Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

to award him a number in a rank-list of heroes? It is enough to believe that probably Lincoln alone among historical characters could have done that especial task which he had to do. It was a task of supreme difficulty, and like none which any other man ever had to undertake; and he who was charged with it was even more distantly unlike any other man in both moral and mental equipment. We cannot force lines to be parallel, for our own convenience or curiosity, when in fact they are not parallel. Let us not then try to compare and to measure him with others, and let us not quarrel as to whether he was greater or less than Washington, as to whether either of them, set to perform the other's task, would have succeeded with it, or, perchance, would have failed. Not only is the competition itself an ungracious one, but to make Lincoln a competitor is foolish and useless. He was the most individual man who ever lived; let us be content with this fact. Let us take him simply as Abraham Lincoln, singular and solitary, as we all see that he was; let us be thankful if we can make a niche big enough for him among the world's heroes, without worrying ourselves about the proportion which it may bear to other niches; and there let him remain forever, lonely, as in his strange lifetime, impressive, mysterious, unmeasured, and unsolved.

INDEX.

ADAMS, Charles Francis, i. 231 ; arri- | Ashmun, George, amendment, i. 77 ;

val in London, 372; his instructions, presides over Republican Conven-
373-375 ; his complaints concerning tion, 167.

Confederate privateers, 172, 173. Atlanta, fall of, ii. 284.
Adams, Charles Francis, Jr., enters

Richmond at head of negro regi- Baker, Edward D., i. 68; anecdotes,
ment, ii. 336.

59, 71, 72 ; at inauguration, 220; at
Adams, John, i. 101 n.

Ball's Bluff, 308, 309.
Adams, John Q., i. 74.

Ball's Bluff, the skirmish, i. 308-310.
Adams, Samuel, i. 101 n.

Baltimore riot, i. 257-260.
Alabama, the privateer, ii. 173; de- Banks, Nathaniel P., i. 319 ; ii. 35 ;
stroyed, 302.

during Peninsula Campaign, 44, 45,
Albemarle, the, destroyed, ii. 302. 52; beaten at Winchester, 54 ; un-
Albert, Prince, amends dispatch about der Pope, 74; at Cedar Mountain,
Mason and Slidell, i. 383.

76; takes Port Hudson, 162.
Altoona Conference, ii. 117, 118. Barnard, J. G., opposes McClellan's
Amendment, Thirteenth, to Constitu- plan, i. 336; advice at Yorktown,

tion. See Thirteenth Constitutional ii. 38.
Amendment.

Bates, Edward, candidate for Repub-
Amnesty Proclamation, ii. 224-228 ; as lican nomination for Presidency, i.

result of Sherman-Johnson capitula- 166-170; in the Cabinet, 234-236 ;
tion, 240.

concerning Sumter, 245, 246.
Anderson, Robert, i. 36 ; in Fort Bayard, James A., i. 297.

Moultrie, 185; at Fort Sumter, 243– Beauregard, G. T., at Charleston, i.
249.

244 ; attacks Sumter, 248; in Vir-
Andrew, John A., dispatches troops ginia, 299; at Bull Run and Manas-
to Washington, i. 256, 257.

sas, 300, 301 ; at Shiloh, 362; evacu-
Anthony, Henry B., i. 297.

ates Corinth, 364.
Antietam, battle of, ii. 85.

Bell, John, candidate for presidency,
Arkansas, secedes, i. 269 ; reconstruc- i. 166 attitude of his followers,
tion in, ii. 234, 236, 296–298.

175, 194.
Armstrong, Jack, fight with Lincoln, Benjamin, Judah P., i. 200, 206.
i. 18.

