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demanding, or receiving gratuities, or donations, commonly called tips, from the public.'

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on License and Miscellany, when appointed.

Mr. Merritt introduced a bill, House Bill No. 144, a bill for "An Act prohibiting the diversion of gratuities, commonly called tips, from the servant or employee to the employer."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on License and Miscellany, when appointed.

Mr. Merritt introduced a bill, House Bill No. 145, a bill for “An Act to amend an Act entitled, “An Act to revise the law in relation to the Department of Agriculture, agricultural societies, and agricultural fairs, and to provide for reports of the same,' approved June 23, 1883, in force July 1, 1883; as amended by subsequent Acts by amending sections one (1) and six (6) thereof."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, when appointed.

Mr. Scanlan introduced a bill, House Bill No. 146, a bill for "An Act to regulate sales of investment securities, supervision of investment companies, and providing penalties for the violation thereof."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Banks, Banking and Building and Loan Associations, when appointed.

Mr. Scanlan introduced a bill, House Bill No. 147, a bill for “An Act to amend section seventy-five (75) of an Act entitled, 'An Act to revise the law in relation to roads and bridges,' approved June 27, 1913, in force July 1, 1913."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Roads and Bridges, when appointed.

Mr. Scanlan introduced a bill, House Bill No. 148, a bill for “An Act concerning larceny and embezzlement of funds and property."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Judiciary, when appointed.

Mr. W. M. Brown introduced a bill, House Bill No. 149, a bill for An Act to amend an Act entitled, 'An Act prohibiting the sale, distribution or gift of malt, spirituous, vinous or intoxicating liquors near the United States Naval Training Schools or Military Posts, and providing a penalty for the violation thereof,' approved May 17, 1907, in force July 1, 1907, by amending sections 1, 2 and 3 thereof."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Temperance, when appointed.

Mr. Gregory introduced a bill, House Bill No. 150, a bill for “An Act to amend an Act entitled, “An Act to revise the law in relation to fences,' approved March 21, 1874, in force July 1, 1874; as amended by subsequent Acts, by amending sections 2, 5, 7 and 11, respectively, thereof."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Roads and Bridges, when appointed.

A message from the Senate by Mr. Eden, Secretary:

Mr. Speaker-I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the Senate has adopted the following preamble and joint resolution, in the

adoption of which I am instructed to ask the concurrence of the House of Representatives, to wit:

SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION No. 9. Resolved, by the Senate, the House of Representatives concurring, That when the two Houses adjourn on Friday, March 5th, they stand adjourned until Wednesday, March 10th, at 10:00 o'clock a. m. Adopted March 4, 1915.

A. E. EDEN, Secretary of the Senate. Mr. Purdunn moved that the House concur with the Senate in the adoption of the foregoing Senate Joint Resolution No. 9,

And the motion prevailed.
Ordered that the Clerk inform the Senate thereof.

Mr. Dudgeon offered the following resolution and asked and obtained unanimous consent for its immediate consideration:

HOUSE RESOLUTION No. 43. Be it resolved, that the State Board of Live Stock Commissioners are hereby required to lay before the House, not later than Wednesday morning, March 10, 1915, all facts, figures, data, names of owners, and numbers of cattle killed and charges for disinfecting premises for all live stock and property destroyed by reason of the foot and mouth disease, giving the names and items of each owner and their several respective losses; and be it further

Resolved, That a certified copy of this resolution be transmitted by the Clerk to the State Board of Live Stock Commissioners.

And the question being, "Shall the resolution be adopted?” it was decided in the affirmative.

A message from the Senate by Mr. Eden, Secretary:

Mr. Speaker-I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the Senate has concurred with them in the adoption of the following preamble and joint resolution, to wit:

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION No. 3.

