended dispenfing power claimed in the late reign of King James II and Mr. Fuller's observations of the shires is a humorous article, representing the counties as complaining of Madam London, who devours them all, and snatching her crown from her ; but at length in comes Mother England, a grave matron, who foon settles the dispute.

• No. 24. An abstract of the plate presented to the King's Majesty by the several colleges of Oxford, and the gentry of the county, 20th Jan. 1642.'

The next number might have been spared, not that it is void of sense, or ill written, but it is produced by a prejudiced party-man on party-affairs, and the subject treated accordingly. Of the origin and progress of the revolutions in EngJand. Written by Mr. M. Wren.' It relates to the times of Charles the Firit.' The Author finds out many causes for this calamity, but he neglects, or paffes slightly over the chief, viz. the arbitrary and oppreffive principles and practices of government. No doubt there were faults on all fides, as there ever are in such contentions ; but every man who loves his country, his friends, himself, will surely rejoice in the downfal of Navish and tyrannical maxims and usurpations.

No. 26. A letter of Dr. Lloyd, bishop of St. Afaph, to Mr. Thomas Price of Llanvyllen, concerning Jeffrey of Monmouth's history, &c.' This will afford some entertainment to the exact antiquary.

Nos. 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, relate to the affair of printing in the two universities. The last of these papers is dated 12th September 1634.

* No. 33. Reasons why the judicature or expulfion of a scholar or fellow of a college, doth not belong to the determination of the judges of the common law.'

We now arrive at the most interesting and important part of the volume, consisting of a number of papers relative to the conduct of King James II, and the consequent happy revolution in the English state and government. We can do little more than lay before our readers the titles of these papers.

• The dockett of King James the Second's license, dispensation, and pardon for Obadiah Walker, Nath. Boyle, Thomas Dean, and John Bernard, May 1686.' These persons were Papists, members of the university of Oxford, in whole favour the lawless King exerted his supposed difpenfing power, as he did in many other instances. • List of books which Obadiah Walker was permitted to print, by a license from King James II. May 1686. Our readers will easily judge of what kind. these books were.

King James the Second's license, dispensation, and pardon for Edward Sclater of Putney, Surry, clerk.' • License, dispensation, and pardon for John Malley, M. A. Fe low of

Merton

take no offence. This low fubterfuge in base equivocation, leaves us in doubt whether to despise his meannels, or deteft his insincerity.—He cannot be so ignorant as not to know, that an attack on natural religion eventually, as far as it is effectual, injures revelation. A man undermining a foundation may as well pretend that he hath no design on the superstructure, as this man of honour may declare, that though he attempts to prove that there is no evidence of the being of a God from nature, yet that revelation hath nothing to fear from the proof. In reality it hath nothing to fear from his attempts. But it owes no thanks to his good-will. Revelation supposes the existence of a First Cause. It is a postulatum in nature ; and reason is sufficient to settle this point without any supernatural illumination ; or any supernatural evidences, internally bestowed by grace, or externally displayed by miracles. If this be denied, all the proofs to corroborate revelation must be unsubftantial and delusive. We will for a moment supposeand it will be only the chimæra of a moment that this writer's arguments have so far overcome our accustomed sentiments, as to force from our minds the belief of a God, and really produced the effects they were intended to have on our mode of speculation on nature. If the proofs from nature fail, and if every evidence already given were ineffe&tual to work conviction, what could convince us! Revelation.'But how can revelation convince us ? • By the power of miracles. And what are miracles ? « Evidences of the existence of the Deity given out of the common and ordinary course of nature.' But if the general system of nature doth not establila the proof of his existence, how can it be proved by any partial deviations from its ordinary laws? If these laws in their full and constant operation cannot prove it, is it not absurd to appeal to their occasional aberrations ? Can one wonder have so much weight, and ten thousand have none.---We should not be convinced even if one was to rise from the dead-for as atheists, reasoning like the present writer, we should say,

There is some wonderful power in nature (though not dis“ tinct from it), which makes it to be that which it is; and us that also which it hath been from eternity. Changes very “ wonderful and to all men unaccountable have happened. We “ believe that power, whatever it is, may have something " folded up in it, that may at times produce those changes “ those deviations from the common and apparent order of u the general system which fome esteem miraculous. But we “ do not believe that a being distinct from the universe causes " those changes, any more than we believe that such a being “ caused, in the beginning, the order which universally takes place in the great system of nature, We cannot account

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