Bermuda Hundred, ii. 281.
Arnold, Isaac N., Lincoln's biogra- Big Bethel, the skirmish, i. 298.

pher, i. 9, 65 n., 67, 148 n., 149 n., Black, J. S., in Buchanan's Cabinet,
297, 307, 385 ; concerning Lincoln's i. 188, 189 n., 198-200.
mother, 9 n. ; concerning Lincoln's Blaine, James G., i. 102 n., 128 n.,
duel, 66 n. ; ii. 24, 214-216, 246 ; in- 168 n., 170 n. ; ii. 4, 15, 53, 123,
troduces abolitionist bill, 13; as to 125, 182, 188.
Greeley's prayer of twenty millions, Blair, Francis P., mission to J. Davis,
106 n. ; Lincoln's only friend in the ii. 304-306.
House, 248 ; Lincoln refuses to aid Blair, Francis P., Jr., i. 297; inter-
his canvass, 290 ; concerning consti- view with Lee, 263 ; influence in St.
tutional amendment for emancipa- Louis, 269 ; ii. 253 ; concerning
tion, 319, 326 ; concerning death of Emancipation Proclamation, 123.
Lincoln, 350.

Blair, Montgomery, in Cabinet, i. 234,
Ashley, James M., i. 297.

236 ; concerning Sumter, 245, 246 ;
concerning advance and route of Buell, Don Carlos, i. 347, 355, 364 ;
army in Virginia, 324, 330; arrested, compared with McClellan, 352, 353;
350 ; effort to force him out of Cab- Lincoln's letter to, 353; at Nash-
inet, ii. 288; resigns, 289; desires ville, and afterward, 360; at Shiloh,
Chief Justiceship, 299.

361 ; ii. 135; returns fugitive slaves,
Blockade, proclaimed, i. 283-285, 293 ; 8; pursues Bragg, 154; relieved,

instructions to Mr. Adams about it, 155.
373; effective, 376.

Bull Run, first battle of, i. 300-302 ;
Booth, J. W., the assassin of Lincoln, second battle of, ii. 77.
ii. 347-350.

Burns, Anthony, i. 99.
Boutwell, George S., ii. 116.

Burnside, Ambrose E., in North Caro-
Bragg, Braxton, in Kentucky and lina, i. 348; given command of army,

Tennessee, ii. 154 ; at Stone's River, ii. 92, 136 ; at Fredericksburg, 136,
155 ; leaves Tennessee, 156, 157 ; in 137; resigns, 138; in Tennessee
Chattanooga, 163 ; at Chickamauga, and Kentucky, 164, 167; arrests
164; besieges Chattanooga, 165 ; at Vallandigham, 186–189.
Lookout Mountain, 166, 167.

Bush, Sarah, i. 11.
Breckenridge, John C., i. 101 ; candi- Butler, B. F., i. 319; at Baltimore,

date for presidency, 164 ; political 260 ; at Big Bethel, 298; at New
position, 175, 180 n.; electoral vote Orleans, 358; “ contraband of war,"
for him, 208; expelled from Senate, ii. 5; at Bermuda Hundred, 281;
299.

for Vice-President, 264 n.
Bright, J. D., i. 297.

Butterfield, Justin, i. 68.
Brooks, Preston S., assaults Charles
Sumner, i. 100.

Cadwalader, George, in case of Mer-
Brough, John, Governor of Ohio, ii. ryman, i. 287.
193, 194.

Calhoun, John, appoints Lincoln dep-
Brown, A. V., i. 188.

uty surveyor, i. 41.
Brown, B. Gratz, aids nomination of Calhoun, John C., i. 106; and Com-
Fremont, ii. 256.

promise of 1850, 90.
Brown, George W., Mayor of Balti- California, admission of State, i. 87-

more, concerning plot to assassinate 92.
Lincoln, i. 217 m.; during the riots, Cameron, Simon, i. 297 ; before Re-
258, 259 ; estimate of Maryland rebel publican nominating convention,
enlistments, 262 n.

