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FARM AND GARDEN.

The value of the products of the farm and garden, and the cost of operating the same during the year 1878, were as follows: Cash value of crops raised.....

$8,567 86 Cash sales of surplus and useless property on account of farm

8 08 Total receipts...

8,575 94 Cash expended on account of farm and garden $4, 845 44 Bought of home on account of farm and garden.. 2,182 38 Gross expenditures on account of farm and garden.....

$7,027 82 Less amount expended for permanent improvement, to wit: Cash for purchase of 6,437 feet of drain pipe.

$324 50 Cash for labor in putting down 6,437 feet of drain pipe.. 289 66 Cash for stone to build 1,128 feet of stone drain

24 75 Cash for labor in building 1,128 feet of stone drain 101 52 Cash for labor in relaying 2,611 feet drain pipe...... 130 55

870 98

Current expenditures to carry on farm and garden....

6, 156 84 Net profits of farm and garden....

2, 419 10 Market value of crop raised, 1873, $8,748.39; net profit of farm, $3,504.37. Market value of crop raised, 1874, $9,193.90; net profit of farm, $2,150.00. Market value of crop raised, 1875, $9,414.10; net profit of farm, $3,404.31. Market value of crop raised, 1876, $7,581.07 ; net profit of farm, $2,037.91. Market value of crop raised, 1877, $8,488.63; net profit of farm, $2,903.37. Market value of crop raised, 1878, $8,567.86; net profit of farm, $2,419.10. Market value of crop raised, 6 years, $51,993.95; net profit of farm, $16,419.05. Expended for permanent improvement of farm during last 6 years, $9,264.09.

The following tabular statement exhibits in detail the products of the farm and garden and the value and disposition of each article produced :

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$27 75

3 40 57 00 73 00 604 15 199 50

202)

.bushels.. Cucumbers ...do.. Currants

.do. Firewood .cords.. Fodder..

tons..
Gooseberries .. bushels..
Greens. -pounds..
Hay.
Hay (green) .do
Ice.
Lettuce

pounds.. Mangel wurzel. .tons.. Oats

.bushels.. Onions

..do.... Parsnips.

do Pasturing cattle..heads.. Pasturing sheep ... do Pease (green)... bushels. Potatoes

..do....

794 623 49 70 13 100 13 00 2023

350 708 50 30 400 120 00

11 100 11 00 1, 205 01 12 05 291 7502, 182 50

46 400 184 00 250 300 750 00 1, 616

04 64 64 178 1000 177 50 2, 080

24 499 20 524 50 to 75 364 37 2133 50 106 50

42 500 210 00 261 100 261 00

68 125 85 00
1,446 25 to 70 699 70

793 49 70
13 13 00

708 50
30 120 00

11 11 00 1, 205

12 05 2912, 182 50

184 00

750 00 1, 616 64 64

174 177 50
2, 080 499 20

524 364 37
213) 106 50

42 210 00
261 261 00

68 85 00 1, 446 699 70

8 00 352 95 49 70 13 00 708 50 120 00 11 00

12 05 2,182 50

184 00 750 00 64 64. 177 50 499 20 364 37 106 50 210 00 261 00

85 00 699 70

... tons..

.do.

46 250

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I certify that the foregoing statement of “Products of farm and garden" is a correct abstract from the books in my office.

W. H. LOUGH,

Secretary.

SHOPS. The following table exhibits the number of mechanical trades carried on at this branch during the year 1878, with number of men employed in each shop, amount of expenditure, value of products, and net profits in each, to wit:

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Blacksmith shop
Broom shop
Carpenter shop..
Harness shop
Paint shop
Printing office and bookbindery.
Shoe shop
Tin shop.

CLOTHING. The rule for issuing clothing at this branch has been modified during the year, and is now as follows: Each beneficiary when admitted to the Home for the first time is given clothing to the value of $15, and sixty days afterwards he is given clothing to the value of $6.55, making the value of his admission suit, for which no charge is made, $21.55; subsequently, if he requires it, he is allowed clothing to the value of $24.37 per year; and if he has an income from pension or extra duty, or both, exceeding $5 per month, he is required to pay for it; otherwise it is donated to him. The following table exhibits the kind, quantity, and value, as fixed by General Orders of the War Department for 1871, of all clothing issued during the year:

[graphic]

Blouses, lined
251 33 37 284 525 $1, 118 25 80

$170 40

605 $1,288 65 Blouses, lined, extra. 2 6 2 5 12 49 80

3 12 45 15 62 25 Blouses, unlined

100 124

208

368 16 16 28 32 224 396 48 Boots, extra, pairs.

2 3 7

1 2 50 11 27 50 12 30 00 Boots, pairs 51 22 6 25 81 167 67 23 47 61

104 215 28 Caps, forage. 142 87 100 161

440 193 60 50 22 00 490 215 60 Coats, uniform 152 52 56 75

307 1, 703 85

28

155 40 335 Coats, uniform, extra

1, 859 25 4 1 1 6

9 87 75

3 29 25 12 117 00 Coats, great

92
1 150

1, 225 90 13 69 29 243 1, 295 19 Dravers, pairs 489 214 277 512

1,318 830 44
174 109 38

939 82 Frocks, fatigue.

