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Printed by T. K. & P... Collins. THE

POETICAL WORKS

OF

GEORGE CRABBE.

Contents.

.. 210

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MEMOIR OF THE REV. GEORGE CRABBE Page v

XII. Squire Thomas; or, the Precipitate POEMS:

Choice

... 183 XIII. Jesse and Colin ......

186 THE VILLAGE

13 THE PARISH REGISTER.

191

XIV. The Struggles of Conscience
Part I. Baptisms

18

XV. Advice; or, the Squire and the Priest 195

XVI. The Confidant
Part II. Marriages

*.. 198
25
XVII. Resentment

.. 203 Part 11I. Burials

29
XVIII. The Wager

.. 207 THE LIBRARY

38

XIX. The Convert
THE NEWSPAPER

43
XX. The Brothers

214 THE BIRTH OF FLATTERY .....

48
XXI. The Learned Boy

218 REFLECTIONS UPON THE SUBJECT

51 SIR EUSTACE GREY

52 TALES OF THE HALL: THE HALL OF JUSTICE

56
BOOK I. The Hall

225 WOMAN!

58
1. The Brothers .....

228 III. Boys at School

230 THE BOROUGH:

IV. Adventures of Richard

233 LETTER I. General description

66
V. Ruth

238 II. The Church

69

VI. Adventures of Richard concluded .. 242
III. The Vicar- The Curate, etc.

71
VII. The Elder Brother

.. 245 IV. Sects and Professions in Religion 74

VIII. The Sisters

.. 252 V. Elections

79
IX. The Preceptor Husband

260 VI. Professions-Law

81
X. The Old Bachelor

263 VII. Professions--Physic

84
XI. The Maid's Story

.. 268 VIII. Trades

87
XII. Sir Owen Dale.

.. 279 IX. Amusements

89
XIII. Delay has Danger

287 X. Clubs and Social Meetings

92
XIV, The Natural Death of Love

294 XI. Inns

96
XV, Gretna Green

297 XII. Players

99
XVI. Lady Barbara; or, the Ghost

301 XIII. The Almis-House and Trustees .. 102

XVII. The Widow

310 XIV, Inhabitants of the Alms-House

XVIII. Ellen ......

... 315 Blaney

105
XIX. William Bailey

.. 318 XV. Inhabitants of the Alms-House-Clelia 107

XX. The Cathedral Walk

324 XVI. Inhabitants of the Alms-House-Ben

XXI. Smugglers and Poachers

328 bów

109
XXII. The Visit concluded .

334 XVII. The Hospital and Governors

111 XVIII. The Poor and their Dwellings

114 POSTHUMOUS POEMS: XIX. The Poor of the Borough—The Parish

TALE I. Silford Hall; or, the Happy Boy .. 339
Clerk

117
II. The Family of Love

.. 346 XX. The Poor of the Borough--Ellen Orford 120

III. The Equal Marriage

355 XXI. The Poor of the Borough-Abel Keene 123

IV. Rachel ...

358 XXII. The Poor of the Borough -- Peter

V. Villars

359 Grimes

126

VI. The Farewell and Return
XXIII. Prisons

130
VII. The School Fellow

365 XXIV. Schools.

133
VIII. Barnaby; The Shopman

366 IX. Jane

.. 367 TALES:

X. The Ancient Mansion

369 TALE I. The Dumb Orators; or, The Benefit

XI. The Merchant

371 of Society

140
XII. The Brother Burgesses

... 372 II. The Parting Hour

144
XIII. The Dean's Lady.

. 373 III. The Gentleman Farmer

148
XIV. The Wife and Widow

375 IV. Procrastination

153
XV. Belinda Waters

376 V. The Patron

156
XVI. The Dealer and Clerk

377 VI. The Frank Courtship

162
XVII. Danvers and Rayner

381 VII. The Widow's Tale

166
XVIII. The Boat Race

384 VIII. The Mother

170

XIX. Master William; or, Lad's Love. 387
IX. Arabella ......

173
XX. The Will

389 X. The Lover's Journey

XXI. The Cousins

391 XI. Edward Shore

179
XXII, Preaching and Practice ...

394

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. 363

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. . 176

Memoir of the web. George Cravbe.