1860, 166-170 ; weakness of his Re-
Browning, 0. 'H., i. 68.

publicanism in autumn of 1860, 197;
Bryant, William Cullen, i. 153; op- in cabinet, 234, 235; trouble about
poses Lincoln, ii. 262.

his appointment, 236; in Sumter
Buchanan, James, nominated for matter, 245, 246 ; refuses request

presidency in 1856, i. 101; elected, of Governor Andrew for arms, 256 ;
101; position concerning Lecomp- and orders troops through Balti-
ton Constitution of Kansas, 105, more, 257 ; minister to Russia, 329;
126; quarrels about this with Doug- his proceedings against slavery, ii.
las, 108; hostility to Douglas in 5; “ contraband of war," 5; order
campaign of 1860, 180 n. ; Lincoln's to Sherman, 8; report to Congress
attack upon him in the joint debates recommending the arming of slaves,
of 1858, 127-129; falsely placed, be- 9, 102; remark to Lincoln, 261;
tween election and inauguration of anxiety about Republican success,
Lincoln, 180; worn out, 181; Gov- 274.
ernor Pickens sends him advice, Campbell, John A., dealings with Sew-
also commissioners, 185, 186; opin- ard, i. 239, 245; commissioner for
ions and action in autumn of 1860, peace, ii. 304-307.
187 ; message to Thirty-sixth Con- Canby, E. R. S., ii. 238 n.
gress, 188–190 ; excuses for him in Cartwright, Peter, Lincoln's competi-
demoralization of the North, 190, tor for Congress, i. 73.
195; rallies his courage, 198; the Cass, Lewis, i. 79, 199; in Buchanan's
South Carolina Commissioners and cabinet, 187 ; resignation therefrom,
the Cabinet, 199, 200 ; abused by 198.
Southerners, 200; at Lincoln's inau- Cedar Mountain, battle of, ii. 76.
guration, 220; calls extra session of " Central Illinois Gazette” suggests
Senate, 234; concerning Sumter, Lincoln for Presidency, i. 161.
243; and the navy, 283.

Chambrun, Comte de, anecdote of
Buckner, S. B., surrenders Fort Don- Lincoln, ji. 345.
elson, i. 354, 355.

Chancellorsville, battle of, ii. 141, 142

103 n.

Chandler, Zachariah, i. 296; advice to ments upon in Lincoln-Douglas joint

Lincoln about Conservatives, ii. 214; debates, 125.
concerning H. W. Davis's bill for Comte de Paris, i. 312; ii. 50, 54, 55,
reconstruction, 233.

62, 63.
Chase, Salmon P., i. 106, 129 n., 161, Confederate bonds, sold in England,

296; and Compromise of 1850, 90; ii. 173, 174.
before the Republican nominating Congress of Paris, i. 375-377.
convention in 1860, 166-170; in cabi- Congress, the frigate, i. 356.
net, 234, 235; story of the appoint- Conkling, James C., Lincoln's letter
ment, 236; in Sumter matter, 245, to, ii. 202.
246; subordination to Lincoln, 275, Conkling, Roscoe, i. 297.
276 ; at conference about ordering Copperheads, attitude in Democratic
an advance in Virginia, January, party, ii. 95; activity and power
1861, 323-325; favors Lincoln's plan, of, 182-185; worsted, 193, 194; the
330; on the military situation, 341; Vallandigham episode, 185–189, 193;
would not let slavery influence his meetings and protests of, with Lin-
action, ii. 109; remarks about Eman- coln's replies, 189-193; during the
cipation Proclamation, 117, 118; con- draft riots in New York, 197.
tribution to final proclamation, 131 ; Corbett, Boston, shoots Booth, ii. 350.
full control allowed to him in his Corinth, capture of, i. 360–364.
department, 171 ; offer of resigna- Corning, Erastus, i. 297.
tion at time of cabal against Seward, Covode, J., i. 297.
177-181; complains of Lincoln, 248; Cox, s. s., 'i. 297.
scheme to make him Republican Crittenden, J. J., i. 297 ; prefers Doug-
nominee for presidency, 249-252 ; las to Lincoln, 117 n. ; efforts for
subsequent difficulties with Lincoln, compromise, 202 ; resolutions con-
resulting in resignation, 253, 254 ; cerning purpose of war, ii. 4.
an enemy of M. Blair, 288; appoint Cumberland, the frigate, i. 356.
ed Chief Justice, 299, 300.