5
5
4 65

5

4 65 Hats, uniform 104 49 45 48

242 242 00

4 4 00 246 246 00 Overalls, pairs. 71 48 30 23

163
177 67

9

9 81 172 187 48 Shirts, cotton. 10 11 2 3

24 18 00

2
1 50 26

19 50 Shirts, knit

539 231

326

556 1, 520 1,520 00 132 132 00 Shoes, pairs

1, 652 1, 652 00 317 154 168 257 818 981 60 78 93 60

896 Socks, pairs.

1,075 20 696 318 373 678

1, 840
483 12 225 59 73

2, 065

542 85 Trousers, pairs

298
155

189 296 818 1, 717 80 120 252 00 938 Trousers, pairs, extra

1, 969 80 6 2 3 7 28 70

16 40 11 43 10 Ponchos

1
1 2 63

1

2 63 Slippers, hospital 49

100
149 54 90

149 54 90 Dark-blue cloth, yards 6 6

32 04 12

32 04 Sky blue kersey, yard

147 343 12 10 50

371
32 59

491 43 09 Chevrons.. 4

4
1 64

1 64 Total...

10, 991 13

1, 305 27

12, 296 40 Value of clothing issued during first quarter, $4,298.36; second quarter, $1,760.26 ; third quarter, $2,064.14; fourth quarter, $4,173. 64.

LAUNDRY. The work of the Home laundry, in which six men were regularly employed during the year, has been as follows:

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1,800

209 1, 103 683

40 18, 434

265 1, 674

943 37, 100 36, 880 10, 696 24, 845

851 15, 428 26, 284

220 83

SANITARY REGULATIONS.

Beneficiaries of this branch are required to bathe not less frequently than once a week; and the company sergeants and hospital steward are charged with the duty of enforcing strict obedience to this rule.

DISCIPLINE.

The most unwelcome as well as the most imperative duties devolving upon the commanding officer of the Home are those connected with the maintenance of necessary discipline among the beneficiaries. These delicate and responsible offices should be exercised without fear or favor, and not in accordance with Beccaria's pernicious fallacy, “the greatest good of the greatest number," under which theory any act of barbarism or injustice may be sanctioned so long as the majority is not injuriously affected thereby, but in accordance with the more enlightened sentiment, “the greatest good of the whole number," which recognizes all persons as equally entitled to the protection of the State, and to attain this end, permits the natural rights of every individual to be in some measure abridged. Therefore, in an institution like this, regulations requiring inmates to conform to certain rules in their dormitories and at the table, to observe habits of cleanliness and order, to be present at stated rollcalls, and to repair to their quarters at certain hours, prohibiting inebriation, vulgarity, and boisterous conduct, &c., are indispensable, although they are in fact abridgments of natural rights. Generally, the beneficiaries of this Home cheerfully conform to the regulations established for their government, but in some instances the rules can be enforced only by the imposition upon offenders of adequate penalties, which are restricted to fines, laboring without pay, and confinement for limited periods in the guard-house. Fines are occasionally remitted for long-continued exemplary conduct, or for the benefit of dependent families, and in the exercise of his discretion the commanding officer has, during the year 1878, remitted penalties to the amount of $594.91.

The following tabular statement exhibits the number and nature of offenses committed against the discipline of the Home during the year 1878, by pensioners and by non-pensioners and the amount of penalties imposed upon each class, to wit:

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The whole number of pensioners in the Home during the year was 536, of which 262, or 49 per cent., committed 1,757 offenses, and 274 committed no offenses The whole number of non-pensioners in the Home during the year was 763, of which 323, or 42 per cent., committed 1,265 offenses, and 449 committed no offenses. The following tabular statement exhibits the number of offenses committed by each beneficiary during the year, to wit:

Total.

53 47 70 34 96

1 man committed 53 offenses 1 man committed 47 offenses 2 men committed 35 offenses 1 man committed 34 offenses 3 men committed 32 offenses 1 man committed 29 offenses 1 man committed 28 offenses 1 man committed 26 offenses 2 men committed 23 offenses 2 men committed 22 offenses 2 men committed 21 offenses 7 men committed 19 offenses 7 men committed 18 offenses 3 men committed 17 offenses 4 men committed 16 offenses 5 men committed 15 offenses 5 men committed 14 offenses. 13 men committed 13 offenses

7 men committed 12 offenses 10 men committed 11 offenses

5 men committed 10 offenses 19 men committed 9 offenses 23 men committed 8 offenses 21 men committed 7 offenses 22 men committed 6 offenses 40 men committed 5 offenses 48 men committed 4 offenses 64 men committed 3 offenses 92 men committed 2 offenses 173 men committed 1 offense

26 46 44 42 133 126 51 64 75 70 169

84 110

50 171 181 147 132 200 192 192 184 173

Total ......

3,022 Seven hundred and fourteen inmates committed no offenses.

Of twelve hundred and ninety-nine beneficiaries who have been cared for in this branch during the year 1878, 714 have committed no offense against the discipline of the Home or the laws of the land; and 173 have committed but one offense each. Considering the fact that the beneficiaries of the Home are separated from restraining family and domestic influences, and that few of the offenses recorded against them here would

enerally be considered as offenses against public policy, the record of their deportment cannot but be gratifying to and challenge the admiration of all friends of the institution. It is, indeed, rarely that an agri. cultural horse-trot, an outdoor political gathering, a religious campmeeting, or any village containing 1,000 male adults, is not daily vexed with more of inebriety and disorder than is ever found at this Home.

DISHONORABLE DISCHARGES.

As an ultimate means of preserving discipline, it sometimes becomes the imperative duty of the commandant, with the approval of the president of the Board of Managers, to expel incorrigible offenders from the Home. In the exercise of this discretion, after repeated warnings and great forbearance in each case, 22 beneficiaries have been dishonorably discharged from this branch during the year, for offenses as follows:

Incorrigible drunkenness, repeated absence without leave, and general misconduct, 7.

Habitual' drunkenness and absence without leave, lounging about liquor saloons in the vicinity of the Home, and refusing to perform labor

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