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criminal jurisprudence,' approved March 27, 1874, in force July 1, 1874, and all amendments thereto by amending sections 223 and 224 thereof."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Judiciary, when appointed.

Mr. Watson introduced a bill, House Bill No. 57, a bill for "An Act to amend section 1, of 'An Act to authorize the employment of convicts and prisoners in the penal and reformatory institutions of the State of Illinois, in the preparation of road building materials, and in working on the public roads, approved June 28, 1913, in force July 1, 1913."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Industrial Affairs, when appointed.

Mr. Watson introduced a bill, House Bill No. 58, a bill for “An Act to amend an Act entitled, 'An Act to revise the law in relation to criminal jurisprudence,' approved March 27, 1874, in force July 1, 1874, by amending sections 142 and 254

142 and 254 of division I of said Act, and by repealing sections 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 of division XIV of said Act.”

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Judiciary, when appointed.

Mr. Rostenkowski introduced a bill, House Bill No. 59, a bill for “An Act making it unlawful for any person, or persons, not citizens of the United States of America to operate, conduct or manage, or to be in any way financially interested in, as stock holders, owners, partners, or otherwise, of any saloon, dram shop, or other place of business in which, under the law of the State of Illinois, or city ordinance, a license is required to operate, conduct or manage same; rendering null and void any license hereafter issued to a person not a citizen of the United States of America to operate, conduct or manage any saloon, dram shop, or other place of business, in which under the law, a license is required; and providing penalties for violations of the provisions hereof."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Liberal Committee, when appointed.

Mr. McCormick introduced a bill, House Bill No. 60, a bill for "An Act to amend an Act entitled, 'An Act to provide for the holding of primary elections by political parties,' approved March 9, 1910, in force July 1, 1910, as amended by an Act approved May 27, 1912, in force July 1, 1912, as amended by an Act approved and in force March 30, 1912, and as amended by an Act approved June 30, 1913, in force July 1, 1913, by amending sections one (1), two (2), six (6), nine (9), ten (10), twenty-eight (28), thirty (30), thirty-one (31), forty-five (45), fifty-six (56) and sixty-three (63), and repealing section twenty-nine (29) of said Act, and by adding three new sections thereto to be known as sections seventy-eight a (78a), seventy-eight b (78b) and seventyeight c (178c).”

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Elections, when appointed.

Mr. McCormick introduced a bill, House Bill No. 61, a bill for "An Act to amend sections three (3) and fourteen (14) of an Act entitled, 'An Act to provide for the printing and distribution of ballots at public expense, and for the nomination of candidates for public offices, to regulate the manner of holding elections, and to enforce the secrecy of the

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ballot,' approved June 22, 1891, in force July 1, 1891, as amended by subsequent Act.”

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Elections, when appointed.

Mr. McCormick introduced a bill, House Bill No. 62, a bill for "An Act to provide for non-partisan elections for municipal offices.”

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Elections, when appointed.

The Speaker took from his table House Bills numbered 1, 2 and 3 and referred them to the Committee on Appropriations.

The House preceding upon the order of resolutions,
Mr. Devine offered the following resolution and moved its adoption:

HOUSE RESOLUTION No. 31.

Resolved, That John P. Maloney of Sangamon County be named as Third Assistant Doorkeeper of the House, to fill vacancy.

And the resolution was unanimously adopted.

Mr. Garesche offered the following resolution, which was referred, under the rules, to the Committee on Contingent Expenses when appointed:

HOUSE RESOLUTION No. 32.

Resolved, That the Speaker of the House be, and he is hereby empowered and directed to at once appoint Michael S. Giblin as House Messenger, at a salary of six dollars per day.

Said appointment, and the salary attached thereto, to date back to the first day of the convening of the Forty-ninth General Assembly for the reason that said named Michael S. Giblin has been in the House constantly, filling such position for the House since the first day of the present session.

Mr. Devereux offered the following resolution, which was referred, under the rules, to the Committee on Contingent Expenses when appointed:

HOUSE RESOLUTION No. 33.

