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PRACTICE,

31. Upon the demand of five members, which may be oral or in writing and made before or after a viva voce vote, or before or after a division, the yeas and nays shall be taken on any question, and entered upon the Journal. Such demand shall be made before proceeding to other business.

32. Upon a call of the House for the yeas and nays on any question the names of the members shall be called in alphabetical order.

33. A motion to strike out the enacting words of a bill shall have a precedence of a motion to amend, and, if carried, shall be considered equivalent to its rejection.

34. No person shall visit or remain at the Clerk's table, while the yeas and nays are being called, and in the performance of their duties, all clerks of the House shall be under the supervision and control of the Speaker.

35. A motion for commitment, until it shall be decided, shall preclude all amendments to the main question.

36. A motion to lay any particular proposition on the table shall apply to that particular proposition only.

37. No motion or proposition on a subject different from that under consideration shall be admitted under color of an amendment.

38. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the Speaker or any member desires it.

39. When a motion is made, it shall be stated by the Speaker or if it be in writing, it shall be read aloud by the Clerk before debate thereon.

40. After a motion is stated by the Speaker, or read by the Clerk, it shall be considered in possession of the House, but may be withdrawn at any time before decision or amendment, by leave of the House.

41. Any member may call for a division of the question, when divisible, but a motion to strike out and insert shall be indivisible.

42. Whenever any member is about to speak in debate, or deliver any matter to the House, he shall rise and respectfully address himself to "Mr. Speaker," and confine himself to the question under debate, and avoid personality, and no motion shall be considered in order unless made from the seat occupied by the member.

43. When two or more members arise at once, the Speaker shall name the member who is to speak first.

44. All questions, except as provided in Rules 45 and 51, whether in the Committee of the whole or in the House, shall be disposed of in the order in which they are moved, except that in filling up blanks the largest sum and the most remote day shall be the first put.

45. The rules of the House shall be observed in all committees as far as may be applicable.

46. When the committee reports a substitute for an original bill, with the recommendation that the substitute pass, it shall be in order to read the substitute a first time at once and order it printed.

47. Petitions, memorials and other papers addressed to the House may be presented by any member, who shall state briefly to the House the contents thereof, which may be received, read and referred on the same day.

48. No member shall speak longer than thirty minutes at one time, nor more than once on the same question, except by leave of the House; but the member who introduces a measure shall, in all cases, have the right to close the debate, and this right shall not be denied him even after the previous question has been ordered, although he may have spoken once on the same subject: Provided, the member so speaking shall not be allowed more time in all than is permitted by the rules of the House to other members.

49. While the Speaker is putting a question or addressing the House, or when a member is speaking, no person shall walk out of or across the room, or pass between the member speaking and the Chair, or entertain private discourse.

50. If any member, in speaking or otherwise, transgresses the rules of the House, the Speaker, shall or any member may, call him to order.

51. When a question is under debate, no'motion shall be received but-
To fix the time to which adjourn.
To adjourn.
A call of the House.

To lay on the table.
The previous question.
To commit.
To postpone to a day certain.
To postpone to a day indefinitely.
To amend.

Which several motions shall have precedence in the order in which they are named; and no motion

To postpone to a day certain.
To commit, or
To postpone indefinitely,

Being decided, shall again be allowed on the same day, or at the same stage of the bill or proposition.

Provided, that when a call of the House, or a roll call upon any bill, resolution or motion, shall disclose the fact that there is not a quorum present, then the following shall be the order of business

A motion: To produce a quorum by compelling the attendance of absent members.

To fix the time to which to adjourn.
To adjourn.
A motion for a call of the House.

52. The rules of parliamentary practice comprised in Cushings' Parliamentary Rules and Practice, shall govern the House in all cases in which they are applicable and in which they are not inconsistent with the standing rules and orders of the House, or the joint rules of the Senate and House of Representatives.

53. If a question be lost by adjournment of the House, and revived on the succeeding day, no member who has spoken on the preceding day shall be prmitted to speak again on the same question without leave.

54. Any two members shall have the liberty to dissent from, and protest, in respectful language, against any act or resolution which they shall think injurious to the public or any individual, and have the reasons of their dissent entered upon the Journal.

