Young People's History of Virginia and Virginians

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B. F. Johnson publishing Company, 1904 - 248 páginas
 

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Página 233 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Página 237 - He has constrained our fellow-citizens, taken captive on the high seas, to bear arms against their country, to become the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to fall themselves by their hands.
Página 238 - Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of DIVINE PROVIDENCE, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.
Página 235 - Because we hold it for a fundamental and undeniable truth " that religion, or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence.
Página 233 - That government is, or ought to be, instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security of the people, nation, or community.
Página 233 - That no man or set of men are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or Privileges from the community, but in consideration of public services; which not being descendible, neighter ought the offices of magistrate, legislator or judge to be hereditary.
Página 234 - That in all capital or criminal prosecutions a man hath a right to demand the cause and nature of his accusation...
Página 234 - That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed; nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.
Página 236 - In Congress, July 4, 1776 The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires...
Página 234 - That in controversies respecting property, and in suits between man and man, the ancient trial by jury is preferable to any other, and ought to be held sacred.

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