Resolved, That A. W. Schevers, be and he is hereby appointed to the position of Assistant Messenger of the House.

Mr. Burres offered the following resolution and asked and obtained unanimous consent for its immediate consideration :

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION No. 3. JOINT RESOLUTION FOR GIVING THE STATE'S ASSENT TO THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF

MAY 8, 1914. WHEREAS, The Congress of the United States has passed an Act approved by the President, May 8, 1914, entitled, “An Act to provide for the cooperative agricultural extension work, between the agricultural colleges in the several states, receiving the benefits of the Act of Congress approved July 2, 1862, and of Act supplementary thereto, and the United States Department of Agriculture;" and,

WHEREAS, It is provided in section 3 of the Act aforesaid, that the grants of money authorized by this Act shall be paid annually “to each state which shall by action of its legislature assent to the provisions of this Act;" therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives the Senate concurring therein, That the assent of the Legislature of the State of Illinois be and is hereby

given to the provisions and requirements of said Act, and that the trustees of the University of Illinois be, and they are hereby authorized and empowered to receive the grants of money appropriated under said Act, and to organize and conduct agricultural extension work which shall be carried on in connection with the College of Agriculture of the University of Illinois, in accordance with the terms and conditions expressed in the Act of Congress aforesaid.

And the question being, “Shall the resolution be adopted ?" it was decided in the affirmative.

Ordered that the Clerk inform the Senate thereof, and ask their concurrence therein.

Mr. Lipshulch offered the following resolution, which was referred, under the rules, to the Committee on Industrial Affairs, when appointed.

HOUSE RESOLUTION No. 34. WHEREAS, An unusual number of working people are now compulsorily unemployed in Chicago and other cities and places in the State of Illinois; and,

WHEREAS, Unemployment is one of the greatest misfortunes that can fall upon those obliged to support themselves and those dependent upon them from their earnings; and,

WHEREAS, Also, the unemployment of a large number of the citizens and residents of the city and State is one of the most serious evils from which society can suffer and one of the greatest checks upon the progress and prosperity of the community; therefore, be it

Resolved, By the House of Representatives of the Forty-ninth General Assembly of the State of Illinois, that we deplore the conditions which contribute to the unemployment of wage-earners; deeply sympathize with the unemployed and their families, and desire to exercise the power of the Legislature for the purpose of ameliorating the hardships of the unemployed and for the correction, so far as lies in the power of the Legislature, of the conditions that make for unemployment; be it further

Resolved, By the House of Representatives of the State of Illinois, the State Senate being earnestly requested to concur herein, that a special commission on unemployment be immediately appointed to investigate the matter of unemployment for this session and to report as soon as possible to the General Assembly with such date and recommendations as shall in the judgment of such commission tend to relieve the distress caused by unemployment.

Mr. Weber offered the following resolution, which was referred, under the rules, to the Committee of the Whole House:

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION No. 4. WHEREAS, Experience has proven that under the provisions of the present Constitution of the State of Illinois, it is impossible to secure the relief long demanded by the people of the State; therefore, be it

Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein. That a convention is necessary to revise, alter or amend the Constitution of the State of Illinois, and that the question of calling such convention be submitted to the electors of the State of Illinois, at the next general election, as nearly as practicable in the manner provided by law for the submission of amendments to the Constitution.

Mr. Gorman offered the following resolution and moved its adoption:

HOUSE RESOLUTION No. 35. WHEREAS, The Hon. Michael C. Quinn, whose death occurred on February 1, 1915, was a member of the House of Representatives of the State of Illinois during the Twenty-eighth and Thirty-third sessions of the General Assembly; and

WHEREAS, The deceased was one of the most brilliant of that gifted galaxy of Illinois Irishmen, which includes General, United States Senator, and Supreme Court Justice, James Shields; General James A. Mulligan, of the justly famous Irish Brigade; Governor Thomas Carlin, Governor Thomas Ford, General John A. Logan, Senator Elias Kane, Hon. Joseph Medill, Hon. W. L. D. Ewing, and others who are

"Past the ebbing and the flowing
Past the reaping and the sowing

Past the coming and the going,”
but whose names illumine the records of Illinois and the Nation.

