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3d Session.

I No. 26.

REMOVAL OF OBSTRUCTIONS IN THE MISSOURI RIVER.

MEMORIAL

OF THE

LEGISLATURE OF DAKOTA TERRITORY,

PRAYING

An appropriation for the removal of obstructions in the Missouri River.

FEBRUARY 22, 1879.-Referred to the Committee on Commerce and ordered to be

printed.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Yankton, February 17, 1879. SIR: I have the honor to send herewith a memorial of the legislature of the Territory of Dakota, with the request that you will lay the same before your honorable body. Very respectfully yours,

JOHN R. JACKSON,

Speaker of the House. The SPEAKER of the House of Representatives,

Washington, D. C.

To the honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the United

States in Congress assembled : Your memorialists, the legislative assembly of the Territory of Dakota, recognizing the liberal policy of the general government respecting its Territories, in developing their resources and promoting the prosperity, would most respectfully represent that, owing to obstructions in the channel of the Missouri River at and near Vermillion, large tracts of land are rendered almost worthless by overflows occasioned by said obstructions, and by washing away of its banks. Your memorialists do there. fore most respectfully but earnestly request that an appropriation of $10,000 be made at the present session of Congress for the purpose of removing the obstructions from the channel of said river, and of reclaim

ing the lands now rendered worthless by overflow; the same to be expended under the direction of some competent officer to be selected by the government. And this your memorialists as in duty bound will ever pray.

JOHN R. JACKSON,

Speaker of the House. GEORGE H. WALSH,

President of the Council.

Attest:
T. A. KINGSBURY,

Chief Clerk of the House.
Attest:
A. 0. HUBBURD,

Chief Clerk of the Council.

This memorial originated in the house of representatives, and is known on the records as H. F. No. 23.

T. A. KINGSBURY,

Chief Clerk.

0

3d Session.

No. 27.

ADDITIONAL IMPROVEMENTS OF THE YELLOWSTONE AND

MISSOURI RIVERS.

MEMORIAL

OF THE

LEGISLATURE OF MONTANA TERRITORY,

ASKING

For additional improvements of the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers.

FEBRUARY 28, 1879.-Referred to the Committee on Commerce and ordered to be

printed.

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF MONTANA,

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Helena, Mont., February 12, 1879. SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith house joint memorial No. 2, in relation to the improvement and repair of the Mullen Road; also house joint memorial No. 9, for additional improvements on the Yellowstone and Upper Missouri Rivers. Respectfully,

JAS. E. KANOUSE,

Chief Clerk. The SPEAKER of the House of Representatives,

Washington, D. O

To the Senate and House of Representatives in Congress assembled :

Your memorialists, the legislative council and house of representatives of the Territory of Montana, respectfully show unto your honorable bodies that the populations and industries of the Territory of Montana are rapidly increasing, and that the tonnage of imports as well as exports is much larger each succeeding year. Our lines of communication with the markets of the country are long, and their condition heretofore has operated to retard the growth and burden the industries of our Territory. The Upper Missouri River is navigable to the Rocky Mountains, and for one hundred and fifty miles along the base of said mountains above the Great Falls of said river, and one or more steamboats are now in course of construction at Pittsburg, which will be placed on said portion of said river during the coming season.

The increasing use of this river as a highway of commerce dictates that its navigability be improved. Above the Great Falls there are a number of places where a small sum of money would remove obstruc

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tions, and render its use for the purposes of commerce of great value to our people. This river is destined to be the highway over which the citizens of the northern portion of the Territory will receive their heavy freights, and its improvement is the dictate of wisdom, as it is a neces. sity of our situation.

Equally useful to the people of the southern portion of this Territory is the Yellowstone River, which penetrates that region with its navigable waters for several hundred miles in length, and which, notwithstanding several rapids of considerable difficulty, has been utilized during the past year for the purposes of commerce by steamboats with considerable cargoes of merchandise for our people. If, added to these considerations, we shall recall to you the considerable military posts and Indian agencies which derive their supplies by means of these lines of communication, the rapidly-increasing settlements along them, and the interest which the general government has heretofore evinced in the commerce of the country, we shall present good reason for asking you to make appropriations for the improvement of these particular streams at the points indicated. And, as in duty bound, your memorialists will ever pray, &c.

SAMUEL WORD,

Speaker House of Representatires. ARMISTEAD H. MITCHELL,

President of the Council.

3d Session.

No. 28.

I

NATIONAL HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS.

ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

BOARD OF MANAGERS OF THE NATIONAL HOME FOR DISABLED

VOLUNTEER SOLDIERS FOR THE YEAR 1878.

FEBRUARY 28, 1879.-Referred to the Committee on Military Affairs and ordered to

be printed.

To the honorable Senate and House of Representatives in Congress assembled :

The Board of Managers of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, in compliance with the act of Congress requiring an annual report of the management of the trusts confided to them to Congress, beg leave to submit the following:

Referring to our former reports made to Congress, and reiterating the recommendations therein made for the instruction of Congress as to the condition of the National Home, we add, the board has found during the year largely increased calls upon the resources confided to them for the support of a much larger number of soldiers who have claims under the act establishing our institution, than ever before, and our accommodations have been taxed to their utmost capacity to take care of and make comfortable those soldiers who have been adjudicated by us to come within the purview of the act. But we can say, what has always been a matter of pride to us, that no soldier entitled to the benefits of the insti. tation, who has ever made application, has been turned away.

As time passes, it becomes more and more difficult to determine whether the disabilities of any given applicant are proven to have arisen solely from wounds or sickness received in line of duty. As age advanees, many who served through the war find themselves totally disabled; and while it is apparent that age had to do with their disabilities, it is likewise so highly probable that the disabilities are premature from hardships of the service that their cases appeal to us strongly to presume that a man who was mustered into service after a medical examination as a well and sound man, and who now is shown to have had sickness in the Army from which he apparently recovered, but is now afflicted with disabilities which may in natural course be fairly traceable and deduceable from that sickness, that we have felt obliged where a long term of service is shown, an honorable discharge given, a premature decrepitude by age, or diseases breaking out afresh of like character to those suffered while in the service, to conclude that such may fairly be determined to be the sequela of such sickness; and the board in their discretion have felt it their duty to resolve the doubts in such cases largely in favor of the applicant.

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