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Q. What had Temple said to him just before that ?-A. That Brayton was a good fellow. Field's statement was, “Brayton is a good man, and you need not worry; we will make a favorable report."

Q. Were those the words ?-A. Those were the words, as nearly as I can possibly recollect.

Q. Do you recollect that those were the words or not?-A. I do; those were the words. Q. You cannot be mistaken about that ?-A. I do not think I am.

By the CHAIRMAN: Q. Are you in the babit of being cross-examined in courts or before committees A. I never have been before a committee of investigation in my life and never have been a witness in court but once.

The CHAIRMAN. I feel it due to you to call your attention to the fact that under Mr. Canpon’s examination you have been testifying accurately to the minutes of conversation, and whether your recollection about the exact minute that any particular question was asked or answered is correct or not, you are positive as to the substance f not the exact language wbich Mr. Field used in reply to Mr. Temple's question ?-A. I am.

Q. And you state here that Field did state to Mr. Temple that be, Temple, need not give himself any uneasiness in regard to it, as they would make a favorable roport for the Providence postmaster 1-A. Yes, sir.

The chairman announced that the investigation was closed and that all the witnesses were discharged.

Adjourned.

INDEX.

Page.
Charges preferred by J. S. Temple...

1
Answer of Thomas P. Cheney .

6
Testimony of George S. Blunt.

11, 15, 30, 44
James B. Backap.

24
A. T. Stahl...

.24-120
John L. Lewis..

31
William S. West.

34,56
J. S. Temple.....

36
Henry Chickering

45
James L. Wilson...

48
William Conn

50
John Smith, jr.

58
Wilbam L. Burt.

65
Hugh Daly ...

72
Duties, &c., of superintendents—Communication from the Postmaster-General. 75
Testimony of N. D. Sperry...

78
Theodore N. Vail

86
Charles Field...

.93, 101, 114
W.H. Bigelow.

96
J. E. Larkin..

101, 105
James F. Briggs.

103
E. G. Pierce

104
Joseph B. Manly

105
A. H. Tuttle..

106
E. T. Rowell

107
Milo V. Bailey

108
E. G. Bid well.

115
Henry W. Blair

116
Frank C. Emery

117
B. H. Camp

118
Letter from Ex-Governor Cheney

122
Testimony of Thomas P. Cheney

122
Letters from Charles H. Morgan and John Smith, jr ..

132
Testimony of S. W. Rollins....

133
Testimony of John Deveraux

136

3d Session.

No. 25.

INTER-STATE COMMERCE.

RESOLUTIONS

OF THE

VIRGINIA STATE GRANGE, PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY,

IN FAVOR OF

The passage of the bill to regulate inter-State commerce and to prohibit dis

crimination by common carriers.

FEBRUARY 22, 1879.--Referred to the Committee on Commerce and ordered to be

printed.

RICHMOND, VA., February 19, 1879. DEAR SIR: Please find inclosed action of the Virginia State Grange in reference to the question of transportation, which I am directed to forward to you for proper reference to the House of Representatives. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. W. HAZLEWOOD,

Secretary. The Hon. SPEAKER of the House of Representatives,

Washington, D. C.

[Extract from proceedings of Virginia State Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. Session

at Norfolk, Va., February 12, 1879.] The following resolution was unanimously adopted :

Resolved, That the State Grange of Virginia, impressed with the justice and equity of the provisions of the substitute to House bill 3547 presented by Mr. Reagan, of Texas, and entitled “A bill to regulate interState commerce and to prohibit unjust discrimination by common carriers," respectfully but earnestly petition a favorable consideration of said bill by the Congress of the United States, for the following reasons :

1st. The freight charges on all of our through lines of transportation are whimsical, and subject to unjust, unreasonable, and violent fluctuations.

21. Terminal points are invariably accorded discriminations prejudi. cial to all intermediate points, thereby compelling producers and consumers of one section to pay the transportation bills of another section of the country:

3d. Railroads are common carriers, built by the people for the common weal, and should not be tolerated as arbitrary and crushing monopolies.

Ath. Competition among parallel lines is no longer a safeguard against monopoly, for organized combination effectually establishes the one and defeats the other, to the great injury of the commerce of the country.

5th. Speculators are allowed rebates and drawbacks to such an extent that large capitalists can buy the products of the West at a higher price, and sell the same at a lower price in the Eastern markets, and yet realize a larger marginal profit than the honest shipper of more limited means.

6th. Congress alone has power to grapple with these mammoth monopolies, who, by reason of their magnitude, either defy or evade the laws of individual States.

A copy-Teste: (SEAL.]

M. W. HAZLEWOOD,

Secretary.

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