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AN ILLUSTRATED RECORD

IN EIGHT VOLUMES

VOLUME IV - PART I

FROM THE AGE OF JOHNSON TO THE

AGE OF TENNYSON

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COPYRIGHT, 1904,
BY THE MACMILLAN COMPANY.

Set up and electrotyped, Published January, 1904. Reprinted
October, 1905 ; September, 1906 ; October, 1908.

Norwood Press
7. S. Cusbing & Co. - Berwick & Smith Co.

Norwood, Mass., U.S. A.

PREFACE TO THE FOURTH VOLUME

The principles of selection which were followed in the earlier volumes of this work have been adhered to in this also, except in the last chapter, where it was found necessary in some degree to modify them. The age through which we have just passed is still too close to us to enable us to decide with any confidence which, among the many names which were prominent in the second rank of its literature, will continue to interest posterity. Instead, therefore, of crowding the page with eminent names, certain leading figures have been taken as unquestionably in themselves attractive, and as probably representative of the time. This portion of the work, it is obvious, must be peculiarly liable, in future editions, to extension and alteration. At present, its limit is the death of Queen Victoria, and it deals with no living person, except with one famous and venerable philosopher, whose work, we must regretfully suppose, is finished.

So far as the illustration of this volume is concerned, we descend through grades of picturesque decline to the period, not merely of the frock-coat and of the top-hat, but of that most inæsthetic instrument, the photographer's lens. We may claim, perhaps, to make up in copiousness for a lack of beauty which is no fault of ours. Among those whose kindness and generosity have enabled us to enrich this volume, my particular thanks are due to Jr. William Archer, to Mr. Arthur Christopher Benson, to Mr. Ernest H. Coleridge, to Mr. Coningsby. D’Israeli, to Mr. Warwick Draper, to Mrs. John Richard Green, to Miss Gaskell, to Mr. John Murray, to Mrs. Richmond Ritchie, to Mr. Clement Shorter, to Mr. M. H. Spielmann, to Mrs. Baird Smith, to Messrs. Smith, Elder and Co., and to Mr. Butler Wood of Bradford. As before, I have to thank my friend Mr. A. H. Bullen for his kindness in reading the proofs and Mrs. Sydney Pawling for her valuable help in obtaining matter for illustration.

E. G.

November 1903.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER I

THE AGE OF WORDSWORTH-1780-1815

CowperTable TalkJohn GilpinThe Task-Crabbe—The Parish RegisterThe Borough

—Tales of the HallBlake—Songs of Innocence--His Visions—Burns—Early Life-Poems
in the Scottish Dialect Tam o' Shanter His Friendships and Love-affairs — Scotch
Doric Verse — The Four Great Poets of the Eighties - Minor Poets- Erasmus
Darwin - Thomas Russell — W. L. Bowles — The Publication of Lyrical Ballads
– One of the Greatest Events in Literature – Wordsworth and Coleridge — The
Importance of their Influence— The Wordsworths at Grasmere— Friendship with
Scott and Sir George Beaumont — Later Life and Work — Death in 1850 –
Coleridge-Friendship with Wordsworth and SoutheyThe Ancient Mariner-Christabel
-His Troubles in Old Age-Southey—The Beauties of his Character not always
reflected in his Poetry-Campbell—The Pleasures of HopeLord Ullin's Daughter-
Scott-Considered as a PoetThe Lay of the Last MinstrelMarmionThe Lady of the
Lake-Early Life and Education-Friendship with Ballantyne-His Tremendous
Activity and Tireless Brain-His Death in 1832—Burk:--The Extraordinary Ardour
and Enthusiasm of his WritingsInquiry into the Sublime and Beautiful— Letters to a
Noble LardThe Regicide Peace —Godwin-Mary Wollstonecraft—The Rights of Women

- Mrs. Radcliffe—M. G. Lewis --Beckford-Holcroft-- Hannah More-Fanny Burney-
Maria Edgeworth--Jane AustenHer Place in LiteraturePride and PrejudiceSense and
SensibilityEmma—Scott's article in the Quarterly Review, The Reviews—Lord Jeffrey

- Napier-Sydney Smith-Cobbett-Combe-Bentham, Isaac D'Israeli-Mackintosh
-Dugald Stewart—Scott's Novels—Their Perennial Freshness and Variety—A Heritage
of the English-speaking Race

Pp. 1-106

CHAPTER II

THE AGE OF BYRON, 1815-1840

Innocence and Purity of the Age of Wordsworth-Revolutionary Tendency of the later

Generation-Poetry of Crime and Chaos—Byron-His Fascinating and Mysterious
Personality—The Merits and Defects of his Writings—His Life and Unhappy Marriage
– Travels Abroad–The Countess Guiccioli—Journey to Greece—His Death at Misso-
longhi—Shelley–His Short and Feverish Life-His Proper Place among the Great
Poets—Friendship with Byron-His Marriage-His Life Abroad–His Death—The
Cockney School-Leigh Hunt-His Writings and Friendships—Keats—His Short Life
-The Extraordinary Perfection of his Production -One of the Greatest Poets of any
Country–His many Interesting Friendships—His Death-Reynolds—Wells—Thomas
MooreIrish MelodiesRogersThe Pleasures of MemoryItuly—A New School of Critics
-Lamb-One of the most Beloved of English Authors—His Sufferings and Sorrows-

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