55. Questions shall be distinctly put in this form, viz: “As many as are of the opinion that” (as the case may be) say "Aye,” and, after the affirmative vote is expressed, “As many as are of the contrary opinion say, ““No.'” If the Speaker doubt, or if a division is called for, the House shall divide: those in the affirmative shall first rise from their seats, and afterwards those in the negative.

56. In forming a committee of the Whole House, the Speaker shall leave his chair, and a chairman to preside in the committee shall be appointed by the Speaker.

ADJOURNMENT.

57. The hour at which every motion to adjourn is made shall be entered on the Journal.

Ten o'clock in the morning shall be the standing hour to which the House shall adjourn unless otherwise ordered by a majority vote.

58. A motion to adjourn shall be decided without debate and not be subject to amendment.

59. No rule shall be suspended without the vote on roll call or division, of two-thirds of the members present, nor shall any rule be altered or amended without one day's notice being given of the motion thereof, and the vote on roll call of two-thirds of the members present, but any amendment or alteration having the approval of the Rules Committee may be adopted on roll call or division by a majority of the members elected.

PREVIOUS QUESTION. 60. The previous question shall be put in this form: “Shall the main question be now put?” and until it is decided shall preclude all amendments or debate. When it is decided that the main question shall not now be put, the main question shall be considered as still remaining under debate.

The effect of the main question's being ordered shall be to put an end to all debate, and bring the House to a direct vote, first, upon all amend

ments reported or pending in the inverse order in which they are offered. After the motion for the previous question has; prevailed, it shall not be in order to move for a call of the House unless it shall appear by yeas and Days, as taken on the main question, that no quorum is present; or to move to adjourn prior to a decision of the main question: Provided, if a motion to postpone is pending the only effect of the previous question shall be to bring the House to a vote upon such motion,

61. All resolutions or petitions calling for the appointment of committees, or involving the expenditure of money, and all orders in reference to the appointed employees, or the increase of compensation of employees, or the expenditure of moneys for 'incidental expenses of the session shall be referred to the Appropriate Committee without debate.

The question being on the adoption of the report of the Committee on Rules, a call of the roll was had, resulting as follows: Yeas, 142; nays, 1.

Those voting in the affirmative are: Messrs.
Atwood
Donlan
Hoffman
Morris

Shurtleff
Barker
Drake

Holaday
Mulcahy

Smejkal
Basel
Dudgeon
Hruby

O'Connell Sonnemann
Benson
Elliott
Hubbard
O'Rourke

Stanfield
Bentley
Ellis
Huston
Pace

Stewart
Bippus
Epstein
Igoe
Perkins

Strubinger
Boyd
Fahy
Jackson
Pierson

Taylor
Boyer
Farrell
Jacobson
Placek

Thomason
Brewer
Felts
Kane

Prendergast Thompson
Brinkman
Festerling
Kasserman Purdunn

Thon
Brown, W. M. Fieldstack

Kessinger Quisenberry Tice Browne, L. O'N. Flagg

Lantz

Rethmeier Tompkins
Bruce
Foster
Leech

Richardson Trandel
Burns
Frankhauser LePage

Rinehart

Turnbaugh
Burres
Franz
Lipshulch Roderick

Turner
Butler
Gardner
Lyle
Roe, A.

Tuttle
Buxton
Garesche
Lynch

Rostenkowski Vickers
Campbell
Gorman
Lyon

Rothschild Vursell
Conlon
Graham, T. E. Madsen

Rowe, W. Walsh
Cooper
Graham, W. J. Mason

Ryan, Frank Watson
Curren, C. Green, E. W. Maucker

Ryan, F. J. Weber Curran, T. Gregory

McCabe

Ryan, J. W. West
Dahlberg
Griffin
McCormick Santry

Williamson
Dalton
Groves
McGloon
Scanlan

Wilson, G. H.
Davis
Harvey
Meents
Scholes

Wilson, H.
Devereux
Helwig
Merritt

Schuberth Wilson, R. E.
Devine
Hennebry
Moore
Seif

Young
De Young
Hicks
Morrasy

Shephard Mr. Speaker
Donahue
Hilton

Total-142.
Those voting in the negative are: Mr.
Ray

Total-1.
And the report of the Committee on Rules was adopted.
Mr. Scanlan offered the following resolution and moved its adoption:

HOUSE RESOLUTION No. 24. WHEREAS, The Hon. Irving H. Trowbridge, a member of the Fortieth and Forty-first General Assemblies, from LaSalle County, departed this life on the tenth day of March, A. D. 1914, and

WHEREAS, The said Hon. Irving H. Trowbridge was an honored citizen of this State, a man thoroughly representative of its business 'interests; one who always took a prominent part in all movements for the public good, doing all in his power to protect and advance the interests of this State; a man who as a member of this House; attained a prominent position and one who was ever watchful of the welfare of the people of his District, and of the State at large; one who served the people of his community in different official capacities, with credit to himself, and a man whose every act, both as a public officer, and as a private citizen was in behalf of the people; therefore, be it

Resolved, That in the death of the Hon. Irving H. Trowbridge, the people of his community lost one of its leading citizens and the State of Illinois

one whose every act and vote as a member of this House was in the interest of and for the good of the people of his district, and the State at large; his wife a loving husband, his children a kind and indulgent father, and the community in which he resided, an honored and distinguished citizen; and, be it further

Resolved, That this preamble and resolution be spread upon the Journal of the House, and that a suitably engrossed copy thereof be forwarded to the family of the deceased, and as a further mark of respect, that the House do now adjourn.

The resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising vote, and, in accordance therewith, at the hour of 12:45 o'clock p. m., the House stood adjourned.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 1915, 10:00 O'CLOCK A. M.

The House met pursuant to adjournment,
The Speaker in the chair.
Prayer by the Rev. H. V. Davis.

The Journal of yesterday was being read, when, on motion of Mr. Walsh, the further reading of the same was dispensed with, and it was ordered to stand approved.

Mr. Flagg moved that the House proceed to the election of a First Assistant Clerk,

And the motion prevailed.

Whereupon, Mr. Flagg placed in nomination for First Assistant Clerk, Mr. E. M. Gullick of Bond County.

Mr. Gregory placed in nomination Mr. J. H. Hill of Macon County.

There being no other nominations, a call of the roll was had, resulting as follows: Number of votes cast.

.133 For Mr. Gullick

78 votes For Mr. Hill

55 votes
Those voting for Mr. Gullick are: Messrs.
Atwood
Devereux
Harvey
Pace

Shurtleff
Basel
De Young
Hennebry
Placek

Sonnemann
Bentley
Donlan

Jacobson
Purdunn

Stewart
Bippus
Dudgeon
Kane
Ray

Taylor
Boyd
Elliott
Kessinger Rentchler

Thomason
Brinkman
Epstein
Lantz

Rethmeier Tice
Brown, W. M. Farrell

Leech
Rinehart

Tompkins
Burns
Felts
Lipshulch Roe, A.

Trandel
Campbell
Festerling
Lynch

Rostenkowski Tuttle
Conlon
Fieldstack
McCabe

Ryan, Frank Vickers
Cooper
Flagg

McCormick Ryan, F. J. Vursell
Curren, C. Franz

McGloon

Ryan, J. W. Watson
Curran, T. Gardner

Meents
Santry

Weber
Dalton
Garesche

ritt
Schuberth

West
Davis
Graham, T. E. O'Connell

Seif

Wilson, H.
Desmond
Graham, W. J. O'Rourke

Total_-78.
Those voting for Mr. Hill are: Messrs.
Barker
Fahy
Holaday
Morrasy

Stanfield
Boyer
Foster
Hubbard
Morris

Strubinger
Brewer
Frankhauser Huston

Perkins

Thompson
Browne, L. O'N. Gorman

Igoe
Pierson

Thon
Bruce
Green, E. W. Kasserman Provine

Turnbaugh
Burres
Gregory
LePage

Quisenberry Turner
Butler
Griffin

Lyon

Richardson Walsh
Buxton
Groves
Madsen
Roderick

Williamson
Dahlberg
Hamlin
Mason

Rothschild Wilson, G. H.
Devine
Helwig
Maucker

Rowe, W. Wilson, R. E. Ellis Hilton Moore Scholes

Young

Total-55. Mr. Gullick having received the necessary constitutional majority, was declared elected First Assistant Clerk.

Mr. Flagg moved to reconsider the vote by which Mr. Gullick was elected First Assistant Clerk.

Mr. Tice moved to lay that motion on the table.

And the question being on the motion to table, it was decided in the affirmative.

M

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