Curtin, Andrew G., ii. 202; concern-
Chattanooga, siege of, ii. 165-167. ing Altoona conference, etc., 117.
Chickamauga, battle of, ii. 164. Curtis, B. R., in Dred Scott case, i.
Childe, E. Lee, i. 263 n., 264 n.
Chittenden, L. E., i. 181, 382, 387. Curtis, S. R., at Pea Ridge, i. 351.
Cisco, John J., ii. 254.

Cushing, W. B., destroys the Albe-
Clay, Henry, i. 73, 78, 106; Lincoln's marle, ii. 302.

feeling towards him, 70, 71 ; and the

Compromise of 1850, 89 et seq. Davis, David, i. 68; in Republican
Clinton, De Witt, i. 194.

convention, 167 - 170 ; statement
Clinton, George, i. 194.

about the cabinet, 235.
Cobb, Howell, i. 74; secessionist in- Davis, Garrett, i. 297 ; opposes enlist-

trigues in Georgia, 186 ; in Buchan- ment of negro troops, ii. 16.
an's cabinet, 187 ; his behavior, 188; Davis, Henry Winter, his bill concern-
resigns, 198; argument for seces- ing reconstruction, ii. 231-235, 243;
sion, 183.

manifesto against the President, 235,
Cochrane, John, nominee for Vice- 236 ; hostility to Lincoln, 266.
Presidency, ii. 259.

Davis, Jefferson, i. 226, 234, 264, 393;
Cold Harbor, ii. 281.

and Compromise of 1850, 90; op-
Colfax, Schuyler, i. 297 ; opposes Lin- poses compromise between North

coln in 1858, 116 ; ii. 327; remark and South, 204; chosen President
about Lincoln, 114.

of Confederate States, 205; sends
Collamer, Jacob, i. 74, 297 ; candidate commissioners to Washington, 238;

for Presidential nomination, 169, urged to action, 241, 242 ; reluctant
170.

to be aggressor, 242 ; efforts to in-
Committee on Conduct of War, con- duce Kentucky to secede, 266-268;

cerning army of Potomac, i. 312; offers letters of marque and repri-
its creation and composition, 321, sal, 282; attack on East Tennessee-
322; insists on corps - formation, ans, 352 ; ii. 153 ; believes Kentucky
344; hostility to McClellan, 342; to be disloyal, 154 ; his escape de-
ii. 65; concerning army of the sired, 239 ; appoints Hood in place
Potomac, 70.

of Johnston, 284; reception of F.
Committee of Thirteen, i, 202.

P. Blair, 305; appoints commission-
Committee of Thirty-three, i. 201, 202, ers, 306; notified that Richmond
210.

must be surrendered, 331, 334 ; es-
Compromise of 1850, i. 89-93; com- capes, 335, 341 ; charged with com-

plicity in assassination conspiracy, Ericsson, John, i. 356.
353.

Evarts, W. M., i. 171.
Dayton, W. L., nominated for Vice- “Evening Journal” (of Albany), atti-

Presidency, i. 101; candidate for tude concerning secession, i. 193.

nomination in 1860, 166, 169, 170. “Evening Post” (of New York), i. 155.
Dennison, William, enters cabinet, Everett, Edward, nominated for vice-
ii. 289.

presidency, i. 166; attitude of his
Dickinson, D. S., ii. 265.

supporters, 175, 194; at Gettys-
Dix, John A., concerning secession of burg, ii. 215.

New York city, i. 197 ; in Buchan- Ewell, R. S., ii. 143, 144.
an's cabinet, 201.