JOINT RESOLUTION FOR GIVING THE STATE'S ASSENT TO THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF

MAY 8, 1914. WHEREAS, The Congress of the United States has passed an Act approved by the President, May 8, 1914, entitled, “An Act to provide for Co-operative Agricultural Extension Work between the agriculture colleges in the several states receiving the benefits of the Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1862, and of Acts supplementary thereto, and the United States Department of Agriculture;" and,

WHEREAS, It is provided in section 3 of the Act aforesaid, that the grants of money authorized by this Act shall be paid annually to each state which shall by action of its legislature assent to the provisions of this Act;" therefore, be it

Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That the assent of the Legislature of the State of Illinois be, and is hereby given to the provisions and requirements of said Act, and that the trustees of the University of Illinois be, and they are hereby authorized and empowered to receive the grants of money appropriated under said Act, and to organize and conduct agricultural extension work which shall be carried on in connection with the College of Agriculture of the University of Illinois, in accordance with the terms and conditions expressed in the Act of Congress aforesaid. Concurred in by the Senate, March 4, 1915.

A. E. EDEN, Secretary of the Senate. A message from the Senate by Mr. Eden, Secretary:

Mr. Speaker-I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the Senate has passed a bill of the following title, in the passage of which

I am instructed to ask the concurrence of the House of Representatives, to wit:

SENATE BILL No. 1.

A bill for "An Act making an appropriation for the payment of claims arising from loss on account of the slaughter of animals having the foot and mouth disease." Passed by the Senate, March 4, 1915.

A. E. EDEN, Secretary of the Senate. The foregoing Senate Bill No. 1 was taken up, read by title, ordered printed, and to a first reading.

Mr. Rentchler offered the following resolution, and moved its adoption:

HOUSE RESOLUTION No. 44. WHEREAS, By the decree of divine providence, the hand of death has been laid upon and has removed from our midst the Hon. Fred Keck, a member of the Forty-fourth, Forty-fifth, Forty-sixth and Forty-eighth General Assemblies, representing the Forty-ninth Senatorial District; and,

WHEREAS, By his death our State has lost an honest and efficient public officer, the House of Represntatives an honorable and useful member, his constituents one of the best, broadest and most influential citizens and his family one whose memory they, in common with ourselves, and all who knew him feel justly proud of; therefore, be it

Resolved, by the House of Representatives, That deeply deploring his untimely death, we unite with his family, constituents and friends, in their grief, feeling his death to be a personal loss to each of us; and, be it further

Resolved, That this resolution be entered upon the Journal of the House, and that a suitably engrossed copy be forwarded by the Clerk to the family of the deceased, and as a further mark of respect, that the House do now adjourn.

The resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising vote, and in accordance therewith, at the hour of 11:30 o'clock a. m., the House stood adjourned.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 1915, 10:00 O'CLOCK A. M.

The House met pursuant to adjournment,
The Speaker in the chair.
Prayer by the Rev. E. S. Combs.

The Journal of Friday, March 5, was being read, when, on motion of Mr. Weber, the further reading of the same was dispensed with, and it was ordered to stand approved.

A message from the Governor, by William L. Sullivan, Secretary to the Governor:

Mr. Speaker-I am directed by the Governor to lay before the House of Representatives the following communication:

STATE OF ILLINOIS, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

SPRINGFIELD, March 10, 1915. Gentlemen of the Forty-ninth General Assembly:

I respectfully recommend the passage of a law abolishing capital punishment in the State of Illinois.

The strongest, if not the sole logical argument in favor of its retention is that it acts as a deterrent upon the criminal and is therefore a protection to society against the commission of murder. If it proved to be such a deterrent, I would not urge its abolition. Experience in the United States does not sustain the contention. Capital punishment by law has been placed upon and has remained upon the statute books of nearly all of the states of this nation since the inception of their governments. Up to the year 1913, only six states of the United States had abolished the death penalty. In 1913, the state of Washington abolished capital punishment.