In himself he was a man of extraordinary talents, ability and attainments. The virtue, the fervor, the poetry, the eloquence and the fidelity of the Irish race were typified in him. In capacity and attainments he resembled the great tribune of his race, O'Connell. In manner and stature he was like O'Connell's greatest contemporary, Richard Lalor Sheil.

Blood strains made Michael Quinn not less, but more a patriot. Though no one better understood and more aptly applied the thought that “before man made us citizens, great Nature made us men." Yet he was an American of Americans. Public records show him, in advance of his time, the champion of popular rights. At a time when the drift was otherwise as a member of the school board of his home city, he stood for the rights of the sons and daughters of colored citizens in our public schools; as a legislator in this House he took advance ground for the rights of woman and children, and as a humanitarian he was always on the side of the struggling. He was a notable pioneer in opposition to capital punishment and in the movement for its abolition.

He was "a noble soul which neither gold nor love nor scorn can bend,” and "one who did noble things not dreamed them" only. And,

WHEREAS, It is fitting upon the passing of such a useful life that public note be made thereof and that a permanent record be preserved for the edification of posterity; therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives of the Forty-ninth General Assembly, That we give public recognition of the debt of gratitude due Michael C. Quinn from the State of Illinois for his able and faithful public service. That we honor him as an exemplary citizen, applaud his reputation as a loving husband, kind father and good neighbor, and sympathize profoundly with his family in their sad bereavement; and, be it further

Resolved, That a copy of this memorial duly engrossed and attested by the Speaker be transmitted by the Clerk of this House to the sorrowing family, and as a further mark of respect, that the House do now adjourn.

The resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising vote, and, in accordance therewith, at the hour of 1:20 o'clock p. m., the House stood adjourned.

THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1915, 10:00 O'CLOCK A. M.

The House met pursuant to adjournment,
The Speaker in the chair.
Prayer by the Rev. H. V. Davis.

The Journal of yesterday was being read, when, on motion of Mr. Mulcahy, the further reading of the same was dispensed with, and it was ordered to stand approved.

The House proceeding upon the order of petitions,

Mr. Shurtleff presented a petition from citizens of Marengo, Illinois, relating to the proposed changes in the State Game Law, which was referred under the rules to the Committee on Fish and Game, when appointed.

Mr. Shurtleff presented a petition from citizens of McHenry County, Illinois, requesting amendments to the road laws of Illinois, which was referred under the rules to the Committee on Roads and Bridges, when appointed.

Mr. Shurtleff presented a petition from citizens of Boone County, Illinois, requesting amendments to the State Road Laws, and requesting a standard width tread for all new sleighs and cutters, to be used in the State of Illinois, which was referred under the rules to the Committee on Roads and Bridges, when appointed.

Mr. Shurtleff presented a petition from citizens of Boone County, Illinois, relative to State aid to poultry associations, which was referred under the rules to the Committee on Appropriations, when appointed.

The House proceeding upon the order of introduction of bills, the roll call of yesterday was resumed for that purpose, whereupon

Mr. Kessinger introduced a bill, House Bill No. 63, a bill for “An Act to provide for the acquisition, equipment, conduct and maintainance of public playgrounds in and by cities having a population of less than one hundred fifty thousand (150,000)."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Municipalities, when appointed.

Mr. Leech introduced a bill, House Bill No. 64, a bill for “An Act to make an appropriation for the construction, erection, and equipment of the buildings at the State Colony for Epileptics near Dixon, Illinois,"

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Appropriations, when appointed.

Mr. Lipshulch introduced a bill, House Bill No. 65, a bill for “An Act to amend an Act entitled, 'An Act concerning corporations,' approved April 18, 1872, in force July 1, 1872, by amending section 5 thereof."

The bill was taken up, read by title, ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Judiciary, when appointed.

Mr. Lipshulch introduced a bill, House Bill No. 66, a bill for "An Act to amend an Act entitled, 'An Act relating to receivers and assignees of banks, banking institutions, banking firms, and savings banks,'

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