“Examiner,” The (of Richmond),
Donelson, Andrew J., i. 100.

quoted, i. 209.
Donelson, Fort, captured, i. 354.
Doolittle, J. R., i. 297.

Fair Oaks, battle at, ii. 58, 59.
Douglas, Stephen A., i. 68, 77, 97 ; first | Farragut, D. G., captures New Or-

meeting with Lincoln, 43; in cam- leans, i. 358 ; at Vicksburg, 359,
paign of 1840, 61 ; praises Missouri 364 ; takes Mobile, ii. 285.
Compromise, 83 ; efforts to repeal Fell, J. W., i. 161.
Missouri Compromise, 94, 107 ; en- Felton, S. M., statements concerning
deavors to defend his action, 95, 96 ; Lincoln's journey to Washington,
charges Lincoln with a political i. 212-214, 217 n.
trade about the Senatorship, 98; Fenton, R. E., i. 297.
Southern favorite for Presidential Fessenden, W. P., i. 296; remark
nomination in 1856, 101 ; position about decision in the Dred Scott
in the Democratic party and before Case, 128 n. ; Secretary of the Treas-
the country, 106-110, 113; quarrels ury, ii. 254, 255.
with Buchanan about Kansas, 108; Fillmore, M., nominated for presi-
opposes the “English bill," 109; dency, i. 100; the vote for him,
Democratic candidate for Senate in 102.
1858, 114; and as such opposed by Florida, the privateer, ii. 172, 173.
many Democrats and befriended by Floyd, J. B., in Buchanan's Cabinet,
many Republicans, 116, 117; in the i. 187, 188; behavior, opinions and
joint debates of 1858, 121 et seq. ; resignation, 198, 199, 208; concern-
his ultimate success, 149; his per- ing the navy, 283.
sonal triumph, 149; subsequent Foote, A. H., i. 333; at Fort Henry,
speeches in Ohio, 151 ; comments 354.
on his speeches, 157, 158; before Ford's “History of Illinois," sketch
the Democratic nominating conven- of bench and bar, i. 29; remarks on
tion, 1800, 163; nominated, 164 ; Lincoln, 54.
position in Democratic party, 1860, Forney, J. W., ii. 263.
165 ; in campaign of 1860, 174, 180 Forquer, G., anecdote, i. 51.
n. ; opposed by extremist Southern- Fort Pillow, ii. 143.
ers in the campaign, 175 ; sustains Fox, G. V., and Fort Sumter, i. 245,
Lincoln when Sumter is attacked, 246.
251.

Franklin, W. B., concerning advance
Draft, act for, and proceedings there- in Virginia, i. 323-325, 330, 336;

under, 195–199; riot in New York, joins McClellan on Peninsula, ii. 47,
198.

48.

Fredericksburg, battle of, ii. 136, 137.
Early, Jubal A., i. 339; raid against Fremont, John C., candidate for presi-

Washington, ii. 282–284; in Shenan- dency, i. 101, 102 ; in Department
doal Valley, 285.

of the West, 349-351 ; issues order
Edwards, Mrs. Ninian W., i. 62-64. freeing slaves, ii. 6, 7, 102; in moun-
Edwards, Ninian W., i. 68.

tains of Virginia, 35; at time of
Emancipation Proclamation, ii. 205, Jackson's foray, 55, 56 ; resigns, 74;

207, 222; the preliminary proclama- the effort to make him a candidate
tion, 114-121; its political effect, for the presidency, 255-260.
122 et seq.; final proclamation, 130, Fremont, Mrs. J. C., visit to Lincoln,
132; English opinion about it, 132 ; i. 350.
comments, 316, 317.

Fugitive Slave Law, i. 88, 91, 132,
English, James E., i. 297 ; his famous 143.

bill, 109, 110; votes for Constitu-
tional Amendment abolishing slav- Gaines's Mill, battle at, ii. 62.
ery, ii. 326.

Garrison, W. L., i. 191; in autumn of

« AnteriorContinuar »