U. S. Statistics of 1910 show that five of these states rank among the twenty states having the lowest per capita of homicides, all of these five states having a percentage of less than .08 in each 10,000 inhabitants. The other non-capital punishment state, Kansas, has the same percentage of homicides, 1.01 in 10,000, as have the states of Illinois and Maryland, in both of which capital punishment has been enforced.

The twenty-one states of the Union having the highest percentage of homicides, all of which have a greater percentage per capita than Illinois, Kansas and Maryland, have capital punishment in their criminal codes, and such punishment has been duly enforced.

From the foregoing statement of statistics, it will be seen that the states having a capital punishment law, rạnk as a rule among the states having the greatest percentage of honticides, while those which have abolished capital punishment as a rule rank among those which have the lowest percentage of homicides.

Such condign and repulsive punishment has therefore failed to have a more deterrent effect than imprisonment, in the United States.

Why, then, should capital punishment be longer retained in Illinois ?

In this State of ours, 651 homicides were committed in 1910, after nearly a century's enforcement of this law, while in our neighboring state of Wisconsin, where capital punishment has been abolished, the percentage of homicides has not been much over 50 per cent per capita of those committed in Illinois.

The cold-blooded enforcement of this awful penalty under the forms of law is brutal and abhorrent and wrenches the decent sensibilities of every public official who, by any act or omission, is required by law to participate in its enforcement, including the jurymen who impose the penalty, the judge

who sentences, the Governor who refrains from pardoning, the sheriff who superintends the hanging and the miserable unknown human tool who cuts

the rope.

Taking human life is only justifiable in self-defence. Under the pretence of self-defence, the People of the State of Illinois have been for years taking human life under the forms of law. As a defence of society against murder, judicial taking of human life has proved a failure. It has proved to be no defence.

Imprisonment is equally effective, with less opportunity of irrevocable mistake. “Thou shalt not kill" is the law of Christianity and should be the law of twentieth century humanity.

Let us then, in the name of humanity, replace the punishment of death with the punishment of imprisonment, following the precedent of more humane communities that have not suffered thereby.

Let us put to death, not the wretched convict, but the law which has heretofore taken his life without real advantage to society or the State.

Respectfully submitted,

E. F. DUNNE, Governor. The foregoing message from the Governor was received, and ordered placed on file.

A message from the Governor, by William L. Sullivan, Secretary to the Governor:

Mr. Speaker-I am directed by the Governor to lay before the House of Representatives the following communication:

STATE OF ILLINOIS,
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

SPRINGFIELD, March 10, 1915. Gentlemen of the Forty-ninth. General Assembly:

The Forty-eighth General Assembly adopted a joint res tion authorizing the Governor to appoint a commission of nine members to be known as the Commission on Unemployment of the State of Illinois, said commission to have power and authority to investigate the subject of unemployment of Illinois, together with the causes leading thereto, and the effect of such idleness upon the commonwealth and its citizenship.

Unfortunately, the General Assembly made no appropriation to pay the expenses of the members of the commission.

I endeavored to secure suitable persons to act on the commission but met with little encouragement because of the fact that there was no appropriation available.

Inasmuch as the subject of unemployment is one of paramount importance in the State at this time, I respectfully suggest that the Forty-ninth General Assembly re-enact Senate Joint Resolution No. 28, which was adopted by the Forty-eighth General Assembly, and provide, further, for an appropriation of not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000) to pay the expenses of the members of the commission and such other expenses as may be necessary in the carrying on of the work.

Respectfully submitted,

E. F. DUNNE, Governor. The foregoing message from the Governor, was received, and ordered placed on file.

A message from the Governor, by William L. Sullivan, Secretary to the Governor:

Mr. Speaker-I am directed by the Governor to lay before the House of Representatives the following communication:

STATE OF ILLINOIS, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

SPRINGFIELD, March 10, 1915. Gentlemen of the Forty-ninth General Assembly:

The Congress of the United States passed an Act approved by the President, May 8, 1914, to provide for cooperative agricultural extension work between the agricultural colleges in the several states receiving the

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