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THE FAR EASTERN CRISIS OCCUPATION OF MANCHURIA BY JAPAN, BEGINNING OF JAPANESE_MILITARY

AGGRESSION, AND EFFORTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER POWERB TO PRESERVE PEACE_Continued

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1931 Dec. 26

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Dec. 26

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Dec. 29 (1146)

Dec. 29

709

From the Minister in China (tel.)

From Harbin: Report that Ma has funds for three months
and is acting under directions of Nanking although he has
anxiety over expected Japanese operations.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From Mukden and Chinchow: Report of clashes and
Japanese air activities.
From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)

Explanation of feeling among the Japanese military against
the reported assurances that they would not attack Chinchow;
request for instructions as to presenting the French Ambas-
sador with a copy of the U. S. note.
To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)

Instructions that French Ambassador may be given a copy
of note in strict confidence.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

Information from Chinchow that railway company has been
directed to assemble trains at Chinchow and the withdrawal
of Chinese troops is expected.
From the Chinese Chargé to the Chief of the Division of Far

Eastern Affairs
Transmittal of a telegram from the Chinese Ministry of
Foreign Affairs (text printed) placing upon Japan the respon-
sibility for whatever consequences may result from Japanese
insistence upon the railway administration's transporting a
number of soldiers to Tientsin, not in accordance with the
Protocol of 1901.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

Information that Chang is withdrawing from Chinchow
under pressure of Japanese arguments and in view of his lack
of support from Nanking.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From Mukden: Report of Japanese advances and of addi-
tional troop trains leaving Mukden.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

Information from Chinchow of Chinese withdrawal, which
is to be completed within the week; authorization to Margetts
to return at his discretion.
Piom the Consul General at Canton (tel.)

Information that an order for the dissolution of the National
Government at Canton is being issued.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From the Military Attaché at Chinchow: Information that
Provisional Government will remain at Chinchow, and that
the line of Japanese control is to be settled by diplomatic
negotiation.

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Dec. 30 (1153)

710

Dec. 30 (1154)

711

Dec. 30 (1156)

Dec. 31

711

711

Dec. 31

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THE FAR EASTERN CRISIS OCCUPATION OF MANCHURIA BY JAPAN, BEGINNING OF JAPANESE_MILITARY

AGGRESSION, AND EFFORTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER POWERS TO PRESERVE PEACE_Continued

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1931 Dec. 31

711

1932 Jan. 1

(2)

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713

Jan. 2

(4)

From the Appointed Chinese Minister

Transmittal of a telegram from the Chinese Ministry of
Foreign Affairs (text printed) citing Japanese advances as
violation of the Council resolution and expressing the hope
that the United States will take effective measures to prevent
the aggravation of the present situation.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From the Military Attaché at Chinchow: Report of con-
fusion incident to Chinese withdrawal and of Japanese occu-
pation of Kowpangtze.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From Nanking: Account of the reorganization of the Gov-
ernment, with the President of the Executive Yuan as virtual
Prime Minister responsible to the Central Executive Com-
mittee of the party; preponderance of men from the Southern
provinces; diminishing of prospects for a successful coalition
government due to the absence of Chiang, Soong and others.
From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)

Transmittal of note from the Chinese delegation to the President of the Council (text printed) setting forth Japan's violation of the Council's resolution of December 10 and requesting the Council's adoption of effective measures to deal with the situation; covering letter from Berthelot (text printed) advising of representations made by the French and other Governments.

714

Jan. 6

(2)

CHINA NEGOTIATIONS FOR RELINQUISHMENT BY THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER POWERS

OF EXTRATERRITORIAL RIGHTS IN CHINA

716

1931
Jan. 2 From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
(3)

Foreign Office expression of appreciation for U. S. views as
set forth in telegram No. 334, December 31, 1930, to the Am-
bassador in Great Britain; British opinion that with the grad-
ual cessation of civil war in China, the demand for abolition
of extraterritoriality would unite all factions and might result
in anti-foreign boycott unless foreign governments make some

gesture to meet the situation. Jan. 13 To the Minister in China (tel.)

Advice that the Department believes prompt action and the offer of some concessions desirable; information that a new draft of agreement covering relinquishment of extraterritorial rights will be ready shortly and that the British Government

may submit new proposals at the same time. Jan. 19 To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.) (16) Instructions to request Foreign Office views on Department's

new draft proposals (being sent by mail); outline of principal changes in this draft as compared with draft of October 28, 1930.

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CHINA

NEGOTIATIONS FOR RELINQUISHMENT BY THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER POWERS

of EXTRATERRITORIAL RIGHTS IN CHINA-Continued

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1931 Jan. 21

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Jan. 27

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Jan. 30

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Feb. 3

(34)

Feb. 7

726

From the Minister in China (tel.)

Outline of points that should be insisted upon in any settle-
ment of the extraterritoriality question.
From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)

Foreign Office expectation that can accept all of the De-
partment's amendments as set forth in telegram No. 16, Janu-
ary 19.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

Comments of the British Chargé on the new U. S. draft
proposals.
To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)

Instructions to inform the British Foreign Office of the De-
partment's intentions to resume the discussion of extraterri-
toriality with the Chinese Minister, using the new proposals
previously outlined as a basis therefor.
From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)

Account of conference with Foreign Office experts, who ex-
pressed preference for gradual yielding by foreign governments
rather than for such full acquiescence to Chinese claims as set
forth in American proposals; summary of conversation (text
printed) giving viewpoints approved by Foreign Office experts.
To the Chinese Legation

Statement read and handed to the Chinese Minister, con-
taining observations on various points with a view to adjusting
the differences between the American and Chinese proposals.
Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs

Oral statement to the Chinese Minister (text printed) point-
ing out that the internal problems of China must be taken into
account by foreign governments in regard to the position of
their nationals in China, and that the United States cannot
assent to any arrangement failing to safeguard the interests of
its nationals.
To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)

Outline of the written and oral statements made to the
Chinese Minister, with instructions to give to the Foreign
Office the text of the former, explaining that it is to be con-
sidered a statement from one negotiator to another.
To the Minister in China (tel.)