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If the humorous observation of Addison were himself had a predilection, as well as his father founded in fact, that a reader seldom peruses a for mathematics; and he made considerable probook with pleasure " till he knows whether the ficiency in the pursuit. writer of it be a black or fair man-of a mild or After leaving this latter school, George was choleric disposition, -with other particulars of the placed as a surgeon's apprentice at Wickhamlike nature,"-we should be in a state of some Brook ; but as this situation was not a very desi. apprehension, since the Rev. George Crabbe, the rable one, he left it, and concluded his apprenticecelebrated author of the poems a new edition of ship with a Mr. Page, surgeon at Woodbridge, a which we here present to the public, has, from market-town about seventeen miles from Aldbo. the modesty and retiredness of his life, furnished rough. Here he met with society congenial to his but few biographical particulars to be developed own disposition, and was by this means introduced to an admiring world. Unlike so many others of to Miss Sarah Elmy, who afterwards became his his genus, he never intermeddled in the turmoils wife. Notwithstanding that he here applied himof politics, or mingled in the intrigues of fashion. self with energy to the studies necessary to a He was, in his manners and feelings, a child of knowledge of his intended profession, he was often nature; though a savant in her dispositions and beguiled into the more flowery fields of poesy, her laws. Contented with keeping the “ noiseless and contributed numerous pieces to the Lady's cenor of his way," with the approbation of his Magazine, a periodical of some repute at that conscience and the approval of his God,-he was period. willing to allow some to be the idol of the factious, About the end of the year 1775, Mr. Crabbe's and others to fawn at the footstool of power ;- term of apprenticeship expired, and he returned satisfied himself with being admired as a poet, to his native village, with the hope of finding revered as a divine,-and respected as a man. means of finishing his professional education in

Our poet was born at Aldborough, on the coast London. But his father's circumstances did not of Suffolk, England, on the Christmas eve of 1754. permit the necessary expenditure, and the youthful His father held the station of salt-master, or col- aspirant was compelled to labour in the drudgery lector of the salt duties, and was a man of strong of the public warehouse wherein his parent's duintellect, vigorous habits of business, and a re- ties were performed. This was in the highest markable faculty of calculation. Early in his degree unpleasant to young Crabbe; and the boyhood, as soon, indeed, as he had learned to irksomeness of his situation was increased by an read, young Crabbe manifested a strong inclina- unhappy change in the habits of his father, who tion towards books of all kinds; and he perused had become a politician, a tavern-haunter, and a with eagerness every thing that came within his domestic tyrant. reach, especially if it were a work of fiction and Mr. Crabbe, at this period, devoted such leisure romance, or treated of witches, fairies, and ghosts. time as was at his disposal, to the study of botany, But he particularly delighted in verse, and began and the advancement of his professional knowat a very early period to imitate the humble spe. ledge; and if he still dallied with the muses, it cimens of poetry which were then accessible to him. was with the persuasion that this was not his

His father observed this bookish disposition, and main pursuit in the progress of life. At length, although he had no higher views for the boy than however, his father was able to afford some slight that of following his own example, and being assistance, and the son journeyed to London with employed in some inferior department of the rev. the view of walking the hospitals and profiting enue service, he resolved to send George to a | by the medical lectures. Ho remained in the school at Bungay, on the borders of Norfolk.-- metropolis about eight or ten months; but his Here he remained for a short time, and was then means were inadequate to an effectual participa removed to a school at Stowmarket, kept by a tion in the advantages which such a residenco skilful mathematician named Haddon. The boy ordinarily affords to the student of medicine; and 1 *

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