Information on present status of extraterritoriality negoti-
ations, and instructions to go to Nanking after the British
Minister's arrival there.
Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State

Conversation with the Chinese Minister, who presented a
memorandum (printed infra).
From the Chinese Legation

Statement by the Chinese Minister regarding main points
on which U. S. and Chinese Governments differ.

Feb. 7

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732

Feb. 10

(35)

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CHINA NEGOTIATIONS FOR RELINQUISHMENT BY THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER POWERS

OF EXTRATERRITORIAL RIGHTS IN CHINA-Continued

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1931
Feb. 26 To the Minister in China (tel.)
(67) Transmittal of the Chinese statement, and observation that

the Department's best contribution at present will be tempo-
rarily to suspend its efforts and await developments; instruc-
tions to inform the British Minister and to ascertain, if possi-
ble, what the British Minister intends to propose, if anything.

(Footnote: Similar information to the Embassy in Great

Britain for communication to British Foreign Office.)
Feb. 27 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of a Conversa-

tion With the Norwegian Minister
Minister's advice that the Norwegian Government had offi-
cially informed the Chinese that when the Great Powers gave

up extraterritorial rights, Norway would follow suit.
Mar. 3 To the Consul General at Nanking (tel.)
(5) For the Minister: Instructions to reiterate to the British

Minister, Sir Miles Lampson, that this Government is taking
no new step for the moment; also to impress upon the Chinese
Foreign Minister, Wang, the desirability of modifying his non-
conciliatory attitude, and to inquire, if advisable, what his
attitude would be toward a proposal to transfer the negotia-

tions to Nanking.
Mar. 3 From the Minister in China (tel.)

Information that the Japanese Chargé has received word that the Department has decided to drop negotiations at Washing

ton and transfer them to China. Mar. 4 To the Consul General at Nanking (tel.) (6)

For the Minister: Advice that Debuchi (Japanese Minister in Washington) was told in strict confidence of the possibility of transferring negotiations, and that the Department is await

ing comment on Wang's attitude before taking further action.
Mar. 4 From the Minister in China (tel.)
(101) From Yunnanfu: Receipt of a communication from the

Yunnan delegate of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs (text
printed) advising that mixed cases will be treated the same as

Chinese cases.
Mar. 7 From the British Embassy
(65) Transmittal of substance of instructions issued to Lampson

(text printed) outlining points to which the British Govern-
ment attach the greatest importance and for which they are

prepared to relinquish others.
Mar. 7 Memorandum by the Minister in China

Conversation with Dr. Wang, who was informed that the British and American Governments held in common the view that extraterritoriality should not be swept away all at once and without substitution of a better arrangement; observation by Dr. Wang that his Government could not make any concessions in regard to certain points and that a deadlock would

result. Mar. 8 Memorandum by the Minister in China

Conversation with the British Minister, who related a conversation with Dr. Wang in which he was informed that the Chinese Government could make no concessions regarding the fundamental principles asked by the British.

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744 CHINA

NEGOTIATIONS FOR RELINQUISHMENT BY THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER POWERS

OF EXTRATERRITORIAL RIGHTS IN CHINA-Continued

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1931
Mar. 9 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of a Conversa-

tion With the Japanese Ambassador
Information from the Japanese Ambassador that Japan is
planning to begin extraterritoriality negotiations with China,
pressing for gradual abolition, and hoping to work closely

with Great Britain and the United States.
Mar. 9 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs

of a Conversation With the Counselor of the Japanese Em

bassy
Counselor's delivery of Japanese memorandum (printed
infra), with explanation that it contained proposals which

Japan intended to make to Chinese Government.
l'ndated From the Japanese Embassy
(Rec'd Memorandum proposing a gradual relinquishment of extra-
Mar. 91 | territorial rights in China and most-favored-nation treatment.
Mar. 9 To the Minister in China (tel.)
(92) Comment on the discussion of the question of extraterritori-

ality by the Consul at Yunnanfu with the Chinese authorities;
instructions to advise American consular officers in China not
to enter into discussion of extraterritoriality with Chinese
authorities unless specific cases arise which necessitate such

action.
Mar. 11 Memorandum by Mr. Joseph E. Jacobs of the Division of Far

Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Minister concerning a reply
to the Chinese statement of February 20; Department's posi-
tion that in view of the restricted nature of the Minister's in-
structions, its only reply can be that contained in a statement

(printed infra) which was handed to the Minister. Mar. 11 To the Chinese Legation

Statement to the Chinese Minister advising that the Department is instructing the American Minister in China to un

dertake discussions with the Chinese Foreign Minister. Mar. 12 Memorandum by the Minister in China

Conversation with Dr. Wang, who could see no value in transferring the negotiations to China unless United States

was prepared to concede the three controversial points. Mar. 13 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State

Conversation with the British Ambassador, who outlined a discussion between Sir Miles Lampson and Dr. Wang in China, indicating little progress; discussion of the exact application of

the term "international settlement” concerning Shanghai. Mar. 14 | From the Minister in China (tel.) (131) Observation that the informal inquiries, made by the Consul

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at Yunnan in an effort to obtain information requested by the
Department, may be revealing as to the exact nature of in-
structions from Nanking for Chinese control over foreigners

having extraterritorial rights.
Mar. 14 To the Consul General at Nanking (tel.)
(12) For the Minister: Outline for proceeding with the negotia-

tions in China, with instructions to discuss the plan of action
with British Minister.

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